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Can anyone point me to a good screwdriver I can buy online for working on guns. I have a receiver to replace that is held on by highly visible enameled black screws and I am really afraid of getting them all scarred up.
 

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I purchased a set of Grace Gunsmith Screwdrivers...but then I use them regularly.

Try this one: Lyman Magdriver Gunsmithing Screwdriver Set w/ Mag Tip | eBay

Go s.l.o.w when working on face screws...fit the screwdriver tip carefully...they're often designed specifically for each gun and would probably be difficult, if not impossible, to replace.
 

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I went for efficiency with Wheeler Engineering bits. I measured all of my screw slots with a ruler and clearance gauges. Then I bought just the bits that fit and a handle. Turned out that all I needed was seven bits, and a Ruger basepin latch bit that they also make. The bits come three to a pack, for $3.99 IIRC, so you have spares. Ran me about $45 total. I've never had any complaint with them, never needed one of the spare bits.

The hard part was finding the bit dimensions. They're not on Wheeler's site. Midway lists the bits, and clicking each one, it gives the dimensions. Took a while to scribble a list and order.

I've since added T-10 bits for my LCRs, but they are easy at a local hardware. The cylinder latch screw needed a long shaft screwdriver, and I found a 3/32" electricians screwdriver at the same hardware. I had to file it narrower.
 

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Screwdrivers for gunsmithing is not rocket science. I've found as soon as the label "for gunsmithing" is attached, the price skyrockets but you get exactly the same products sold in other sets.

There are two basic types of flat tip screwdrivers ... one has a "tapered" tip, the other has a "hollow ground" tip. Taper tips are typically used for wood screws and should not be used for gun screws. Hollow ground tips are used for machine screws, like those found in guns. The only exception for guns that I can think of is screws used to hold a butt plate, which are wood screws that use a tapered tip.

With the popularity of hex bits, you can find high quality hollow ground tip bits and handles at very modest prices. Most are sold in a set but you can also buy the bits separately. I have a Craftsman's set that cost about $15 and included 8 flat tip hollow ground bits in varying sizes, #0, #1, #2, and #3 Phillips bits, plus T-10, T-15, and T-20 Torks bits. It also included a nice handle that has a "lock in" shaft that secures the bits without using a magnet. I've found the bit sockets that use magnets are a real pain because the screw will get magnetized, which can make inserting a screw into a hole a major challenge.

I would avoid the cheap Chinese tools (ie Harbor Freight) and stay with quality US brand name tools because the bits are hardened and don't end up twisting when you remove a tight screw.

The concept for the "right tool for the right job" is simple. Find a bit that is almost as wide as the screw head. If it is too wide, you will mar the area surrounding the screw and if the bit is too narrow, you will likely damage the screw slot. In addition to width, you want a bit with the proper thickness that best fits the screw slot. Again. if you use a bit that is too thin, you may damage the screw slot. You may find gun screws with very narrow slots. This is very common with guns such as a Browning A5 shotgun and many other European made guns. The solution is quite simple ... either buy a special bit or use a bench grinder and shape a thicker bit down to size. #8-10 flat tip hex bits are very inexpensive and serve well for custom bits. Rugers all use conventional hollow ground standard sizes, with the exception of SAs split tip screws in the base pin latch. If you are handy, you can make a split tip bit out of a donor bit. If not, Brownell's sells a special split tip bit for S&W rear sights that works perfect.
 

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I too have had a number of suggested screwdrivers and still use a Chapman set (although it's my third as the bits are brittle and tend to brake). I do keep all my old bits in case I ever have to grind a special one to fit an odd screw slot. My best luck has come from Brownells and their Magnatip screwdrivers. Here
Brownells Search : Search Results for "magnatip" - World's Largest Supplier of Firearm Accessories, Gun Parts and Gunsmithing Tools - BROWNELLS is a link to five pages of different combinations of Magnatip products. What I've often done is to select which bits I need for a particular gun and buy a hollow handle and wallah I now have a custom screwdriver for that gun. Smithy.
 

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Yes, hollow ground bits and even a simple B-Square set is affordable and
good for most gun folks.
If you wish to get fancy, and not necessarily pricey, look at the german made
WIHA
Wiha Professional Quality Tools Home Page

I prefer the handles on Wiha to almost all my others, micro and regular....
even my electrical tools.
 

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I have both a Chapman set and a set of Grace hollow ground screwdrivers. Both work well! I also hollow grind my own for special applications.
 

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I have a Pachmayr set and they are really nice. Nothing more than a 1/4" nut driver with all the hollow ground tips you will ever need.
 

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I bought this set from Midsouth.
Deluxe 89 Piece Professional*Gunsmithing Screwdriver Set | MidsouthShootersSupply.com

I searched several shooters suppliers and Midsouth had the best price on this Wheeler set.

I've only used it a couple times but I'm very satisfied with them so far.
I have the same set, bought two years ago.

Gun makers still manage to frustrate though by seemingly trying to use ever size screw under the sun such that even that mega-set still won't fit all.
 
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