Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states, has anyone weighted the stocks on the Ruger Americans in larger bores? The .308 and the 450 Bushmaster I have really pound my shoulder after 10 rounds or so, and I think adding weight to the butt stock would help.

I was thinking of adding steel bb's or lead shot in a bag of some sort shoved in the cavities of the buttstock to add weight. I know if I pour loose bb's in there it will rattle unless they're packed in tightly, but I don't hunt yet so noise really doesn't matter to me.

I have watched a few videos online and some guys melt lead into a shape and slide pieces in the voids in the butt stock, I am not opposed to that, but I really don't want to melt the lead... I don't have an outdoor burner and pot I can use right now, but I know I could get one... Just trying to do it easily and cheap to prove my theory.

Or would it be better to get a Magpul stock? or just put a limb saver on? I have a limb saver, and I use it on my Mosin's and other steel butt plate guns, but haven't tried it on the Americans.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,342 Posts
Are you shooting primarily from a bench? That makes big difference on felt recoil. There's no way for your body to roll with it.

Buy a new stock. One of the main reasons I prefer the Hawkeyes over the Americans is the cheap plastic stocks most of the American line has. They're garbage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you shooting primarily from a bench? That makes big difference on felt recoil. There's no way for your body to roll with it.

Buy a new stock. One of the main reasons I prefer the Hawkeyes over the Americans is the cheap plastic stocks most of the American line has. They're garbage.
Yes, primarily from a bench, and I know it definitely feels better off-hand shooting, but I am no where near as steady standing... I don;t mind the American stocks, the .308 has the black plastic one, so I may look for a Magpul for it or even a laminated stock, but the 450 Bushmaster is the Ranch version in the tan stock, and I like that stock so I am keeping it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
OP, with cowboy shotguns, remove the butt pad and make a dead mule from a baggie of lead shot.
The Stoeger Supreme has a large enough bolt hole to accept about a pound of shot.
This is a non-permanent addition, and easily removed.
It does bias the weight balance farther back toward the butt stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OP, with cowboy shotguns, remove the butt pad and make a dead mule from a baggie of lead shot.
The Stoeger Supreme has a large enough bolt hole to accept about a pound of shot.
This is a non-permanent addition, and easily removed.
It does bias the weight balance farther back toward the butt stock.
Pardon my ignorance, but is a dead mule loose shot in a bag that fits inside the stock and "floats" like a dead blow hammer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
Fighting recoil on large bore rifles has a long and convoluted history .
I started looking into it , at age 15 , after firing my first 45-70 with a 500 grain bullet , the rifle had a steel butt plate ... I only shot it once .
Weight helps but remember you have to carry that weight ... if weight is no object , F-Class Benchrest rifles can weigh 22 pounds ... lets assume that's not practical ... add some weightand the best thing I've found is a properly dimensioned stock ...it has to fit you ... and a good recoil pad .
If a heavy recoiler doesn't fit ...you take a hit to the face , which seems like much more recoil than it is . Decent weight , good recoil pad and perfectly fitting stock .
Learning how to "roll with the punch" is also important ... lets call this proper shooting technique ...very important also . Standing there and trying to absorb the recoil can also beat you up ...roll with it .
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
Pardon my ignorance, but is a dead mule loose shot in a bag that fits inside the stock and "floats" like a dead blow hammer?
It doesn't float ... it just lies there like a "dead mule" ...fill the baggie / hole with as much shot as possible ...the floating "dead blow" hammer effect would add to the recoil ...avoid them floating mules .
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It doesn't float ... it just lies there like a "dead mule" ...fill the baggie / hole with as much shot as possible ...the floating "dead blow" hammer effect would add to the recoil ...avoid them floating mules .
Gary
Thanks for the clarity :) The dead mule approach was what I originally intended to try. Also, I don;t need to carry the rifle in the woods, so I don't care if it weighs 5 lbs more
 
  • Like
Reactions: gwpercle

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,703 Posts
I’d go with a new stock........
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sr40ken

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
I am one that is in the new stock camp. It’s not just the weight but the rigidity. Most of those molded plastic stock has rigidity issues. There might be a bedding block to support the receiver, but the forearm can usually be flexed to touch the barrel, particularly if the rifle is rested farther out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am one that is in the new stock camp. It’s not just the weight but the rigidity. Most of those molded plastic stock has rigidity issues. There might be a bedding block to support the receiver, but the forearm can usually be flexed to touch the barrel, particularly if the rifle is rested farther out.
I'm not concerned so much with the rigidity right now, my accuracy is fine for me, I may try the dead mule thing, and see what it gains me if anything, if now I may go with a Magpul on this one- I love the way they look more and more. Have the Backpacker on my 10/22 takedown and it's awesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Those stocks have pockets molded into the forearm that can be filled with lead shot and some shooters use silicone sealant to glue the shot in place. Pour in some shot, squeeze in enough silicone to cover and hold it. The shot could be dug out later if needed.
Putting some shot in the forearm can help balance what you put in the buttstock.
155912


I like Magpul products but for $300 I'd look into a wood stock.

I got a custom Boyd's made for my M77 about three years ago and it is one of my favorite stocks of all my guns. Cost a little over $200 (checkering was about $60 additional) but I love the look and feel and accuracy. To me real wood is worth a lot.
155913


You can add a wood stock to your American model and end up with a rifle almost as good as a Hawkeye for less money. Don't get me wrong, I love my three M77s and they are worth what they cost but the RARs are also good rifles and cost less. I'd rather drag a RAR through the brush than ding up one of my M77s, mine are for varmints and targets from the bench.
 

·
Corps Commander NGV
Joined
·
6,108 Posts
My T/C Compass came with a flimsy lightweight stock. Recoil wasn't an issue with a .243, but I wanted to improve balance and stiffen the stock up. I filled the voids in the forearm with epoxy after roughing up the plastic for better adhesion. You can mix small birdshot into the epoxy for adding weight or set fishing weights in the holes and epoxy over them. Make up a shot bag for the hollow butt but that balances the rifle to your satisfaction, then fill the empty space with expanding foam insulation or upholstery foam. It worked great for me. I eventually decided I wanted my rifle to look as good as it shot and put a Boyds stock on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I bought a 2 pound lead block from Midway. I'm pretty sure it's for melting and molding bullets. I epoxied it in place in the rear of the stock on my Savage in 375 Ruger to add some weight to it. It was so light it was absolutely brutal to shoot. Another thing from shooting from the bench is wear a good past recoil pad and get more upright. I built a wooden riser, for lack of better terms, to put my sand bag or rest on top of and use a taller rear back with some blocks under it for extra height if needed. It gets me more upright and can rock back with the recoil better than hunkered down over the bench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I don’t consider a 308 a big bore but my American in 30-06 shooting 180 grain bullets with a stock that is too short for me was wearing on my nose. I added a slip on Sims vibration lab recoil pad to add length and it really helped tame the recoil. I hate the black stocks so I had it dipped in a burlwood pattern to make it at least palatable. The rifle is worth the trouble though as it is the most accurate rifle I have ever shot and that is including the 03A3’s I shot on the rifle service team in Germany.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Should have added that my MS 1905 is just as light and being a 9x56 is shooting 250 grain bullets but due to the stock configuration it is a pleasure to shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Those stocks have pockets molded into the forearm that can be filled with lead shot and some shooters use silicone sealant to glue the shot in place. Pour in some shot, squeeze in enough silicone to cover and hold it. The shot could be dug out later if needed.
Putting some shot in the forearm can help balance what you put in the buttstock.
View attachment 155912

I like Magpul products but for $300 I'd look into a wood stock.

I got a custom Boyd's made for my M77 about three years ago and it is one of my favorite stocks of all my guns. Cost a little over $200 (checkering was about $60 additional) but I love the look and feel and accuracy. To me real wood is worth a lot.
View attachment 155913

You can add a wood stock to your American model and end up with a rifle almost as good as a Hawkeye for less money. Don't get me wrong, I love my three M77s and they are worth what they cost but the RARs are also good rifles and cost less. I'd rather drag a RAR through the brush than ding up one of my M77s, mine are for varmints and targets from the bench.
That’s feedback I was hoping for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don’t consider a 308 a big bore but my American in 30-06 shooting 180 grain bullets with a stock that is too short for me was wearing on my nose. I added a slip on Sims vibration lab recoil pad to add length and it really helped tame the recoil. I hate the black stocks so I had it dipped in a burlwood pattern to make it at least palatable. The rifle is worth the trouble though as it is the most accurate rifle I have ever shot and that is including the 03A3’s I shot on the rifle service team in Germany.
Well, I know .308 isn’t big bore, but in a light rifle, it’s like a shooting a plastic stocked 12 gauge to me. Last time I shot a plastic stock mossy 500, I bruised my cheek, my shoulder, and missed most of my shot by the end of the day because I was cringing every time I shoot!

I traded it to a buddy not long after.

I don’t need to be macho and say recoil doesn’t bother me, I wanna be accurate and have fun.
I’m gonna try either lead shot or bb’s and stiffen the front of the stock with epoxy and shot.

i would like a laminated stock or magpul eventually.

Buffalo outdoors reviewed an American, wasn’t impressed, then put a magpul stock on it, and he said it was a new rifle!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Steel BBs weigh almost nothing and they're so big there is a lot of space between them. #9 shot is best if you can find and afford it.

When I was competing in trap and skeet (and practicing with a few hundred 12ga rounds a week) recoil was nothing to me. But a few years after I quit that I bought an M77RSI (international, fairly light) in .308 and the first box of ammo was 220gr bullets and it stung, I was surprised! Not terrible but enough that you had to respect it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Steel BBs weigh almost nothing and they're so big there is a lot of space between them. #9 shot is best if you can find and afford it.

When I was competing in trap and skeet (and practicing with a few hundred 12ga rounds a week) recoil was nothing to me. But a few years after I quit that I bought an M77RSI (international, fairly light) in .308 and the first box of ammo was 220gr bullets and it stung, I was surprised! Not terrible but enough that you had to respect it.
I also shoot an RSI in 250-3000. Nice rifles. The 99 probably has a pound and a half on the RSI so not quite so bad. I used to load 200 grain bullets in my 308 shooting out of a Savage 99 and they got your attention but were pure poison on wild hogs. I don’t think I would enjoy shooting the 220’s.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top