Ruger Forum banner

Too valuable to shoot?

  • Yes...it was made to shoot so blast away!

    Votes: 52 73.2%
  • Nope...ruins the value so don't do it!

    Votes: 19 26.8%
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am following Wafeform's suggestion here. I very recently purchased an unfired, in the box Colt Python and I am having some real difficulty deciding if in fact the gun is too valuable to sully by firing it. :confused: I've never owned a gun that I wouldn't shoot so I am somewhat torn and would love to hear your opinion on the matter. Let 'er rip folks! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,450 Posts
Don't shoot Python

I am following Wafeform's suggestion here. I very recently purchased an unfired, in the box Colt Python and I am having some real difficulty deciding if in fact the gun is too valuable to sully by firing it. :confused: I've never owned a gun that I wouldn't shoot so I am somewhat torn and would love to hear your opinion on the matter. Let 'er rip folks! :D
A gun like that is like buying a 1965 GTO with zero miles; one mile hurts the value. If it's an investment don't shoot it, and if you want an excellent condition Python"shooter", like I have, buy one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
I voted yes (with incomplete information). You need to determine why you bought the gun. If you bought it as an investment and expect to be able to see it for more down the road, then you probably shouldn't shoot it.

Otherwise I would enjoy it, maybe just limit the number of rounds.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Jazz Nerd
Joined
·
16,351 Posts
Gunpoor ... Always a tough question. While I personally only buy guns for the purpose of shooting, I have a number of friends who collect and would never consider shooting your Python due to the loss of value. If I found myself in possession of an unfired Python (since I have no interest in collecting) I would resolve the dilemma as follows:
1. Sell the Python to a serious collector who would appreciate it in it's unfired condition.
2. Buy a nice Python "shooter" that I could enjoy each week.
3. Take the remaining money and buy another gun or two on my short list.

Just a thought ... Good luck with your decision :)
 

·
CARSON-WEST - 2016
Joined
·
6,784 Posts
When it comes to collectible guns, if you want a shooter, buy a shooter. Sell it unfired, use the money to buy one that's been shot and the extra money to buy ammo.

Edit: OK, so apparently great Buckeye minds think alike. :)
 

·
Retired Moderator & Jazz Nerd
Joined
·
16,351 Posts
When it comes to collectible guns, if you want a shooter, buy a shooter. Sell it unfired, use the money to buy one that's been shot and the extra money to buy ammo.

Edit: OK, so apparently great Buckeye minds think alike. :)
It's an Ohio Thing :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
I've bought & sold some very nice guns in 60 years, but just couldn't ever justify buying one I couldn't shoot. It seems somehow wrong to own a piece of precision equipment like a Python, & never have had the pleasure of actually shooting it ! Just seems like such a waste to me. I just can't justify "saving it" for someone else to enjoy, or I wouldn't have bought it to start with.

But hey, it has to be your decision, no one elses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
It is your gun so I have no right to tell you how to use or care for them.

I used to have a couple of handguns I never shot because I liked them too much, thought they were valuable etc, etc.
For some reason my attitude towards them changed and I now treat them as tools.
I take the best care of them I can but I am sure as heck going to use them.

Unless a gun is really valuable and/or rare, like up into the 5 figures, as long as it is cared for it really won't lose a lot of value.
I have a 15 year old Sig P229 40 cal. Today they sell for around $800 to $925. I have no idea what I paid for it.
This old P229 is still worth around $500 so I've lost only $400 or so in 15 years on one of the best guns I own. I shoot it weekly and enjoy the heck out of it.
Externally it looks brand new. I can always buy new internals for it if and when they wear out.

Life is good.

This of course is just my opinion.
My philosophy is to just enjoy them, however that may be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
I voted to shoot it. Treat it with extreme care, show it off, but enjoy shooting it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
29,619 Posts
I own valuable firearms and shoot them but if I owned an unfired 30k dollars plus firearm I would not shoot it and loose the money or remove another unfired collectors item. i would sell th4 unfired one and buy a fired one current firearms owners have a responsibilty to future generations. If I found an unfired Winchester model 1876 in a rare configuration I should not shoot it to preserve it for future generations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Too valuable to shoot by my own definition would be any firearm that is limited or rare and worth at least 5K or more. I have several 1911's that are at the 4 to 5K mark new but I shoot them all because I sure as heck didn't buy them as investments nor do I ever plan on selling any of them! I say unless you have a special limited issue high end gun or collectible antique go ahead and shoot the darned thing! That Python is a standard production run gun that was mass manufactured and is by no means rare! I certainly don't see it as a "safe queen" but rather a high quality revolver that was meant to do one thing... shoot! Being unfired will somewhat add to it's value but IMHO not enough to offset the "fun factor" of what it was meant to do.....shoot & shoot well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
965 Posts
I am following Wafeform's suggestion here. I very recently purchased an unfired, in the box Colt Python and I am having some real difficulty deciding if in fact the gun is too valuable to sully by firing it. :confused: I've never owned a gun that I wouldn't shoot so I am somewhat torn and would love to hear your opinion on the matter. Let 'er rip folks! :D
I would not shoot it! At least not that gun.
I would hold on to it for a few years and sell it at a profit.
Now if you didn't need the money you could pass it down to your grandkids and they could shoot it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
A few years ago I purchased a NOS/NIB T-Series Browning Renaissance Hi-Power. IMHO it's a darn good looking pistol with the round hammer, factory engraving and white grips. My range buddies were surprised when I took the gun to the range and shot it. THis is one of my carry guns when I can and my favorite BBQ gun too.

I consider myself to be a gun accumulator not a collector. If a gun is a an investment, which means to hold and make money when you sell it then do that. If you admire the gun, then shoot the heck out of it.

There are still many NIB/NOS Colts for sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,617 Posts
Well Gunpoor I'm afraid I too only buy guns that I plan on shooting. Never had the money to buy a non-shooter for investment purposes so my thinking is only onesided...sorry I couldn't help.

Now I love my GP100 to the moon and back but if I came across a Colt Python I would definately be taking it to the range for a dance...;)

However I do agree with the options that Buck described earlier. That's most likely the road I would travel. I'm a shooter not a collector...

Good luck with your quest!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,504 Posts
I believe in driving classic cars and shooting classic guns.

I would not buy these things as an investment so I would use them carefully and enjoy the experience.

When I'm gone I won't know or care what happens as far as value.
 

·
Registered
Northwest Oregon
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
If there is proof that it is unfired and the cylinder is unturned, I would sell it and buy one that I would shoot. If there is only word of mouth that it is unfired, I would shoot it and enjoy it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
I own valuable firearms and shoot them but if I owned an unfired 30k dollars plus firearm I would not shoot it and loose the money or remove another unfired collectors item. i would sell th4 unfired one and buy a fired one current firearms owners have a responsibilty to future generations. If I found an unfired Winchester model 1876 in a rare configuration I should not shoot it to preserve it for future generations.
If it's worth $30K unfired and drops in price after being fired, I hereby change my vote to "sell it to anyone who is willing to pay that much for it". I do not know anything about this gun and had no idea it was that valuable.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top