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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a suspicion I'm not alone in this quest.
Does anybody else throw a quick squirt/blast/dose of case lube onto their handgun brass before resizing in carbide sizer?

I think I read about this on the 1911 forum, it sure makes .45 ACP go so much smoother & quicker. I put two quick squirts on a batch of 100 9mm, wow, super smooth & quick.
 

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I have to ask what is the benefit of lubing straight cases in ordinary carbide dies? It's hard to ask without sounding snarky.

I have not lubed handgun brass with carbide dies. I do not have any real resistance sizing cases in carbide dies. The only case I routinely lube is 357 SIG. I'm too poor to afford carbine dies for that one.

I use a 550 with Lyman sizer in 45 ACP. Got a couple of sets of Lee dies. The balance are Dillon's. I have the mechanical advantage of a larger press in the Dillon with relatively small cartridge case.

Added: I do load many hundreds of 45 ACP (among others) at a time on the Dillon. Or did load hundreds until the crooks dominated the primer business.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have to ask what is the benefit of lubing straight cases in ordinary carbide dies? It's hard to ask without sounding snarky.

I have not lubed handgun brass with carbide dies. I do not have any real resistance sizing cases in carbide dies. The only case I routinely lube is 357 SIG. I'm too poor to afford carbine dies for that one.

use a 550 with Lyman sizer in 45 ACP. Got a couple of sets of Lee dies. The balance are Dillon's. I have the mechanical advantage of a larger press in the Dillon with relatively small cases.
The easiest way to splain it: Buttery smooth, like a perfect trigger pull.
 

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Normally I don't. But one cartridge I do use lube is when sizing the first time (new brass) and that is .32 H&R Magnum. Once fired, not a problem as the residue (inside) does the job of lube.
 

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I never lube my brass with carbide dies,
that is why I paid extra for them. I do
clean my dies occasionally to get the
brass out of them. I also admit that I
am tempted sometimes to lube
Starline brass but don’t. I have started
to clean the inside of my brass by
Installing a bore brush on my 3 in 1
Case Prep Tool and making that a
part of my primer pocket cleaning
step. It really helps during the case
mouth widening to keep the brass
from being sticky in the die.
 

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I not relating to the smooth business. I have used carbide dies in a RC press and 550 for many years experience. I see this lubing issue as extra steps.

The advent of the carbide dies-I have been loading for several years- had to do with a durable ways to size cases without lube. What I mean by durable is that nickle cases could steel dies seriously. This lubing handgun brass has the smell on internet reloading dogma. I have never dropped out in exhaustion resizing handgun cases. No need or purpose in lubing with carbide dies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I not relating to the smooth business. I have used carbide dies in a RC press and 550 for many years experience. I see this lubing issue as extra steps.

The advent of the carbide dies-I have been loading for several years- had to do with a durable ways to size cases without lube. What I mean by durable is that nickle cases could steel dies seriously. This lubing handgun brass has the smell on internet reloading dogma. I have never dropped out in exhaustion resizing handgun cases. No need or purpose in lubing with carbide dies.
It's all good. I read about it, tried it with .45 ACP and realized how much smoother it went. Next step was with .357 brass, then for S&G, tried it with 9mm. I use spray bottle mix, so I'm not spending time lubing cases, two squirts, shake the tub, and get under way.
I usually toss brass in the tumbler and let it go a few hours, decap at some point, clean the primer pockets some other time, then toss into finishing tumbler which has media & polish already mixed. It's purty and ready to go then.
I run several hundred cases of each cartridge at any given time, so brass is always in a phase until it gets back into the ready bucket, then the cycle starts again.
 

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I can see where lubing cases for carbide die sizing could be a thing but I don't see it in my future. Never say never though. My last big lesson was not buying threaded barrels when they were an available option for a little bit more. Now playing catch up it's a lot more. Anyway do what you enjoy it's practical advantages seem to be limited to me. I don't need to add another step or two if you include cleaning off any extra lube.

I tumble my brass just to get it clean not for the new brass shine. It's to get rid of crud that might interfere or scratch my carbide ring. I usually don't think a lot about the reloading steps but sometimes I do. I like the feel and resistance of resizing. The thought of squeezing the brass down back to shape. I've redone brass I wasn't sure got resized and the feedback lets you know if it was or not. I see lubing as a detriment there as it would be a more subtle difference.

To each his own. Whatever you do just be safe.
 

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My revolver brass rarely hits the ground and is in small enough batches (usually 100 or less) that I do not often lube it before sizing with a carbide die. Anything in a large batch gets sprayed with lube before sizing. I had read somewhere that it would make life easier and decided to try doing that when I uncovered 1,400 once fired Federal .45acp cases in a bunch of reloading stuff that I inherited, it really helped. Normally I clean handgun brass after having sized and flared it so there is no lube left on the cases. Grungy brass gets cleaned before sizing and again after sizing and flaring so removing the lube isn't a problem either way (I know, there are lubes that 'don't have to be removed' but being old I am set in my ways) but for smaller numbers it doesn't seem worth getting my hands all 'lubed' (that's when the phone will ring or I will want to write something down ...) handling the brass.

Bruce
 

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I don't lube handgun brass. My brass is deprimed and wet steel pin tumbled then dried and sized. And the carbide die makes it even brighter.
 

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I found 5 boxes of new unprimed WW .357 brass at a garage sale, When I went to reload it, it would not go thru my carbide dies without risking breaking off the bottom of the case, Took them to a commercial reloader who tried putting them thru his Dillon. Same problem. Used a shot od case lube and they went thru with ease,
 

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My handgun brass gets a good cleaning before I do any reloading. The "short" rounds, like 9mm, .40, or .45 ACP don't see any lube. With the longer cases like .41 or .45 Colt, I finger lube 5 or 6 with Imperial out of a box of 50. It does speed up the sizing IMO and it's a simple matter to wipe the lube off before priming.

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 
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