Ruger Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently purchased a GP100 with 5" barrel and it is quickly becoming my favorite hand gun, next to my 1911s. I read how much the ruger triggers could be lacking but in all honesty I am pretty surprised how good this trigger is, not perfect, but good.

I purchased this revolver as a do all truck gun, paper puncher, SD if need be, etc etc, and plan to keep it forever. I am generally a do it yourselfer but I think I would rather have an experienced smith polish up my trigger. I may add a trigger spring later but will likely leave the hammer spring alone.

So, who do you recommend? I am about an hour south of Atlanta Ga and local would be nice but I can ship it off if needed. Also I would liked to get the cylinder chamfered. No plans to compete but I think it would be nice for reloading.

I have done quite a bit of searching and it seems there is almost too much info and its hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.

If anyone suggests I do it myself, the biggest problem I have it what stones/tools to use. I am mechanically inclined, but the honing and polishing seems more artistic to me than mechanical.

Sorry for the long post and any info is much appreciated.

Happy Thanksgiving



PS. Anyone trying to decide between the 4.2" GP100 and the 6", I say get the 5". Granted I have only held one other GP100 and it was the 3" Whiley Clap, but I dont see how either of the other 2 good suite me any better, plus aesthetically the 5" looks perfect to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,056 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I recently purchased a GP100 with 5" barrel and it is quickly becoming my favorite hand gun, next to my 1911s. I read how much the ruger triggers could be lacking but in all honesty I am pretty surprised how good this trigger is, not perfect, but good.

I purchased this revolver as a do all truck gun, paper puncher, SD if need be, etc etc, and plan to keep it forever. I am generally a do it yourselfer but I think I would rather have an experienced smith polish up my trigger. I may add a trigger spring later but will likely leave the hammer spring alone.

So, who do you recommend? I am about an hour south of Atlanta Ga and local would be nice but I can ship it off if needed. Also I would liked to get the cylinder chamfered. No plans to compete but I think it would be nice for reloading.

I have done quite a bit of searching and it seems there is almost too much info and its hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.

If anyone suggests I do it myself, the biggest problem I have it what stones/tools to use. I am mechanically inclined, but the honing and polishing seems more artistic to me than mechanical.

Sorry for the long post and any info is much appreciated.

Happy Thanksgiving



PS. Anyone trying to decide between the 4.2" GP100 and the 6", I say get the 5". Granted I have only held one other GP100 and it was the 3" Whiley Clap, but I dont see how either of the other 2 good suite me any better, plus aesthetically the 5" looks perfect to me.
DO IT YOURSELF, WITH THIS EASY STEP BY STEP GUIDE!!!
I have done it on all my double action GP100s and SP101s (It's the same setup for both)
Include a reduced power trigger return spring and reduced power hammer spring and you'll absolutley love the feel of the revolver.

Here's the link to the step by step guide:
(Remember, SP101 and GP100 have same trigger assembly, just different frame)
This step by step works perfectly for the GP100 & SP101
Ruger SP-101 Trigger Job Guide

^^^ This is the link^^^^^
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Whoever is doing the work before it is started I would find out precisely what they will do. Sometimes the cheap ones will just change springs. Generally, one gets what they pay for. As noted above Gemini Customs is noted for their Ruger work. Others to consider would be:

GrantCunningham.com - Home
Mag-na-port International--Home Page
The Action Works
Welcome to Apex Tactical Specialties, Inc.
Actions By T - Teddy Jacobson Pistolsmith


Grant Cunningham has a 2 year waiting list and currently is not open to new work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
You need to 'marry' the hammer and trigger. Just put a mark with a marking pin where they meet and cycle them. The places the color is worn through are a little high. a VERY FINE Arkansas stone held flat across the surface will usually take down those high spots in a few minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
Yep... gotta agree that a good first measure is to try a 13# or 14# hammer spring from Wolff (gunsprings.com). I tried it, wondering if it would make a difference and save me the consternation of getting a reliable trigger job (and have to pay for it). I did it, with a little YOU_TOOB help, and found I accomplished my objectives: a smoother trigger, without sacrificing reliability and sufficient firing pin force.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Please let a smith that knows what he is doing handle the job. It's worth the money to keep your gun from being ruined. I have tried cheap and inexperienced in the past and regreted it. And it's not a do it yousrelf project unless you really know what you're doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Some folk go bonkers on tuning a GP100 including matched custom trigger/hammer combo's. Some folk remove the transfer bar. Of course new springs, Hammer and Trigger shims, and a thorough polishing of internal parts and the list goes on. I've found that a set of Wolff springs with a deburring of internal parts, cleaning out the factory packing grease/oil and then reassembly with gun oil in necessary locations is usually all you'd need. If you need more than that, then Ruger has dropped the ball on the gun before it left the factory. I find that to be a very rare occurrence. Smithy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,034 Posts
The action on the new GP100 revolvers is pretty darn nice right out of the box. Stripping the revolver and cleaning out any machining crud, lubricating, and going to lighter Wolfe springs is all that I ever felt was neccessary. Along with some dry-firing to mate the parts.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was wondering if maybe the new GPs had "improved" triggers. I am not revolver buff or even a trigger aficionado but I do appreciate a good trigger and this GP aint bad.

I have noticed the hammers lightly contacts the frame on the left side so a shim may be in order but I may just shoot it and put in a lighter trigger spring.

I also am thinking I want the cylinder chamfered, it seems to me that loading it could be made much smoother.

Thanks for all the responses and feel free to keep them coming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Sounds good wap13 and yes I have noticed progressivly better triggers on Ruger's double actions. As far as this.............
I also am thinking I want the cylinder chamfered
............I've always found that that project is usually not necessary if you're shooting anything but wadcutters as the tapered end of the bullet does the job that you're looking for. Best of luck on your GP. Smithy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Shot a bit today, maybe 75-100 rounds. I had 4 other guns I was shooting so I didnt get exact round counts. The trigger did seem to smooth up a bit especially after cleaning and a little oil but the consistency still wasnt there. As mentioned I can see where the hammer contacts the frame on the right side so I ordered shims and the wolf spring pack. I will likely only put in the 10lb trigger spring and leave the hammer spring stock but will also have some 2000 grit handy for any obvious rough spots upon disassembly.

Really liking this gun, if I can get some 2" groups out of it at 25 yards I may take it hunting.

Thanks for all the suggestions, advice and info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,355 Posts
There's no rhyme or reason, I have a GP made in 1989 that's way slicker than my 2008 model. Also have a WELL used 6" blue model that I put the heaviest set of Wolff springs in and the action would make any S & W or Colt jealous:). I have Six series guns with actions like a rusty hinge and some that are super slick and even. None of them have had work done, just some are broken in or left the factory a little better fitted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
WAP13 -- Most guys find that the hammer spring makes the bigger difference since the "trigger" spring is basically just the return spring. You can feel the trigger spring when the trigger is pulled and your thumb holds the hammer. Usually these are smooth and good. And IF this will ever be a "needed" protection item, you will likely prefer a solid trigger return for the next round...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
WAP13 -- Most guys find that the hammer spring makes the bigger difference since the "trigger" spring is basically just the return spring. You can feel the trigger spring when the trigger is pulled and your thumb holds the hammer. Usually these are smooth and good. And IF this will ever be a "needed" protection item, you will likely prefer a solid trigger return for the next round...

While I have yet to install a new spring, or springs I think I do understand how both springs work and what can be expected. I am an "every little bit helps" kind of guy and my thought is while the hammer spring would make the most most difference a slightly lighter trigger return spring should help some, along with a little polishing, and the shims should help a little as well. I havent put a feeler gauge on the gun yet but I can see gaps not matching with my naked eye so I know it can be shimmed.

The logic behind doing the trigger return and not the hammer is reliable primer strikes. As of now I dont reload and want 100% function. I ordered a complete spring kit so I may try the heaviest hammer spring in the pack and see how it performs. And likewise if the reset on the trigger return isnt up to par I will put it back to stock.

Thanks for the suggestion/advice, I think ultimately I am just going to have to do some trial and error to see what suits me and my gun best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Wap13,
By your last post I see you’ve recognized the greatest truism of revolver ownership; just keep shooting it until it really smooth’s out. Swapping springs out to see what works better is the other revolver shooting secret. Unless the action is trued up and essentially retimed most “action jobs” simply bypass the break in process. It all depends on what the owner wants and I’ve spent more than my fair share of money on such “action jobs” which pleased my gunsmith and me. Now I’m older, more patient and better informed on firearms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,355 Posts
For a pure defensive gun I would leave the springs stock, under stress you don't want to risk short stroking the trigger and for the mainspring, you want all the primer popping power you can get. I use an SP101 and a snub Speed Six as my primary defense guns and both have stock springs. I have many other GPs and Sixes I use as range toys that I have put lighter springs in.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top