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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a guy wanting to sell an Interarms Mark X in 7mm (whether that is Rem Mag or Mauser I have no idea) and a Smith and Wesson 1500 in 300 Win Mag.
Neither look like they are perfect but the Smith looks quite a bit better than the Interarms. I'd like to know a rough value on both of them. And maybe a little more information on them. I know that Husqvarna made the Smith rifle and the Interarms is a Czech made Mauser type action. Are either of these very desireable? I'm waiting on more info from the guy still. Thanks ahead of time. (First pic is the Interarms and Second and Third pics are the Smith)





 

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I'd say the value of both on the used market it about $300.00 each!
 

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I recently bought an Interarms Mark X in 7mm x 57 (7mm Mauser)..with a base and rings and no scope..paid $400..in beautiful shape and got about 500 rounds of brass and a bunch of misc bullets and a couple of boxes of Federal loaded ammo.

The 7mm is a wonderful cartridge....old line and very desirable...

If the Mark X has Manchester England on the side of the receiver it was made in a fine plant in England and those may have a bit more value...I figured that with mine.

I don't know about the other one but on both I'd be very cautious to check the headspace with gauges (not scotch tape)...If the rifles have been shot a lot there may be issues and also both are calibers that get hot rodded a lot and many of either caliber can have some problems...I'd certainly have a smith put a go/no go gauge in them before I plunked down any money..they are not worth rebarreling.
 

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I thought Howa made the 1500. The Husqvarna guns had letter identifiers, Model A, etc.

From what I can tell, neither is bringing more than a few hundred these days. That doesn't surprise me about the MK X, but the Husqvarna is considered one of the best commercial Mausers. I'd take it in a heartbeat over the Interarms.
 

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+1 I think the old S&W rifles and shotguns are made by Howa of Japan, who makes or did make, at least, some high quality firearms.
 

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The S&W 1500 was made by Howa the bottom gun you have pictured is one of those.The mark X was made in England not saying they didn't make any Czech ones.At the max the guns are $300 each as ruff as they look in the pictures they have to be worse in the hand.One thing I don't like is someone giving false info on guns to make you think they are more valuable.Maybe an honest mistake maybe not
 

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The S&W 1500 was made by Howa the bottom gun you have pictured is one of those.The mark X was made in England not saying they didn't make any Czech ones.At the max the guns are $300 each as ruff as they look in the pictures they have to be worse in the hand.One thing I don't like is someone giving false info on guns to make you think they are more valuable.Maybe an honest mistake maybe not
The Interarms Mark X wasn't made in England or the Czech Republic.

It's the same basic thing as a Herter's J9; same basic thing as the Remington 798, being basically a commercial Mauser of Yugoslavian origin -"Crevna Zastava" and not "Ceska Zbrokva".

I had two of the upmarket Whitworth versions of the Interarms Mark X, but in spite of the very English-sounding name, and in spite of having "Alexandria, Virgina" and "Manchester, England" roll-marked on them, nothing on them was made in England or Virginia. The things had Yugoslav proof marks on the barrels and actions and the paperwork with them clearly identified them as being products of Crevna Zastava, made in Yugoslavia.

I also had a Herter's J9 and it was the same commercial Zastava Mauser my Whitworth Mark X's were, though the latter had much nicer stocks and express sights.

I've seen scores of Interarms Mark X Mausers and have yet to see a single one stamped "Made in England" anywhere on it.
 

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If the Mark X has Manchester England on the side of the receiver it was made in a fine plant in England and those may have a bit more value...I figured that with mine.
Not necessarily so.

I owned two of the Whitworth versions of the Mark X and that's all they were -upmarket versions with nicer walnut stocks and express sights. They were marked "Manchester, England" on them, but carried Yugoslav proof marks on the barrel and action and weren't stamped "Made in England," anywhere. All of the paperwork in their boxes suggested that they were the Crevna Zastava Mausers that they were.

This "fine plant in England" was a warehouse in Manchester, England. Stuff was stored there, not made there.

Interams was founded in 1953 by an American by the name of Samuel Cummings. He had warehouses in Alexandria, Virginia and Manchester, England, and was heavily involved in international arms trade -hence the name "Interarms." For the U.S. market, he was primarily involved in procuring surplus WWII arms in the 1950s and 1960s. Cummings' arms import business was significantly impacted after surplus military firearm imports were greatly restricted by the US Gun Control Act of 1968. Importation of foreign commercial arms sustained the business after 1968. One of those was the Crevna Zastava Mauser.

Cummings had warehouses in lots of countries, but he had a fairly big one in Manchester, England, which was featured in a BBC documentary back in 1990 or 1991, and he kept the company HQ at Alexandria, Virginia, even after he became a British subject. He was living in Monte Carlo, Monaco when he died.

There was no "fine plant in England" where Mark X mausers were made. They were made by Zastava in Yugoslavia. All of them. Even the up-market "Whitworth" branded versions like I had. Mine did have Brimingham proof marks in addition to Yugoslav proof marks on it, but every gun sold in the UK or exported from there (whether made there or not) has to pass British proof.

My Parker-Hale shotgun, actually made by Ugartechea in Eibar, Spain, had Birmingham proof marks on it, too, but was most definitely made in Spain as roll-marked on the barrel. Parker-Hale imported them from Spain to England; Precision Sports of Cortland, N.Y. imported them from England to the U.S.

That's kind of what Cummings did with Mark X rifles. They'd get made in Yugoslavia and transported first to the U.K., where they would be warehoused in Manchester. Some of those would end up at the Birmingham proof house, and then return back to the warehouse in Manchester. They would go from there to wherever, including the U.S.A. But the only thing "Made in England" on the things was the stamping indicating they passed British proof so they could be sold in the U.K. and exported out of it.
 
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