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Discussion Starter #1
My SR9 is used primarily for target shooting, so it doesn't need to be "cocked and locked". Wondering on what is the best way to store it for extended periods. Whenever you rack it, the striker goes into a "preloaded" state, there is some tension on the spring. Only way I know to relieve the tension is by pulling the trigger. But, it is also recommended NOT to dry fire without a magazine in place (gun is not modified). Is there a way to relieve the tension in the spring without dry firing?
 

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I dry fire everything that I own and don't worry one bit about springs on mags or actions. A gun is a machine and machine sometimes break. When they break, you repair them.

In over 50 years of dry firing guns........tens of thousands of times, here's the total damage toll:

Peened end on a Colt 1911 firing pin. Used a stone to remove the "damage" and it's ticking right along.

Broken firing pin on a CZ 9mm pistol. Replaced it for about $18. No further problems. It was possibly defective as no other issues have developed.

Battered slide release on an AR-15 from extensive dry firing. Replaced it for about $15 and have had no further problems. I probably could have cleaned it up but it's easier just to replace it.

Never had a magazine that was damaged by leaving it loaded. In fact, the mags that were not 100% functional got that way from being dropped.

Striker fired particularly Glocks and S&W Sigma's dry fired thousands of times. No damage to any of them resulted.

Enjoy your gun and don't worry about it. They are pretty tough machines. If some damage occurs, the repair is easy and inexpensive.

Flash
 

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I leave my striker fired guns stored in the half cocked position. I did some reading about this when I first got my guns and the consensus was that the springs would not weaken from being under tension. They would only weaken by racking the slide or firing the gun. If you are concerned about wearing out the springs, you could always rack the slide, insert the magazine, pull the trigger and store.

Roger, there is a magazine disconnect safety on the SR series pistols. If there isn't a magazine in the gun, dry firing the gun will result in the firing pin smashing into a piece of metal protecting the gun from accidental discharge. In the case of the SR series guns, dry firing is perfectly fine as long as you keep a magazine in.
 

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All of my handguns are carried or stored fully loaded in condition one.
 

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I store mine uncocked. But as most say it doesn't really matter. Wear and tear result in use not storage.
 

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This question will again open up a can of worms so let's all go fishing. To each their own but most "Guru's" and real experts say to release all spring tension for short or long term storage and I agree.
 

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My striker fired firearms are stored either loaded, cocked, and ready or unloaded and not cocked. To release the spring and decock your Ruger, insert an empty magazine, rack the slide, point gun in safe direction, and pull the trigger. Remove the magazine if you choose. I seriously doubt that storing your Ruger in a cocked condition would do any damage to the pistol.
 

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dry fire/storage

I dry fire everything that I own and don't worry one bit about springs on mags or actions. A gun is a machine and machine sometimes break. When they break, you repair them.

In over 50 years of dry firing guns........tens of thousands of times, here's the total damage toll:

Peened end on a Colt 1911 firing pin. Used a stone to remove the "damage" and it's ticking right along.

Broken firing pin on a CZ 9mm pistol. Replaced it for about $18. No further problems. It was possibly defective as no other issues have developed.

Battered slide release on an AR-15 from extensive dry firing. Replaced it for about $15 and have had no further problems. I probably could have cleaned it up but it's easier just to replace it.

Never had a magazine that was damaged by leaving it loaded. In fact, the mags that were not 100% functional got that way from being dropped.

Striker fired particularly Glocks and S&W Sigma's dry fired thousands of times. No damage to any of them resulted.

Enjoy your gun and don't worry about it. They are pretty tough machines. If some damage occurs, the repair is easy and inexpensive.

Flash
I agree, and have been following the same regimine for at least as long as Roger:)
 

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This question will again open up a can of worms so let's all go fishing. To each their own but most "Guru's" and real experts say to release all spring tension for short or long term storage and I agree.
Forget the can of worms and open the box of truth. This is from the experts:

Magazine spring madness: 'creep' to your 'elastic limit' to un-earth the urban legend of 'spring-set'
by John S. Layman


The shooting sports are full of some of the most knowledgeable and capable people you'll meet anywhere. I've been impressed consistently with the abilities of those I meet at the range to diagnose and fix a gun problem with as little as some spray lube and a cotton swab. However, sometimes a myth will creep into the folklore.
The magazine spring myth has been around for many years and is growing in popularity. It goes something like this: "You should unload your magazines when they're not in use or the spring will weaken causing failures to feed." This has gone as far as shooting competitors actually unloading their magazines between stages to extend the life of their springs. A variant of this myth is: "You should never load a magazine to capacity and should always leave it one round short." What if you need that round some day?
Recently, I read an article in a gun magazine suggesting you rotate your magazines so the ones not in use can "recover and rest." The same author uses the phrase "spring-set" to describe weakness of a spring because it was compressed for a long time. Hogwash. There's nothing further from the truth. Springs don't care how long they're compressed and don't require rest, recreation or even a vacation from time to time.
Shameful Spring Benders
To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.
Now that the light of truth is leaking out, lets talk about what is causing failures to feed. The only way to weaken a magazine spring is to flex it past its normal range (elastic limit). If this is happening, somebody is trying to overload a magazine or has "adjusted" it by bending the spring. Both of these could cause feed failures. Shame on you if you're a spring bender.
Carlton Nether, Customer Service for Beretta USA, tells us keeping a pistol magazine loaded for an extended period doesn't cause magazine spring failure, however, failures to feed can result. He says, "The ammo will 'roll' in the magazine. If the mags are kept loaded and moved around a lot -- say on a cop's belt -- the rolling action can, over time, cause creases in the cases. These creases can cause malfunctions. Also the top bullet will roll against the magazine lips and creasing can occur there as well. Just check old ammo that's been bouncing around in a magazine for a long time.
We tell police officers if they keep loaded magazines, take a few seconds to "cycle" the ammo. Periodically unload the mag and reload it in a different sequence. This movement will allow the bullets to be in different parts of the magazine and help eliminate creasing.
At STI, Dave Skinner, President and CEO says, "Personally, I rotate my 'under the bed' and 'under the seat' mags about every six months. I always empty them the 'fun' way and have never had a failure." Given what we
learned above, this sounds like a good idea. Smith and Wesson customer service also says magazines can stay loaded indefinitely without hurting the spring.
As we add force onto a spring, it will displace the same amount for each amount of force we add. This is true until the spring passes a certain point called the elastic limit. Robert Hooke discovered this theory back in 1660. Hooke's Law states: "If the applied forces on a body are not too large, the deformations resulting are directly proportional to the forces producing them." Which means, in actual human being language, if we load a spring past its elastic limit, it permanently deforms. It still provides a force against the load but the force is no longer proportional. If this happens, when we unload the spring (such as when we empty a magazine that has been over-loaded) the spring never returns to a state where it can provide the same load for the same amount of displacement.
Trust Us
When a magazine manufacturer designs a spring, they plan for a preload. The spring is already compressed some in the magazine. On the curve below, this would be Point A. The spring compression would be designed to be below the Elastic Limit. When fully compressed, the spring would be at Point B. If the spring is ever compressed past the elastic limit, say to Point C, it won't ever behave the same. Like a recalcitrant lazy Uncle, it will have a lower spring force for each amount of displacement. On the drawing, the spring would now cycle between points D and E. This means that -- particularly with the last bullet or two -- the force pushing the bullet up would be less and lo-and-behold, a mis-feed might occur.
When somebody stretches your spring to "fix" your magazine, they are trying to get you back on the original curve. They may get pretty close, however, it's unlikely the spring will ever perform to its original design. The elastic limit is now shifted lower and your magazine spring may fail to perform fairly quickly.
Having said all this, if you have a magazine that isn't feeding right, what should you do? First, disassemble the magazine and clean it thoroughly. Then try it with new, factory ammunition in a freshly cleaned gun. This takes away some of the possible causes. If you are still having feed problems, send it back. Even the low cost, after-market magazine manufacturers will fix the problem at no cost to you other than shipping. If it's a magazine from the gun's manufacturer, let them troubleshoot and repair the problem. Otherwise, toss the mag. It's not worth risking your life to save a few bucks. And that's the truth.
RELATED ARTICLE: Definitions
Creep: The flow or plastic deformation of metals held for long periods of time at stresses lower than the normal yield strength.
Elastic Limit: The maximum stress that material will stand before permanent deformation occurs.
Yield Strength: The stress at which the metal changes from elastic to plastic in behavior, i.e., takes a permanent set.
Permanent Set: Non-elastic or plastic, deformation of metal under stress, after passing the elastic limit.
Magazine Recommendations
* Clean your magazines when they get gritty. Apply oil then remove all excess. Oil attracts dirt that may cause malfunction.
* If you find rust on the spring, this is culprit. Rust changes the thickness of the metal and reduces the force applied to the follower. Cleaning off the rust may help. For a gun you depend on, replace the spring. All the major brands and most of the smaller ones have replacement mag springs available or try Wolff Springs.
* If you keep a magazine loaded for long periods, rotate the rounds every few months. If you carry a pistol on the job or in your car, cycle the ammo frequently. These actions prevent creases from forming which may cause a misfeed.
* If you experience feed problems, first clean your magazines and weapon. Fire a couple magazines of new factory ammo to see if this resolves the problem. If not send the magazine back to the manufacturer -- or toss it.
 

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Forget the can of worms and open the box of truth. This is from the experts:[/FONT]
When I say Guru's and experts I should have said Ayoob, American Rifleman magazine and the Arizona Sherrif on the Best Defense to mention a few. These people aren't scientists or metalurgists. They are gun people with allot of experience and that's good enough for me. To each his own and remember, opinions are like elbows, most people have two.
 

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When I say Guru's and experts I should have said Ayoob, American Rifleman magazine and the Arizona Sherrif on the Best Defense to mention a few. These people aren't scientists or metalurgists. They are gun people with allot of experience and that's good enough for me. To each his own and remember, opinions are like elbows, most people have two.

Their opinions do no matter when science and metallurgy debunks the spring myths.
 

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In order to have absolutely no tension on a spring, all fireams should be completely disasssembled after each use and prior to the next use.

That means all springs, including those in each and every magazine.

Don't forget that there are springs in the hammer/striker, under adjustable sights, trigger safeties, slide release, mag releases, etc. (there are at least 15 springs in a SR9c.)

It's hypocritical to be worried only about a few springs and ignore all the rest.

While you are at it, each night after parking your vehicle, disassemble it so the springs don't get weak.

How people can still believe that springs get weakened by anything other than the movement of the spring rather then either being compressed or relaxed is incredible.

There are too many people who professionally deal with the physics and metallury of springs who say it's not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I know it's off topic but I gotta ask, does NCBBA stand for North Carolina Beach Buggy Association?
Yes it does! Love it down there (Hatteras Island). Only go once a year, but I pay my membership to help in the fight to keep beach access open. It's been a real battle lately.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
mndoggie,
You are the type of person that makes those less knowledgable than yourself hesitant to ask questions. I thought that was the idea behind this forum. This is my first semi-auto, although I have been shooting for 20+ years. I am still learning about my SR9. The manuals don't cover everything, and I haven't seen any youtube videos addressing this issue. I did my research, and fell short. That's why I asked here. I thought maybe there was some way to de-cock a stricker fire without pulling the trigger. And while I didn't ask about magazine springs, I appreciate the effort Storm 40 went through. I must have picked the wrong forum to join. Even thought I just got here, it may be time to move on . . .
 

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mndoggie,
You are the type of person that makes those less knowledgable than yourself hesitant to ask questions. I thought that was the idea behind this forum. This is my first semi-auto, although I have been shooting for 20+ years. I am still learning about my SR9. The manuals don't cover everything, and I haven't seen any youtube videos addressing this issue. I did my research, and fell short. That's why I asked here. I thought maybe there was some way to de-cock a stricker fire without pulling the trigger. And while I didn't ask about magazine springs, I appreciate the effort Storm 40 went through. I must have picked the wrong forum to join. Even thought I just got here, it may be time to move on . . .
Sorry you feel that way. I wasn't directing my answer at you.

My answers were/are directed at those who keep the spring weakening myth going on. If you search any firearm forum you hear that "mag springs go bad when fully loaded and left that way for long periods of time." Yet those same people don't bother to make sure then, that all the other springs are relaxed.

If one spring requires relaxation, they all should.

Storm provided information that has been seen here by others in the past. I know search engines don't always pick up needed information. Virtually all the responses to your post said springs under tension aren't a problem.

To say otherwise just confuses those who are new to firearms.
 

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In order to have absolutely no tension on a spring, all fireams should be completely disasssembled after each use and prior to the next use.

That means all springs, including those in each and every magazine.

Don't forget that there are springs in the hammer/striker, under adjustable sights, trigger safeties, slide release, mag releases, etc. (there are at least 15 springs in a SR9c.)

It's hypocritical to be worried only about a few springs and ignore all the rest.

While you are at it, each night after parking your vehicle, disassemble it so the springs don't get weak.

How people can still believe that springs get weakened by anything other than the movement of the spring rather then either being compressed or relaxed is incredible.

There are too many people who professionally deal with the physics and metallury of springs who say it's not a problem.
I thought the answer was fine, short, true, and to the point, No nose wiping,
no apologies, ( not politically correct enough for some ? ) some folks get tired of playing nanny to some folks, how many times do you need to hear something ?
I see post with 50 answers about 50 opinions
Most times it's correct or it's wrong, this is a internet forum, you get all kinds of answers to all kinds of questions, what makes you think half the people know what they are talking about ? These are guns we are using, not Dominoes.
mndoggie,
You are the type of person that makes those less knowledgable than yourself hesitant to ask questions. I thought that was the idea behind this forum. This is my first semi-auto, although I have been shooting for 20+ years. I am still learning about my SR9. The manuals don't cover everything, and I haven't seen any youtube videos addressing this issue. I did my research, and fell short. That's why I asked here. I thought maybe there was some way to de-cock a stricker fire without pulling the trigger. And while I didn't ask about magazine springs, I appreciate the effort Storm 40 went through. I must have picked the wrong forum to join. Even thought I just got here, it may be time to move on . . .
Why don't you just listen and take the advise, or better yet call the manufacturer and get the straight poop. Then come back and find out the people you thought got you all miffed up were correct and perhaps just a little tired of a simple question taking 50 answers to get the point across.
 

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I know it's off topic but I gotta ask, does NCBBA stand for North Carolina Beach Buggy Association?
It does for me. :)

NCBBA member 13023.
 

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And while I didn't ask about magazine springs, I appreciate the effort Storm 40 went through. I must have picked the wrong forum to join. Even thought I just got here, it may be time to move on . . .
My post is relevant to all springs even though its focus is on magazine springs. I am sorry if our attempt to give you any informed advise has been a source of consternation.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Sorry you feel that way. I wasn't directing my answer at you.

My answers were/are directed at those who keep the spring weakening myth going on.

To say otherwise just confuses those who are new to firearms.
My apologies. Thin skinned at the moment, just lost my dog of 12 years...
 
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