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Viceroy 馃煩馃煩馃煩
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife got an old "Velvet pipe and cigarette" tobacco tin from her grandparents' house after they passed away. Now, years later, she opened it up to see what is rattling around inside and it's full of her grandpa's old .22 cartridges. Looks like .22 longs but I could be mistaken. The "U" headstamp was pretty common when I was a kid but I don't know if it's in use anymore.
 

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feral, they don't make that ammo anymore, but i had some and it shoots just fine without problems. by the way it's 22long not lr and it doesn't look crappy , i would just shoot it and do save the tin they came in they are now colectables, i see them for sale on ebay and they get a decent price for those tins.
 

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Ya, I think the 'U' was for UMC.

If the lead is all fuzzy and swelled up just twist it in some fine steel wool and go shoot it up.

Just about the worst thing that can happen is it doesn't go off (not likely). Further its much safer to through away (recycle) the empty brass than live ammo.
 

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I had some old 12 gauge deer slugs that were my grandfathers, maybe at least 60 years old and they fired fine.
 

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I had a box of .22lr and .22short rounds that were purchased in 1970. I shot the box of .22lr the other day without a problem; worked fine. I still have most of the box of .22short, several are in a small .22 pistol I bought in TX back in the early 1960s.

In writing this I'm thinking I don't know when I bought those cartridges. Must have bought the .22lr rounds in 1970, that's when I bought the target rifle that uses them. Just not sure about the .22short rounds.
 

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Cool find. They may become museum artifacts if the dems get back in office..
 

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As long as it's not corroded, choot it.

Of course not all at one time, a few at a time so it brings back memories.
 

Viceroy 馃煩馃煩馃煩
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks for the replies. Trust me I'm not shooting this up or getting rid of the tin. This is staying on the shelf above my gun cleaning bench.

It's a good memory of a man who went all the way across Europe, the Battle of the Bulge (in some capacity, according to a relative - I guess he'd never talk about it in detail himself), liberated a concentration camp, then on to victory in Berlin. Then he came back home to live a humble life in a small house in a small town.

All of which was pretty normal for The Greatest Generation. But nowadays if people had to live in a little house like that, they'd wring their hands about how "poor" they are, then go protest for more social handouts because they think their life is so rough.
 

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Don't shoot it...

Not because it is dangerous, but because it may have value to a collector at some point...

Interesting that you found the rounds in a Velvet tin...

Over the decades I have seen this many times, from .22 to .38...Seems as if this was a common practice for pocket carry when in the field...

In fact, I have a Prince Albert tin right here with a number of .38 S&W blanks in it...
 

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I have a bunch of old .22's in a "Bigger Hair" tin can that I found in a log house on property that I bought in Wisconsin. I agree, save that stuff.
 

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I'd save it, too, given that it came in that container.

For those who do find old 22 ammo, be aware that there can be safety issues. We've picked up some old 22 ammo at estate sales. Some of the stuff has been fine, some has not.

If you get hang fires - a delay before the round goes off, stop shooting. Bad sign. That can lead to a squibb load - a load where the bullet fails to make it all the way out the barrel. Firing another round with a bullet stuck in the barrel is exceedingly dangerous. If a shot doesn't sound right, stop shooting and safely inspect for a clear barrel.
 

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I have a couple dozen of those lr I've had in an old steel coffee can. Given to me many years ago. Was quite a few but I've shot them thru the years but kept some. I also have some shorts with a big c on the bottom. What might those be?
 

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The " U " was used by Remington long after the merger with UMC , until fairly recently. I just went to check a box of Subsonic HP , but it has " Rem " on head.

IF it has been stored under halfway decent conditions old ammo ( & 1970 isn't near old ) is frequently still usable. But no, failure to fire is not worse case. As noted above squibs are a hassle to remove from bbl, and not noticing & firing again would be an obstructed bore scenario. Potentially worst is brittle brass that splits, and depending on design of gun could have gas venting in bad directions.
 

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Well my uncle knew a old man in Evant Texas that. Had been in World War I
He had a trunk that he had brought home that had his uniforms and all his military stuff that he had brought back from France.
In the mid 1980's this gentleman was approaching the end of his life he had some sort of Terminal cancer
So he called my Uncle Ned over to his house and had him climb up in to his attic and retrieve the trunk and gave the trunk to my uncle.
There where about 20 boxes of .45 acp ammunition and a model of 1911 (not A1) pistol with about ten loaded magazines.
So ...
Ned being the curious guy wanting to see if a pistol magazine that had been loaded in France in 1918 with 1918 Ammunition would still work
So he did not disturb the magazines
We went out behind grandmothers house and he inserted the old loaded magazine in the colt 1911 and fired every round.
Did it with ALL the loaded magazines
And they all functioned perfectly. The ammunition functioned perfectly. The gun functioned perfectly.....
Approximately 60 years un disturbed and everything worked fine.
He shot up all the ammo (over time)
He couldn't reload it because the primer hole was slightly bigger than standard large pistol primer are sized for.
I hate to say it but All the hand wringing over old Ammunition is really just in case...
Ammunition lasts a long time if kept in a clean dry place.
 
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