Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to gun ownership but already getting rather obsessive about it. I purchased a new GP100 match champion model 1786 (the one with the rubber grip and full lug) about 3 months ago and after some trips to the range and a lot of dry firing I noticed a scrape on the side of the hammer hammer.jpg that seems to line up with the internal surfacing. interal surface.jpg It seems like it could be knocking/slapping rather than scraping. There is also some minor circular scratches along the base of the same side of the hammer. hammer base.jpg This model is supposed to have some shims if I understand correctly, or whatever this problem is might be fixed with shims. Maybe it is caused by shims? Is this something I should send back or pay to have a gunsmith look at? Resurfacing, gapping and shimming doesn't seem like a big deal, but I'm a noob and don't want to lose a spring or void a warranty or something, plus I don't even know if that is an appropriate solution. The scratches themselves are not very serious, but I don't know if it is a symptom of something to come and I don't want them to keep coming back either.

Apologies in advance if this isn't supposed to be a support forum. I have plans for making it nicer, (grips, springs and sights) but I figure I should take care of any initial problems it might have first. I need some direction in where to point my attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
If you are comfortable with taking off the grips and removing the hammer. It’s a pretty easy job to check for burrs in the hammer pivot area and measure the clearance between the frame and hammer. Feeler gauges are the only tool necessary for the job. Triggershims.com has a lot of good information on the subject. Of course a gun smith is a good option if you don’t want to attempt the job yourself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not too afraid of some DIY except for the flying springs. I need some feeler gauges and punches anyways. The hammer might just be wiggling onto it, maybe from cocking it. That's the only notable scratch and I'm not sure if a scouring pad or brush will get rid of it before taking off a 1/1000th or something and having to remeasure the gap. So I'll have to disassemble, brush/scour/resurface the side of the hammer, reassemble, measure, disassemble, shim, reassemble, then see if it comes back and then I can worry about the frame burr then do all that over.

Haha, yeah I'll go to a gunsmith. This is going to be like Macbeth otherwise. I'll work on it myself in the future when a little scratch doesn't promise to drive me up the wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
No flying spring worries with taking the hammer out and shimming. No punch is needed to remove hammer assembly(pivot pin). It pushes out easily after the spring/strut is removed. To remove hammer and spring/strut assembly: Take the grip screw out and remove the grip Cock the hammer and insert the pin in the hole in the hammer strut. De cock the hammer and remove the hammer strut and spring. Take notice of the orientation of the of the strut ("claw" goes to the front). To shim: push the hammer to one side and measure the gap between hammer and frame. Divide gap by 2 and subtract .002 for clearance. Example: If you measure .014 divided by 2=.007 minus 2=.005. A .005 shim on either side. There's no need to remove the trigger assembly for this. It's very easy and no need to pay a gunsmith for this, plus you'll get to know your gun. Using 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper(with the grain) will remove the scratches on the hammer. My experience from owning 5 new Ruger SA/DA revolvers is it's best not to be too obsessive(don't look too closely) about minor flaws especially cosmetic. I accept them for what they are, strong, well built, reliable and affordable revolvers. Edit: After looking at you first photo it looks like a burr on the inside the frame could be causing this. Check that first. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,575 Posts
stonebuster gives you some real good information. I put shims in my GP100 hammer. Can't recall exactly what thickness, but was able to get one on one side and two on the other. No more scuffing on the sides of the hammer. When you go to install the shims in the revolver, put a dab of heavy grease on the sides of the hammer and the shims. It helps hold the shims in place until you can get the hammer positioned and the pivot pin slipped through the frame and hammer. Also as stonebuster states, I have managed to become less obsessive about Ruger handguns. If you are going to use them and enjoy them, they are going to get a few marks on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
After shimming the hammer on my GP100 (non Match Champion) I noted that the hammer did not wiggle, but still scrapped a little. I took a fine file and some fine sandpaper and worked on where the scrap was. I worked very carefully, over a period of a couple of months until the scrapping was gone. The Match Champion comes with hammer shims, but not necessarily enough to solve all the problems. And if the hammer pin hole is just a tiny bit off perpendicular with the frame you might still get a little scrapping. at Triggershims.com there are videos to show you how to measure and install the shims. It is really very easy and it is good to take your gun apart to check it all out - I found an impressive burr near the trigger group of my Match Champion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Hi Ct,
I'd look inside the frame and see if you can find a burr or something that is making those marks on the hammer. A piece of emery paper starting with lower numbers and advancing to higher, finer grit, may take down the high spot with a bit of work. The emery paper could be wrapped on a popsicle stick for more precise work. I'd suggest 300 grit to start, I've used 1200 grit to polish mine in the past so that's a good number to finish with. After that is fixed, polishing the hammer will finish the job.
Best,
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
OK, it sounds like it is not as annoying as I was thinking, but I'm still going to have to wait for feeler gauges and shims and probably procrastinate a little bit. The "burr" looks like a transfer from a cast surface to a ground down surface on the frame. "Feeling" around with the feeler gauges should tell me what is actually going on. Not ruining it with obsessiveness means I'll work on the frame burr before polishing the side of the hammer. I'll use a popsicle stick and emery paper and if that doesn't work I will, very carefully, use a rasp.

I'm kind of just listing what I'll do so I have a plan and someone can stop me if it sounds wrong since I am a newb playing with tolerances to solve a cosmetic issue. Also, is there such a thing as smaller feeler gauges? Thinner as in, uh, more pokey? I don't know what word to use for "thinner" since they are feeler gauges, but the other dimension of thinness. They might be too easily mangled to actually exist.

edit: My new concern is that there are two surfaces on the frame at two different angles causing the contact point. Grinding the existing contact point would just move it, which I would find out by the wear mark moving on the hammer after going with previous plan. Shimming according to that contact point seems like the better answer, so I'll try that first since it doesn't involve removing material.

edit 2: OK, I'm overthinking it. I'm going to grind that part of the frame with emery paper, shim the hammer and not much can even go wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Welcome to the forum and to hand gunning.

I've never owned a GP100 but I have had a couple of Ruger SP101's which are like a little sister.
These are production pistols so everything is a compromise of cost and customer acceptability.

The bear that your poking is the natural path that most firearms folks find themselves on eventually.
Some are in quest of a lighter trigger pull, a smoother action, or better accuracy.

When you see something like the drag marks on a hammer, rest assured that is making for a rougher overall "feel" at the trigger.
I'm compulsive about the looks of my firearms so those drag marks would bother me too.
Trust me, when you get that squared away you will notice smoother action.

All of the work that you can do on the inside of your Ruger, smoothing, polishing, and shimming is the exact things that make a hand built pistol cost twice or three times as much as a production pistol.

There are lots of YouTube videos that will walk you through this process. There are also kits for reduced weight springs and shims. Most of the work is simple and enjoyable if you like to tinker with stuff.

For me, it's a fascinating aspect of the hobby.
You have the support of this forum and also excellent Customer Service from Ruger.

Let us know how it works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,237 Posts
Two statements ... " I will very carefully use a RASP " and "I'm going to grind the frame "
Think and rethink these actions ...once the metal is gone ...it's gone !
Stay away from Dremel tool ...it can get away from you and mess up a gun so fast it will make your head spin .
No rasp ... Swiss needle file at most , a stone is even better ... be careful , go slow and good luck .
The little marks on the side of a hammer aren't a proplem just a sign of a close fit , you can just put a drop of oil on each side of the hammer and carry on , I swear it will be just fine .
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
Hi Ct,
I'd look inside the frame and see if you can find a burr or something that is making those marks on the hammer. A piece of emery paper starting with lower numbers and advancing to higher, finer grit, may take down the high spot with a bit of work. The emery paper could be wrapped on a popsicle stick for more precise work. I'd suggest 300 grit to start, I've used 1200 grit to polish mine in the past so that's a good number to finish with. After that is fixed, polishing the hammer will finish the job.
Best,
Rob
Thanks for your good advice; I've done all of that. There was no burr, but the hammer was sitting not quite centered even after shimming. I did not take a file to my hammer without trying other solutions. My father was a Tool & Die Maker, so I inherited a nice colection of fine little files and stones and I finished up the job with 400 grit paper (did not use a popcicle stick) and hit the hammer with the buffing wheel on my dremel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
I was going to recommend the mcarbo spring kit. It comes with shims. Sometimes you can get those light Mark's and not need shims. I would shoot the piss out of it then buff the Mark's with 0000 wool. About 500 rounds should mate all the surfaces enough that nothing further is going to show up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
I just went back and saw it's a match champion. Have ruger take care of it. The money you paid for a match gun that should not be happening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Two statements ... " I will very carefully use a RASP " and "I'm going to grind the frame "
Think and rethink these actions ...once the metal is gone ...it's gone !
Yeah, just subtly revealing my cluelessness. I thought rasps were the rounded files. I wouldn't want the sharp corners on there. I'll stick to emery paper with a popsicle stick. The guy I work for is a mechanical engineer, metal worker that used to work at a ballistics lab. He lets me say dumb stuff constantly, so I just keep doing that. I'm just a schmo that has resurfaced some stuff and drilled some holes. I am just barely qualified enough to be self aware.
There are lots of YouTube videos that will walk you through this process. There are also kits for reduced weight springs and shims. Most of the work is simple and enjoyable if you like to tinker with stuff.
I had watched an hour long video of a trigger job and polish and shim on a sp101 or gp100 like a month ago, so I feel like I slept at a Holiday Inn last night. That's why I know of shimming. Replacing the springs seems easier than the full disassembly and polishing. Technically the Match Champion is supposed to have polished internals, so I'll try to get away with just doing the springs though I would imagine polishing myself would still help quite a bit. I'll do it along with a deep clean at some point. My other plans are meprolight tritium dot sites and rounded badger sport grips. I found this place discovering that those grips exist, that he will round them off. I'm making it halfway into a conceal carry gun, which won't quite be feasible, so I'll have an excuse to buy another gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I just went back and saw it's a match champion. Have ruger take care of it. The money you paid for a match gun that should not be happening.
This particular match champion isn't as expensive as the others, only like $50-100 over the stock models, which themselves are quite expensive at the moment. It is going to be expensive by the time I'm done with it or at least look like it and act like it. I'll try shooting them an email. I'd rather have it gone for a few weeks than have to wussyfoot sanding down a burr over a few months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
This particular match champion isn't as expensive as the others, only like $50-100 over the stock models, which themselves are quite expensive at the moment. It is going to be expensive by the time I'm done with it or at least look like it and act like it. I'll try shooting them an email. I'd rather have it gone for a few weeks than have to wussyfoot sanding down a burr over a few months.
Make sure to ask them about turn around time as they were backed up and very slow during the virus outbreak. Since it's a minor issue, maybe enjoy shooting your MC until they get on a normal schedule before sending it. I wouldn't be surprised if they said it was only cosmetic and may not fix it. Both my GP100s have hammers that showed drag marks but maybe a Match Champion is held to a higher standard. In answer to your question in post #8, I got an inexpensive set of feeler gauges at our local automotive supply store which have worked well for my hand guns. While your at it, measure your B/C gap(barrel/cylinder) to make sure it's within specs. No matter what, a set of feeler gauges is something you should have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
My GP 100 Match Champ also had some rub marks on the side of the hammer. While I had it apart changing out springs and polishing, I am not very mechanical, but going slow and steady, and watching YouTube videos, it worked! I used fine wet or dry paper with oil on a piece of glass to lightly polish the sides of the hammer...easy does it!. I also stoned the inside of the frame where it was rubbing, and bought a set of shims from Triggershims.com,(No relationship, except for being a satisfied customer!) because the factory shims were too skinny.
Oil/grease on the hammer holds the shims for installation, but it is easy, if you are ham-handed like me, to knock one or the other loose. When I get the hammer/shims in the frame, I take a high-tech tool (a bamboo skewer);) to line up shims and holes for installing the hammer pivot pin. So far, so good... if there appear any more rub marks on the hammer, I may or may not work on them the next time I have the revolver apart. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
As others have said, there is almost certainly a burr along the edge of the hammer channel in the frame. It will be right up at the edge, along the top. Cleaning it up will have zero effect on any of the dimensions involved in the shimming concept.

Norton India stones will work well for this. Brownells and Midway sell them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
One caution - don't try to polish the sear engagement surfaces (the hooks that stop the hammer falling). Angles and finish are critical, and us amateurs won't improve on the factory without jigs and skill, and can easily ruin it. Grittiness will largely work itself out with firing (dry or live), or do a "poorman's trigger job"- applying gentle forward pressure on the hammer why firing it a few times will speed up the smoothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
On inspection my GP 100 does have some scratch marks on the side of the hammer but having purchased it in 1996 I am not able to say if they were there when the gun purchased, but for sure IMHO they have not lessened the gun's accuracy which I can say has improved with use.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top