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Discussion Starter #1
I've mentioned previously, the two incidents where the primers blew out and scattered bolt parts, extractor, spring and plunger, out thru the ejection port. Also mentioned I was going to put in a Kidd bolt, charging handle and spring, hoping to cure my problem.

The Kidd items are works of art! However, the Kidd bolt does not mate well with the Ruger receiver. The Kidd bolt has less radius on the aft corners which keeps it from mating properly with the Ruger receiver corners. It jams and twists, making it impossible to install the new Kidd charging assembly. I was finally able to squeeze the new bolt and the old charging assembly into the receiver. I'll find out tomorrow at the range how well it all works.

I will note the face of the Kidd bolt and the face of the aft end of the barrel form a nice head space. Hope it cures my problem.

If all goes well, I plan to take my dremel equipment and remove about 0.003" from the radius of the aft corners of Ruger receiver so I can use the Kidd charging assembly.

Or, m/b just go ahead and buy the Kidd receiver and barrel. Decisions, decisions.
 

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You could do it the way you mentioned, but I wouldn't. You are right about the back of the Kidd bolt being more square,because of that the bolt won't always go back far enough to drop under the rail just below the ejection port. What I would do (actually I have done it on two ruger receivers with Kidd bolts) is take a dremel or jeweler's file and remove a few thousandths from the back of that ledge. Once the bolt is installed with the bolt stop pin (bolt buffer) behind it the bolt has no chance of going to far back and falling of the ledge. Or you could take a belt sander and radius the back corners of the bolt, I was real close to doing that when I found a post about trimming the ledge.
 

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Tyendor is right. The guide ledge for the bolt is a little long and there's no harm in taking a few hundredths off it to provide clearance for dropping the bolt in. The bolt is hardened. You could grind the corners, but it's much easier to work on the aluminum receiver.

Also remember that if you drop the bolt in front-first, it will go in easier than if you try the other way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have already removed a small portion of the aft section of the rail; obviously, not enough. It would be less effort and likely better structurally, to work on the rail rather than the aft end of the receiver. I've never been able to install the bolt any way but front end first.

I suspect Kidd designed their bolt to fit their receiver, not the Ruger. Seem to recall Kidd had a qualifier on their page claiming their products were designed to Ruger specs and because of mfg. tolerances, both Kidd and Ruger tolerances, some fitting might be necessary.
 

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I doubt the problem is as bad as described in the original post. Inserting the bolt front-first enables the front to drop vertically all the way down without hanging up on the guide ledge. Inserting the bolt rear-first makes the bolt diagonal relative to the receiver, and the tallest part of the bolt is the front -hence it hangs up on the ledge. It's a little fiddly, but once you get it right it's like riding a bike.
 

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What we have here is a properly machined bolt, that may or may not fit in every factory receiver out there, because of production tolerances on the reciever
Come on now. Ruger hasn't ever had barrels crooked in the receiver or jacked up front sights. Its got to be the bolt.
 

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Dremel is always tricky. But a good Sheldon haircut incident with the Dremel is always a good reason to buy more Kidd parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, the range session went well. The rifle handled 90 rounds without a whimper. It made 0.75" groups of 10 rounds each, at 25 yards. Some of the groups started at 0.50", but when I exceeded five rounds, shots started to spread.

Back to RNGreenHat and the bolt installation. With the Kidd charging handle installed, the front of bolt will not fall far enough to engage the handle because the guide ledge catches the top front of the bolt keeping it from also dropping down into the rear of the receiver. I suspect the Kidd charging handle is also a bit larger than the Ruger one, because the Ruger one allowed enough room for the bolt to drop.

Anyway, I was happy with the head space before shooting; it looked great. Now that things work OK, I'm even more pleased. When I clean the rifle tomorrow, I'll give that guide ledge a little work and put in the Kidd charging handle.

The groups the rifle shoots are good enough for now. Need to improve me. So, no more aftermarket parts in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, the range session went well. The rifle handled 90 rounds without a whimper. It made 0.75" groups of 10 rounds each, at 25 yards. Some of the groups started at 0.50", but when I exceeded five rounds, shots started to spread.

Back to RNGreenHat and the bolt installation. With the Kidd charging handle installed, the front of bolt will not fall far enough to engage the handle because the guide ledge catches the top front of the bolt keeping it from also dropping down into the rear of the receiver. I suspect the Kidd charging handle is also a bit larger than the Ruger one, because the Ruger one allowed enough room for the bolt to drop.

Anyway, I was happy with the head space before shooting; it looked great. Now that things work OK, I'm even more pleased. When I clean the rifle tomorrow, I'll give that guide ledge a little work and put in the Kidd charging handle.

The groups the rifle shoots are good enough for now. Need to improve me. So, no more aftermarket parts in the near future.[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Somehow I double posted my last post. Sorry! I haven't gotten around to doing any more cutting in the receiver, so I'm still using the Ruger charging handle, etc.. Got busy with other projects. I've finished my Ruger Mark iii projects, sears, hammers, hammer bushings along with assorted springs. Still have to add an adjustable rear sight to my CZ TS and a straight trigger to my EAA Witness Limited, then back to the 10-22.

Got diverted when I took my Grandson to his first real firearms shooting session. He's 18, lives in Germany where he could only shoot air guns. I guess they progress to firearms after air gun training. Anyway, he has now experienced shooting .22lr and 5.56 rifles; and .22lr, 9mm and .45 ACP pistols.
 

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Are you dropping the bolt in front-first? Even a factory bolt may hang up (depends on manufacturing tolerances) if you allow the rear of the bolt to fall first. When you drop the bolt in, the charging handle is behind its slot. Press down lightly on the bolt while slowly easing the charging handle forward until it engages its slot, then the bolt will snap down into place.

The Kidd charging handle is exactly the same width as the OEM. Additionally, the Kidd bolt has chamfered edges that guide the bolt easily down onto the charging handle.

I suspect that your problem lies in your technique, not in your parts.

It doesn't hurt the rifle to file a few hundredths off the bolt guide rail if needed. But I suspect that people do it more often than necessary to make up for improper technique in installation.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
RNGreenhat, I'm pretty sure we've had this discussion before. By now, I must have removed and installed 10-22 bolts at least a 100 times. My technique is exactly as you describe. The KIDD equipment is nice, much better than stock Ruger.

The issue lies in the fact that there are specifications and there are manufacturing tolerances. They sometimes get out of sync. Especially when one, or more, companies get involved.

You are correct. A little work on that guide rail will take care of my immediate problem of not being able to mount both the new KIDD bolt and charging handle together in a Ruger receiver.

At one time KIDD noted their parts were based on published Ruger specs and may not fit exactly with Ruger parts because of manufacturing tolerances of both companies.
 

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Well, I'm not looking over your workbench as you do it. I've seen plenty of students in my 10/22 maintenance workshops have trouble with the bolt until they actually try my method.

I'm sure you will find a workable solution with your knowledge.
 
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