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Wasn't sure where to post this question so feel free to move it.

I've been curious about the guns used on TV and in the movies. Since live rounds wouldn't be used on the set of a movie and blanks are used, do they use a real gun that had been modified so it can't shoot live ammo, or are these guns made just for this purpose. And since most of the guns you see are of a semi auto type, how do they get the blanks to feed and cycle the action. Would one of thes guns be legal to own for an individual? Where could I get one and who makes blanks of them?
 

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The IMDB film website actually lists many guns and what movies they're found in.

I understand that "Hollywood" guns are looked after very carefully, with regards to safety and theft. Revolvers are usually stock real guns, using blanks. As for semi-autos, I've heard two tales which may be right or wrong. One is that they shoot wax or paper wads as resistance to make them cycle, the other is that the barrel is plugged up to make the resistance. That one would eliminate the muzzle flash you still see sometimes (?).

I do understand that a gunshot is very difficult to record realistically, because of the shockwave, so most are "dubbed in" after the scene is filmed.

My favorite movie gun is the revolver with a silencer, second only to the "thousand shooter" in many of the old Westerns..........:D
 

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Don't they just use prop guns? They have a blowback action and everything. Then they use CGI to put in the muzzle flash and other effects to make it seem real.
 

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The IMDB film website actually lists many guns and what movies they're found in.

I understand that "Hollywood" guns are looked after very carefully, with regards to safety and theft. Revolvers are usually stock real guns, using blanks. As for semi-autos, I've heard two tales which may be right or wrong. One is that they shoot wax or paper wads as resistance to make them cycle, the other is that the barrel is plugged up to make the resistance. That one would eliminate the muzzle flash you still see sometimes (?).

I do understand that a gunshot is very difficult to record realistically, because of the shockwave, so most are "dubbed in" after the scene is filmed.

My favorite movie gun is the revolver with a silencer, second only to the "thousand shooter" in many of the old Westerns..........:D
Um you do realize there actually is a real silenced revolver right???

Silenced 1895 Nagant revolver (NFA) - YouTube

The cylinder moves forward during firing to seal the gap between cylinder/forcing cone.
 

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The cylinder moves forward during firing to seal the gap between cylinder/forcing cone.
But not on the snubbies you see silenced in movies.......:eek:

Nagants were a neat idea, but no real improvement in performance. My local Gander had several for $185 recently, not sure how much fun it would be getting ammo for them.
 

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I dont know what they use in movies and on TV, but I do know that blanks fire wadding. When I was a teenager, a friend of mine got a hold of a bunch of 22 blanks for a stater pistol for races, and things like that. We were playing with them, with a real 22 pistol ,and within a close range, that wadding would sting. We actually decided it was not the smartest thing to be doing and stopped. I really think if one of us had been hit in the face it could have done damage to the eyes.
 

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Sometimes on a show like Tour of Duty you get a good closeup nd can se where a weapon is plugged to shoot blanks.
 

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Some are plugged, and some are 'replicas' that don't shoot standard ammo, and are designed to look like 'big name' guns, but can't be loaded with deadly rounds. They look different than the 'real steel'. IMFDB is a great resource. I use it alot.
 
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