Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an assortment of revolvers, but I'd like to get something to put a red dot or scope on and try shooting 50 yards, standing. I'd like it to be a 357 (though I'd entertain other calibers is there is a compelling reason). For longer distance revolver shooting, help me nail down the following:

- barrel length?
- S/A or D/A (I'm assuming I'd get a D/A, though at these distances likely shoot it as a S/A)?
- and specific suggestions (I'm thinking between Ruger GP-100 with a trigger job, S&W performance center, or Dan Wesson, because of the longer barrel options)

Thanks.
 

·
Righteous Dude
Joined
·
21,694 Posts
The 686 Competitor always seemed like a sweet option. Easy to mount an optic and 6" of barrel. Plus, it's weighted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So I've done some research--which basically means internet opinions, which may or may not have value. Here's what I'v learned.

1) Longer barrels may suffer from a barrel resonance that may effect accuracy--therefore, long barrels may not be an advantage.

2) If using a scope, barrel length matters less (as long as it is long enough to stabilize the bullet).

3) Tensioned barrels (Dan Wessons, a few S&Ws) may have an accuracy advantage.

4) Triggers matter, but most revolvers can be worked to have reasonable target trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
6" GP100 with a Weig-a-Tinny no-gunsmith mount, then you can put ANY optic you want on it.

For PURE target shooting, in it's purest sense, I'd go with a 6.5" .357 Blackhawk and put a 17 lb. Wolff mainspring and a 40 oz. trigger return spring (takes 10 minutes and a good fitting screwdriver). It takes double action out of the equation, since you won't be shooting DA for slow fire, accuracy oriented target shooting.

"Match" shooting is a whole different idea all together, there are tons of "matches" you could use a DA revolver for, but I'm talking purely "target" shooting.

I have a 6.5" .357 Blackhawk with lighter springs and this thing will just shoot the pants off pretty much any other revolver out there, for pure accuracy. We're talking 25 yard cloverleafs from a rest. It is 100% just a range shooter, slow fire Bullseye type gun but as far as a "target" gun, it's the best I have. .38 Wadcutters through this, as long as you do your part, it will put them where you aim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,358 Posts
So I've done some research--which basically means internet opinions, which may or may not have value.
Well, if you can fish through the fanboy BS, and whining, there is also a lot of good information out there.

Few people can shoot well enough to detect barrel resonance effects. I'm pretty sure a full length underlug will calm it down either way. My 6"/GP 100 is as accurate off a bench bag as I've ever been able to shoot. It will make one hole groups with 3.5gr of Red Dot and a DEWC @ 25yds.

Scopes eliminate any need for a longer sight plane, but reducing mass and/or length effectively increases all sorts of shooter induced bias. I never held a revolver with a 2" barrel that shot better than a revolver with a 6" barrel.

Tensioned barrels are out there aside from Dan Weson's. Smith and Wesson two piece barrels, which many complain about, are some of the most accurate handguns I've ever had the chance to shoot, and owning one myself, I'm OK with them as accuracy goes.

Triggers, yeah.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
What are you trying to shoot at 50 yards? Paper? steel, critters?

50 yards is getting out there with a handgun, standing, unsupported. Very do-able but out there.

I agree that barrel length is less important with optics. The main advantage to longer barrels on revolvers is to get more distance between the sights. The slight increase in velocity with a longer barrel just isn't that big of a deal when shooting paper. I have long considered the 6" barrel to be a dedicated target or hunting revolver only. I can't see the advantage of anything longer than that with a scope. You could probably get by just fine with a 4" tube if scope mounting wasn't an issue.

If you're just shooting paper or steel with a handgun there's no need for big bores, super heavy magnum loads, giant guns and all of that other nonsense. If you need a rifle, GET ONE.

Some guns are more optic friendly right out of the box, that might play a big part of my decision.

We used to put a big rock at the bottom of the berm and get as far back as the range would allow, usually between 50 -75 yards. You could hit a rock the size of a 2 liter Pepsi bottle all day long with a fixed sighted 4" 38 Special once you got the range down. A .357 magnum will have a little advantage over a 38 Special in terms of bullet energy at impact and a slightly flatter trajectory but again, if you're just killing a steel plate, who cares?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
What are you trying to shoot at 50 yards? Paper? steel, critters?

A .357 magnum will have a little advantage over a 38 Special in terms of bullet energy at impact and a slightly flatter trajectory but again, if you're just killing a steel plate, who cares?
Shooting paper for the most part (not hunting). I reload so the different between 38 and 357 is very very minimal to me (it costs slightly more powder). And I'm not that recoil sensitive (at least when it comes to 357 out of heavier revolvers).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,977 Posts
Have used scoped and red dot equipped 6" GP100s and S&W 686s for 50 yard offhand shooting. As long as you have a decent trigger - and you can get either one with a very good trigger, out of the box by being a little selective - you'll be more than ready for that kind of work. The limiting factor for 50 yard offhand work is very much going to be your skill, not the fine points between the two that always get hashed out in the usual Ruger vs Smith debate.

For offhand work, I do prefer a barrel at least 5 inches in length, not because longer barrels are more accurate, but because some muzzle heaviness is desirable for the sake of steadiness, especially when using a scope. Some weight out front also tends to dampen some less than perfect trigger technique.

I prefer shooting Single Action revolvers for my offhand shooting, but that's offhand shooting with iron sights (and iron sights are very doable for 50 yard offhand work). If you want to use a scope or red dot, lots more in the way of scope mount options with a DA revolver.

All in all, what you use for offhand work is still as much personal preference as it is a matter of features. My advice is not to get trapped in all the "what is best" arguments and get out and try some different guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
64 Chevy, are you willing to spend serious money. I would say the most accurate revolver I am aware of is a Freedom Arms model 83 in 357 magnum with a 6 inch. With a good scope this revolver will be more accurate than the majority of the shooters out there. Of course this is a single action revolver. The experts claim the single action revolver is more accurate than a SA/DA revolver. Of course this is only theory.
Howard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,156 Posts
Been a S&W fan for years have more Rugers. But the theory of a S/A being more accurate then D/A do not know if I buy that! But to me if you are very selective and picky. Wanting to buy a new revolver I would opt for a Ruger GP100 6 inch barreled .357. Not really would want a 2 piece barrel if that's what S&W 686's have. I believe that the assembly can either be shoddy or very nice and that many problems can be avoided with a new revolver like I said if you are very selective. I looked at in the last few months some standard GP100's that were nicer actions and trigger pulls compared to a GP100 Match Champion. Now my last acquisition my Ruger GP100 Wiley Clapp I lucked out. Fit & finish out standing. ExArmy11b's suggestion on a revolver/scope mount is really the best of both this way you can do either open sights or a scope. Good Luck
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
For short range shooting under 50yrds, unless you're shooting from a rest and really trying to cut bugholes, a scope isn't necessary, or even really a benefit. Off-hand NRA Conventional Pistol shooting is done at 50yrds, typically with iron sights, and result in some of the best accuracy in any handgun precision competition out there.

Wanna stretch out with a revolver? Get your groups small at 50yrds, then reach out 5 times further. Then the optic and rest really become critical.

If you're seriously considering 50yrd precision target shooting, as much as I love Ruger revolvers, the best option for you to own does not say "Ruger" on the side.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Not really would want a 2 piece barrel if that's what S&W 686's have.
If you've never shot a tensioned barrel in competition, speculation isn't worth much. This design has proven itself to be one of, if not THE most accurate revolver barrel attachment design in the industry.

However, only the 686 "Competitor" out of their current catalog has a tensioned barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,329 Posts
How about a nice used Colt Python?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,156 Posts
Well coming from you I totally believe you. My problem is thinking of guns from the past when the 686 first come out I thought the first ones out wasn't a two piece barrel. Then the thought of a tensioned barrel makes me think about the old fine Dan Wesson D/A's Exactly what is a tensioned barrel?? I mentioned the GP100 because I like ExArmy11b's suggestion on the scope mount etc. Plus the thought that I just recently bought myself a Ruger GP100 such a nice revolver. But I really looked around before I found the right one for myself!!
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top