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I want to build a custom 10/22, which I don't have as yet. Should I buy a basic wood stocked carbine and go from there? I looked at the 10/22 FS, which I liked a lot but wondered if I wouldn't do better with a custom barrel.

Also, what's the best source of 10/22 accessories. I don't know squat about anything at this point. My son has a basic one that is a blast to shoot.
 

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Depending on what you're going to end up with will determine which rifle you should start with. I knew I wanted a blued receiver and that I was going to change the stock and barrel so I went with the cheapest possible carbine. But if you think you might want a silver receiver, then you need to find one of the 10/22's in stainless.

If you want a heavy bull barrel, you might want to start with a target model as a heavy bull barrel will run you $100+. Ruger's heavy bull barrels on the target model are very nice barrels for the money.
 

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I bought the basic 10/22 & am upgrading as I see fit. Volquartsen Custom makes & sells a ton of parts for the rifle. Shop around online for deals, I got most of mine through MidwayUSA.

Volquartsen Custom 10/22 Parts/Accessories
 

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I built a target 10/22. also have no gun smith back ground. I bought everything needed from MidwayUSA.com everything bolts on.
 

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midwayusa.com
brownells.com
cabelas.com
1022racerifle.com
rimfiresports.com
Volquartsen.com
Ebay.com
 

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There are many ways to approach a 10/22 project. You can buy a stock one and build up from there or you can start from scratch...buying piece by piece. Also depends on what you are going to do with it.....from just having plain fun to competition shooting.
You can spend anywhere from $250 for a basic model to over $1k for a competition model. There are names out there like Volquartsen and Kidd which have tons of parts for stock 10/22 or complete competition grade rifles. I myself started with stock All-Weather 10/22 Stainless but now ended up with only the receiver and trigger frame being Ruger. If you are budget minded get a stock 10/22 and build up. Start off with a bolt buffer, auto bolt release, and then look into some trigger kits. You will notice just from my first 3 suggestions you will be more comfortable with your rifle and the trigger kits will DEFINITELY improve your accuracy.
 

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Look thru this thread...it has a wide variety of 10/22 to look at...

http://rugerforum.net/ruger-10-22-rimfire/39316-picture-thread-show-off-your-build.html

IMO...get the cheapest one you can find and then modify it as you go...figure out what style appeals to you and what kind of shooting you will do...

If you want to shoot primarily from a rest and want the best accuracy and most range you should get a 20" bull barrel with match chamber...

If you shoot more off hand than from a rest lighter is better...for that consider getting a thumbhole stock and aluminum barrel...

You can get a stock for a bull barrel and use your factory tapered barrel while deciding what barrel to get if you want to...

It will help if you know ahead of time what you want to do for scope and/or iron sights...
 

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• Decide what aspects are most important for you, performance, looks, etc.

• Decide on a budget. Keep in mind the spending more doesn't guarantee better results in any aspect.

• Start looking around and see what's available, what things cost, what gets good reviews, bad reviews, more use, less use, etc. Keep in mind the bigger brands are not always the best route to take. Can easily be more fashionable (brand name) than performance you're paying for.

• Decide what to go with and where to buy the items.

• Assemble and shoot




Basically, work backwards from what the end result should be to what you have now. I'd also suggest to try and keep things at an equal level. Often see folks that'll want the creme de la creme for part A then skimp on part B. Makes no sense. Also consider this with the optics and ammo as well. All the fancied up parts certainly won't benefit from cheap optics and that match barrel will never see it's full potential with the cheap bulk ammo. Figure this into the budget part of the equation.
 
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