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You can't. It's just part of the operation of a revolver. Maybe there's some surface treatment that can be appiled but I'm not aware of it.

Maybe some of the "smithies" on the forum know of something.
 

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Only way to avoid the ring is to leave the revolver in the box and never touch it. It's part of the normal operation of the revolver.
 

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Never hurts to rotate the cylinder in place by hand before you cock the gun or close the loading gate on a single action. Won't prevent it, but will reduce it.
 

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Another trick: rather than rotating a misaligned cylinder into place, cock the hammer, & then release it slowly by holding the hammer, pulling the trigger just enough to release the hammer, letting go of the trigger completely, & then slowly lowering the hammer. Obviously, you'll want to be very careful when doing this w/ a loaded cylinder ... & again, it won't completely prevent the "ring", just reduce its prominence.
 

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As mentioned- don't shoot it if you can't tolerate the sight of a turn ring.
It's a mechanical device, like any other the only way to keep it looking new is to never use it.
Denis
 

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Never hurts to rotate the cylinder in place by hand before you cock the gun
or close the loading gate on a single action. Won't prevent it, but will reduce it.
This ^^^^
 

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I LIKE seeing a revolver with a solid 'turn ring' on it!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Another trick: rather than rotating a misaligned cylinder into place, cock the hammer, & then release it slowly by holding the hammer, pulling the trigger just enough to release the hammer, letting go of the trigger completely, & then slowly lowering the hammer. Obviously, you'll want to be very careful when doing this w/ a loaded cylinder ... & again, it won't completely prevent the "ring", just reduce its prominence.
I guess I should have said minimizing the ring. So advancing the cylinder using the hammer lowers the (pawl?) in the bottom of the frame, which is the part that scrapes on the cylinder right? And don't "free wheel" the cylinder while its in the frame?
 

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A gunsmith can time the revolver so that the bolt drops dead into the notch. That part dropping early is what causes the ring, and it can be fixed.
 

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I guess I should have said minimizing the ring. So advancing the cylinder using the hammer lowers the (pawl?) in the bottom of the frame, which is the part that scrapes on the cylinder right? And don't "free wheel" the cylinder while its in the frame?
Ruger refers to it as a "cylinder latch", but yes. It will still contact the cylinder somewhat before the notch, but not as much.
 

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Or buy a pre-MKIII Colt DA revolver that is timed properly. The cylinder latch(Colt calls it a "bolt") doesn't rise back up to the cylinder until it's in the lead in of the notch. Most other revolvers are designed to lower the latch only long enough to allow the cylinder to start it's rotation.then they pop right back up. Hence the turn ring.
(Yes,I know this is a Ruger forum,put up the torched and pitchforks!:D)
 

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It's pointless to worry about it, if you actually use the gun. It's like asking how to avoid burn rings on the cylinder face.

I have heard of some outrageous ways people avoid them, like taping the cylinder between the stop notches, using oil on the cylinder after each loading........all of it seems like a wasted effort to prevent a non-issue in the first place.

Also, anyone who has bought a brand new S&W knows that they come with a turn ring from the factory, and my NIB Alaskan came with a turn line from the test fire rounds at the factory. Don't stress about it, just shoot the gun and enjoy it:)
 

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My black hawk hunter has over 3000 rounds through it and if it has a turn ring it's darn hard to see. I just take a little care loading it and don't cowboy up and free spin the cylinder.
I open the gate and load it, then rotate the cylinder until resistance is felt, close the gate and it's locked up tite. NO turn ring, on a SS gun you can take a small piece of Scotch
bright pad and polish any marks off ( don't over do it )
 
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