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Discussion Starter #1
A lot of the appeal of my guns to me is aesthetic. So I always clean them within a day of when I've used them. But I still don't think I'm very good at it. I believe I'm getting better with practice, but it takes me a long time.

This morning I cleaned both handguns (GP100 and single six) and cleaning two at one time definitely is less than twice the time to clean one. But still, I just feel awkward and cumbersome.

How long should it take you to get a mildly used, otherwise clean revolver perfectly clean? Half hour? Less?

One other really tiny detail question. I have a rag I use to just clean up the cleaner, off the gun and my hands. Then at the end I apply a little oil to the rag and go over the gun - metal and wood. Should I use a rag dedicated to oil only as opposed to using the rag that has cleaner on it?

Thanks.
 

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I would suggest having a dedicated set of rags for cleaner and another set for oil. The rags you use in the cleaner you'll need to wash after using. You can get away with one oil rag but it's going to get dirty and gritty after a while (which could put swirl marks all over your finish).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What's the reason for washing the cleaner rag after using? Is it the same 'contamination' issue that says not to dip a dirty brush into a clean bottle of cleaner?
 

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Hi Eddie, I clean my guns within a day or two if I don't have time the same day. If I'm using them again shortly, just a couple swipes down the bbl with brush dipped in solvent and also through the cylinders, clean patch until no residue or solvent appear, then a good wipe down with a solvent rag, clean rag, then an oily rag. They are good to go back to shooting at that point. If I get into the detail cleaning or I have been shooting one of my prizes, I do the cleaning with grip panels removed and the particular gun broken down into it's basic subassemblies. Seems everyone has their own routine, and lots use speciality items, sprays, cloths (rig rag). Basic idea is to get the gunpowder residue off the guns, along with any sweat or other corrosive. I also use a cleaning brush - looks like a toothbrush with big & little ends, to get into small crevices, around the forcing cone etc. On stainless guns, copper wool helps get the black ring off the front of the clyinder and back of the recoil shield. Also removes any slight blemishes in the surface finish.
I use a seperate rag to finish off that just has oil. The solvent contaminated rags need to be washed to get the dirt and grit out of them - otherwise you are just smearing it back onto your clean gus. Momma frowns on throwing them in with her towels and dishcloths. Everything ends up smelling like Hoppes. So wash them seperate with an extra rinse cycle.
I usually use Rem Oil as a wipe down to finish off the cleaning before putting them away in the safe.
Anything you do using the proper components and cleaners will do the job. Sounds like you are doing just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
quote:Originally posted by jimbo1096

On stainless guns, copper wool helps get the black ring off the front of the clyinder and back of the recoil shield. Also removes any slight blemishes in the surface finish.
I think I'll get some copper wool. A while back I bought a rag that's treated with something, supposed to remove lead deposits and I was told it works on the front of the cylinders. But it doesn't work that great and is a real mess, so I'm happy to try another alternative for those areas.

Thanks for the feedback!
 

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You might look into some Wipeout, it will clean copper like nothing I've ever seen. To cut carbon, try carburetor or brake cleaner, but if you use either of those, you will need to oil everything, as it will be squeaky clean. To clean the powde fouling on the face of the cylinder and inside the frame, go to your local auto parts store and get a grey Scotch Brite pad. Grey being the finest. I generally put a good coat of automotive paste wax on all my guns about twice a year, whether they be blued or stainless. Makes them impervious to any water. I always use a muzzle type bore guide when I clean too, unless it's a bolt gun.

Hope this is some help.

Molon Labe

Kim
 

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I do not recommend carburator cleaner. It will melt plastic, remove varnish and other wood finishes. Brake cleaner is OK. The copper wool I use because stainless steel wool is hard to find. Either works well using light pressure and staying with the grain if used on an exterior surface. I do not use 'steel wool' as it can imbed pieces of the steel in the gun pores and actually promote rusting, Or so I was told and don't feel like testing the theory. I don't worry with the black ring on a blued gun as long as the cylinder face is clean.
 

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The last time I looked, there wasn't a lot of plastic on a Ruger revolver and generally when a real clean is done, the grips are removed, so carburetor cleaner works just fine. Scotch Brite pads are a synthetic material and will not harm stainless at all. No problem.


Molon Labe

Kim
 

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I use Hopped #9 I love the smell, I use tansmisson fluid just go to dollar general get some of the sent for oil lamps which ever you like and few drops will fix the smell of the tans fluid. I use s shaving brush thaat I put a few drops of tans fluid on and whipe my guns down. The trans fluid will clean them as never before, its a good lite weight oil. I also use the Hopes snake as well as brushs and cleaning rods run a patch threw them. My cleaning of my fire arms is contuinois one as its my quiet time for me to think things threw. Clear my head of the days problems. Sometimes it takes all nite, or all day. Which ever it is its time well spent. They are never clean enough to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Blade, that stuff looks intriguing. Do you use it on everything? Seems like it's kind of made for black powder?
 

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Eddie, I'm a longtime user of this product. It's pretty good for everything including metal, plastic, wood and leather. Non-toxic and smells well. Just read feedback from other users on Midway.
 
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