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I’m in the same camp as Rugerfan57. I’ll spray the brass on the loading block.
I normally use RCBS carbide dies but I also have some Hornady Nitride dies. Lube isn’t necessary but it sure does help. Not something I used to do but I do now.
 

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When I started loading I don't remember carbide being available so I started with lubing and just kept going also the .41 magnum and the .45 Colt are the only carbide set I have the others are regular steel. I don't load that many straight walled hand gun cases for lubing to be an issue also I use Hornady or Imperial wax also it gives me another opportunity to inspect the brass.
 

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I have a suspicion I'm not alone in this quest.
Does anybody else throw a quick squirt/blast/dose of case lube onto their handgun brass before resizing in carbide sizer?

I think I read about this on the 1911 forum, it sure makes .45 ACP go so much smoother & quicker. I put two quick squirts on a batch of 100 9mm, wow, super smooth & quick.
I have been doing it for decades , in the 1960's carbide sizing dies were horribly expensive , no one I knew used them and being in high school all me and buddies could afford was steel ... Then Lee hit the market with a cheap carbide sizers and we replaced our steel ones when we had the money . Lee would sell just the carbide die so you didn't have to buy a complete set .
But after a while you noticed sizing with carbide wasn't as slick or easy as with lubed steel and spray case lubes got popular ... a little spritz of lube sure made those carbide dies work slicker and easier ,
Some of the carbide dies sized cases down too much , not 45 acp but the tapered 9mm Luger ... I went back to steel die and case lube on it ...but everything else gets some form of spray on lube ... Lee case lube dissolved in alcohol and spritzed on works like Gangbusters !
Gary
 

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What sort of loading press do you guys use? With all that's going on with a Dillon it's had to tease out the effort to size a case from all else t hat's going on. . I may be blessed but I promise you there's no need here in the Skunk Works to lube cases with carbide dies on my 550's. I have not loaded handgun rounds on a single stage press in many years.

To me "makes it easier" is some sort of non-statement. Round here loading straight wall cases is not difficult. I just don't see the lubing. as having any meaning benefit, I cannot recall any common handgun carbide die that comes with instructions to lube case. I do buy that lubing the cases is an optional loading step if you see the need. I don't.
 

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Ruger .44 Carbine, Security-Six, Service-Six, Mini-14, .30 Carbine Blackhawk
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I do not lube any straight walled pistol cases. I find no difficulty in sizing them.
I use a Hornady Press and dies, perhaps the titanium nitride dies are the reason.
 
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What sort of loading press do you guys use? With all that's going on with a Dillon it's had to tease out the effort to size a case from all else t hat's going on. . I may be blessed but I promise you there's no need here in the Skunk Works to lube cases with carbide dies on my 550's. I have not loaded handgun rounds on a single stage press in many years.

To me "makes it easier" is some sort of non-statement. Round here loading straight wall cases is not difficult. I just don't see the lubing. as having any meaning benefit, I cannot recall any common handgun carbide die that comes with instructions to lube case. I do buy that lubing the cases is an optional loading step if you see the need. I don't.
My Press Line up :

Pacific Super Deluxe - single stage C - standard reloading operations .
Eagle Cobra 300 - single stage C - heavy duty sizing / forming
Lyman All American Turret - turret press - handgun ammo
Lee Hand Press - single stage C light duty - I have two and use them in place of Lee Classic (Whack-A-Mole) loaders ,,, no pounding inside the house required with the hand press . Load all handgun & 30-30 Win. with them sitting at desk inside house w/ AC and Heat .

I like a little lube ... makes "things" slide in and slide out easier ...Think About It !
Gary
 

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I simply have a Hornady Classic Single Stage.
When I started reloading everyone said, buy a progressive, you are gonna get one eventually anyways.......

Well, here I am 15yrs later and still perfectly happy with my single stage and the red koolaid is still good.
 

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I simply have a Hornady Classic Single Stage.
When I started reloading everyone said, buy a progressive, you are gonna get one eventually anyways.......

Well, here I am 15yrs later and still perfectly happy with my single stage and the red koolaid is still good.
Progressive presses were not quite so common when I started reloading in the early 70's. By the 80's I was thinking about one but firefighter pay didn't leave enough extra for the Dillon I thought I 'needed'. Now, nearly 50 years in, my single stage still gets it done for what I need. I am occasionally tempted to find a different single stage that actually contains spent primers rather than launch them here and there like my Rockchucker tends to do ... then I think about resetting 40 odd sets of dies to match a new press and the idea fades.

Bruce
 

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I don't normally lube my handgun brass before sending it through the carbide die, though I'm sure it would be a lot smoother if I did.

One exception, and it's not handgun, is my .30 Carbine. I have carbide dies for that, but it still works a lot better if I lube every 4th or 5th case.

I use an RCBS lube pad and Redding case lube.

I may think about spray lube though...

Aqualung
 
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First up, most of my reloading rear was bought per-owned/used. For handgun it's two Dillon 550's and a Lee Classic Turret set up for 44 Magnum. The first 550 was rebuilt from a 450 using Dillon conversion kit. I have not loaded handgun rounds on a single stage in years. I have tool heads for all my handgun rounds. Also, made up tool head for 38 Special and 44 Special in addition to tool heads for Magnums. Same for 40 S&W and 10mm. I have just assembled a tool head for the new Lee four die sets with carbide factory crimping die.

Lube for rifle rounds is either Imperial or current RCBS lube. Depends on the application. Lube on rifle rounds only. I am surprised at the number of reloader's who lube brass for carbide dies.

Rifle rounds are loaded on a old RC press and very rarely on a Co-Ax. I have made a solemn promise to self not to set one 550 for SPP and the other LPP. That did not last. Right now one press is set for 38 Special and the other for 41 Magnum. I'm not doing any handgun reloading until this primer famine passes-not paying rip-off prices.

Added: I'm not a fanboy of Dillon. I have been using one for twenty plus years. This was a time before the Kool-Aid really kicked in.
 

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Progressive presses were not quite so common when I started reloading in the early 70's. By the 80's I was thinking about one but firefighter pay didn't leave enough extra for the Dillon I thought I 'needed'. Now, nearly 50 years in, my single stage still gets it done for what I need. I am occasionally tempted to find a different single stage that actually contains spent primers rather than launch them here and there like my Rockchucker tends to do ... then I think about resetting 40 odd sets of dies to match a new press and the idea fades.

Bruce
My Hornady catches the primers.
Dillon makes fine reloading equipment,
But Dillon owners are like Glock owners, if you say anything negative about Dillon, they take it personally, like you insulted their mother. 😂
 

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YEP as to a squirt of case lube on brass headed for a carbide sizer...makes the press run smoother, and the post reloading towel rubdown in finished rounds...a lot easier. ...Rod
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I de-cap everything on the Forster Co-Ax with Dillon, Hornady and Lee carbide sizer dies. And assemble rifle and heavy magnum on it as well.

All other operations and assembly is done on a Lyman AA8.
 

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For loading volumes of handgun rounds Dillon is very efficient. I like Dillon. However, for much of my reloading an single stage press is necessary, I'm an still surprised at the number of people who lube using carbide dies. I understand what being said about lubing brass with carbide dies. Maybe, just maybe, sharing what press was being used may have put a slightly different spin on the discussion. Before the primer famine I was using a minimum of 300 rounds of 45ACP monthly alone.

There were other rounds in t he monthly mix also. No thanks on attacking that mess with a single stage press.. I shoot, or shot, often not too long ago. I kept those two 550's busy. Your points have been well made about using lube with carbide dies. However, I'm not going to change. I still do not see lubing brass for carbide dies as part of my reloading.

I also recall very clearly when Lee introduced economical carbide dies. Right there Lee changed the reloading industry. The original Lee dies were too short for a Dillon tool head if the lock ring was used on top One local guy explained how lock ring could be put on the bottom of the die. The lock ring was up against the bottom of the tool head. End of problems. Later, Lee carbide dies were made longer.
 

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I simply have a Hornady Classic Single Stage.
When I started reloading everyone said, buy a progressive, you are gonna get one eventually anyways.......

Well, here I am 15yrs later and still perfectly happy with my single stage and the red koolaid is still good.
Me Too ... but it's been 50+ years (1967) .
I load too many different calibers ... the Lyman All-American Turret I rescued from a flea market is the nearest thing to a "progressive" I have , it stays set up for 357 Magnum ... but the press was a rescue , it was in terrible rusty and neglected condition when it called out to me ... Please ...Save Me , take me home , love me .... what could I do !
Gary
 
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