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My GP100 always had a smooth trigger, but I finally decided to try and lighten the pull some; my goal was 8 lbs DA. When I took the gun apart I was happy to find that there weren't rough edges or tool marks on the active surfaces. I buffed a few places and ordered the appropriate shims for the trigger, hammer and hammer dog from URL="http://triggershims.com/"]http://triggershims.com/[/URL]. I installed the shims today and put everything back together installing a Wolff 12 lb hammer spring and a 10 lb trigger spring (as per Iowegean's recommendations). Low and behold my SA trigger pull dropped 1/2 lb, down to 3 1/4 and the DA pull was just at 8 lbs. I don't know what it was before, my trigger pull gauge only goes to 8 lbs. So I'm happy about that, but my hammer still rubs on the left side even though I put both .002" shims on the left side. I know that I can judiciously shave the hammer .001"-.002" to get my clearance, but I was wondering if anybody had any other ideas (this is a blued gun so I don't want to cut on the gun frame).
 

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More shims on the side that's rubbing as long as the hammer still has clearance to work freely.
Congrats on the trigger job. I just did my gp100 too.
Well worth it I reckon.
 

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I decided to get a little outside of my comfort zone and file the side of the hammer a little. I pulled a fine little file out of my father's tool box (he was a Tool & Die Maker) and stroked the hammer, periodically testing the clearance. When I could slide a .0015 feeler gauge between the hammer and the frame I stopped - do as little filing as possible. Then I removed the hammer and polished it. The DA trigger pull is at about 7 7/8 lb. - depending on the accuracy of the trigger pull gauge - and smooth. Thanks to Iowegean's, manual the job was easy.
 

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How do you smooth out a 1974 Security Six trigger pull? the pull seems to have a hump after 1/2 inch of pull, then finishes fine.
 

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If may be that the sear engagement area is 'pushing' your hammer to the side. Inspection of the wear pattern at this area may show not parallel engagement. Be careful with the shims as if you don't have enough freeplay you will find your DA getting tighter again.

When I did my trigger work on my GP100 I ran into same issue you speak of here, I realized the minimal rub was not effecting my pulls and it eventually polished itself out:)

Karl
 

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Greets,

I have read the entire Michigan Centers webpage and all links there from. To include Kevin's SP101 trigger job guide. :)

But I must ask, (because I'm wholeheartedly interested) who is this "Iowegean" you speak of? And what recommendations did he provide?

Andre
 

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Andre Coop, I believe that would be me. I wrote 14 short booklets and 4 full books on various Ruger handguns, 10/22s and Mini-14s. They are no longer available and haven't been since about this time in 2011. That said, if you need specific information ... ask away.
 

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Andre Coop, I believe that would be me. I wrote 14 short booklets and 4 full books on various Ruger handguns, 10/22s and Mini-14s. They are no longer available and haven't been since about this time in 2011. That said, if you need specific information ... ask away.
That's me, a day late and $3 short!!!

I'm not a smith, nor an armorer, but am a master gunner. That being said, I can probably still disassemble and reassemble a M240 trigger blindfolded in under 45 seconds. Or, I've been known to tinker...

If I were to spend a few $$$ more and get the Match Champion, can it still be disassembled with the work that was performed at the factory and still go back together without getting all of those fancy micro-metered and shimmed parts out of alignment?

Also, if I went on the cheap and got a base line GP100, and followed the guides and did the polishing and shimming myself, to include using the Wolff spring kit, could it be "close enough" to the Match Champion?

I ask, because one, I'm truly interested, and two I've been known to tinker...

That's an impressive CV...
 

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If I were to spend a few $$$ more and get the Match Champion, can it still be disassembled with the work that was performed at the factory and still go back together without getting all of those fancy micro-metered and shimmed parts out of alignment?
No, nothing will become misaligned simply by disassembling and reassembling the Match Champion.

Also, if I went on the cheap and got a base line GP100, and followed the guides and did the polishing and shimming myself, to include using the Wolff spring kit, could it be "close enough" to the Match Champion?
No, a base model GP100 stripped down, resprung, polished, and shimmed will not be "close enough" to a Match Champion.

It would be better.
 

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No, nothing will become misaligned simply by disassembling and reassembling the Match Champion.



No, a base model GP100 stripped down, resprung, polished, and shimmed will not be "close enough" to a Match Champion.

It would be better.
What will make it better than the Match Champion? I assume you are telling us that the work done by the folks at the Ruger factory can be done better. I have a keen interest since I just did the DROS in a new bone stock GP100 SS 4".
 

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I currently have a Performance Center S&W 357, a Blackhawk convertible 357, a Ruger GP100, and other revolvers. I have done the springs and a mild polish job on action on the GP100. I have some money to get a GP tuned (professional action job, possibly cut for moon clips, etc.). All things being equal, should I get my current GP100 further worked, or would it better for the gunsmith I select to work on a brand new GP100? Further, would it make sense to start with a Match Champion, or the standard GP100?
 

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Andre Coop, Varminterror is right ... there's nothing magic about a Match Champion. It may be a little better out-of-the-box than a standard GP100 but it certainly is not an optimum revolver.

First and foremost, way too much emphasis is placed on the almighty trigger pull and not enough is placed on good shooting techniques ... but I guess that is a topic for another thread. I think even well experienced shooters would rather have a light smooth trigger pull than a harsh creepy trigger pull so we'll go with that premise.

Too bad you aren't local to me ... I'd have you shoot my two GP100s. Both are 1995 vintage, not that it matters. One is a 4" stainless high polish, the other is a brushed stainless 6". I went through both of them and did the fluff and buff routine, plus shims, plus lighter springs. I guarantee ... either one would put an out-of-the-box Match Champion to shame. Also, both guns are 100% reliable even with the hardest magnum primers. I got lucky when I bought these guns ... neither had a canted barrel, or a bore constriction, or undersized cylinder throats, or a corrupt forcing cone. Further, both had excellent cylinder-to-bore alignment, minimal endshake, normal B/C gap, with a good overall fit and finish. These are things that can screw up what would appear to be a decent revolver and unfortunately, are all to common for factory new GP100s ... no matter when they were built. The point being, if you start with a solid GP100 that is mechanically sound, an hour on the bench will turn it into an excellent revolver ... capable of matching or exceeding S&W's competitive Model 686 (yes, I have one of those too).

Here's my "shoot the a*s out of a gnat at 50 paces" 6" GP100, (KGP-161) born in 1995:



and my deadly accurate GKGP-141 4 incher, also born in 1995:

 

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I think much of the problems with the Match Champion are in its very name! If Ruger would have came out with a different name say Ruger GP100 Enhanced then do just that better finish work on fitting of parts smoothing the internals out no rough spots burrs etc. then have a lighter trigger pull in SA & DA modes, this gun would be a better seller with the finishing work. Would deliver higher expectations!!! BTW Iowegan thanks for sharing pictures of your two Ruger GP100's
 

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Many thanks to all.

I'm now even more so inspired to tinker...

Beautiful weapons there good sir!
 

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What will make it better than the Match Champion? I assume you are telling us that the work done by the folks at the Ruger factory can be done better. I have a keen interest since I just did the DROS in a new bone stock GP100 SS 4".
Yup - I'm telling you the work they do on the Match Champion beyond what gets done to any standard GP100 is pretty minimal. Taking cast and machined parts and hitting them with a buffing wheel to make them shiny really doesn't count as precision tuning nor proper polishing. The stock springs in the MC don't do it any favors either. It's a LITTLE better than a bone stock standard GP when it leaves Ruger, but if a guy puts any effort at all into a standard GP action, or even a MC action, it gets a lot better in a hurry.

So again - a bone stock, standard GP100 even with a kitchen table gunsmith action job will feel better than a Match Champion.

(BUT - you can do the same action job to a Match Champion too, and end up with a lot sexier revolver!).
 

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Does the shimming help with the DA pull? I only own one other revolver and it's a pietta 1860 army. I see the hammer rubs sometimes but it doesn't seem to affect how crisp it shoots.
 

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What will make it better than the Match Champion? I assume you are telling us that the work done by the folks at the Ruger factory can be done better. I have a keen interest since I just did the DROS in a new bone stock GP100 SS 4".
IF Ruger had a custom shop the work could be done better. HOWEVER, even then I would probably go with a good gunsmith to do the tuning. Factories deal in production volume to keep unit cost down and the factory overhead is a lot higher than the gunsmith's. It seems even S&W's Custom Shop guns can be improved upon.

The gunsmith can polish the action parts and refit for optimal tolerances along with adding shims which the Match Champ has. While there other things can be done that the factory does not do such as cut cylinder for speedloader use, polish the forcing cone. check firing pin protrusion and correct if necessary, polish and recontour the trigger.
 
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