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I just got my SP 101 2.25" and went to the ranger For first time. It was my first handgun firing, too. After around 100 shots, I found that most of my shots were
at the below-right of the targeted area. Guess that it was about the trigger pull.

Does anyone has tips to practicing or mastering this before going to the range? The bullets here are very expensive. One box of simple 148 grain.38 special lead wadcutter costs me around US$23
 

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People with more experience will chime in, but what helps me is a slow steady slow squeeze. Not a pull. The shot should startle you every time so you don't anticipate the shot.
 

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If your strong hand is your right hand shooting low right usually indicates that you are tightening your grip while squeezing the trigger.

Best way to overcome that is to dry fire, paying attention to what you are doing with your fingers. Get a firm two handed grip and consciously squeeze just the trigger.

The tightening may be an involuntary reaction to the anticipation of the recoil. Unfortunately the best way to overcome recoil shyness is to shoot, and shoot some more.

 

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One of the great benefits to having a laser mounted on a handgun is the ability to dry fire/practice trigger pull and see what needs correcting. Doesn't take many boxes of ammo to equal the price of a laser.
Love that chart above, thanks for sharing it.
 

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Practice practice practice! And forget anything about staging triggers, you'll never use that in a self defense scenario
 

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I know you just bought a gun, but in the long run it will save money to buy another.
a SP101 in 22lr. In a few thousand rounds the 22 will pay for itself in ammo savings.
And it takes most people thousands of rounds before they can shoot a small revolver well.
Thats the thing about small revolvers they are easy to shoot, BUT hard to shoot well.
Keep shooting the .357, but shoot the .22 alot.
Stick with it the more you shoot, the better you will get.
 

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I just got my SP 101 2.25" and went to the ranger For first time. It was my first handgun firing, too. After around 100 shots, I found that most of my shots were
at the below-right of the targeted area. Guess that it was about the trigger pull.

Does anyone has tips to practicing or mastering this before going to the range? The bullets here are very expensive. One box of simple 148 grain.38 special lead wadcutter costs me around US$23
I wold try dry fire drills. It helped when I was learning DAO pistols.
Practice the trigger pull while keeping the front sight on a target.
 

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I was low and right with my early shots but I'm using less finger on the trigger and that has helped.
 

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One of the great benefits to having a laser mounted on a handgun is the ability to dry fire/practice trigger pull and see what needs correcting. Doesn't take many boxes of ammo to equal the price of a laser.
A big plus one. It doesn't even need to be a pricy unit a cheap laser pointer, a piece of cloth and a rubber band holding it to the barrel will show where the gun is going while your pulling the trigger.
A few evenings trying to hold the laser on a light switch all the way through the trigger pull will reward you with signifigant gains.
 

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Practice practice practice! And forget anything about staging triggers, you'll never use that in a self defense scenario
Not necessarily. One might need to take a carefully aimed, accurate shot from a bit of a distance at a mass shooter running amok, and we should occasionally practice for it.

Sadly, this scenario could become more and more likely in America today.
 

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I know you just bought a gun, but in the long run it will save money to buy another.
a SP101 in 22lr. In a few thousand rounds the 22 will pay for itself in ammo savings.
And it takes most people thousands of rounds before they can shoot a small revolver well.
Thats the thing about small revolvers they are easy to shoot, BUT hard to shoot well.
Keep shooting the .357, but shoot the .22 alot.
Stick with it the more you shoot, the better you will get.
I totally agree about practicing a lot with a 22 cal. double action revolver.
Some of my most productive practice has been long afternoons running 300 rounds through my 22.
 

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I would like to meet the man who's taken a "staged hammer" shot with a DAO revolver under stress, and stopped an armed threat at a distance:) I want to shake his hand! With practice and a revolver with a decent action, you can put hits on a silhouette at 50 plus yards and even 100 when you get really good. I'm far from an expert handgun shooter but with an even DA pull I can hit at 25 yards without a problem. I just aim and pull straight through with a smooth, even trigger stroke. I am strongly against staging hammers, it's something that is never used in the real world of defensive shooting and you can't even do it with the old Colt DA's, it may cause the cylinder to under rotate and you get a click instead of a bang. I've done it myself with my older Colt Detective Special.
 

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It sounds like from the title you are shooting double action. To verify point of impact I would shoot a few in single action mode from a rest. My SP always shot low (even with 158 gr bullets) until I filed off some of the front sight. A little filing will make a big change in impact so go slow if yours shoots low as well.

The SP can be dry fired so be sure it is unloaded and then pick a target at home and squeeze. Be sure to observe where the sights are when it goes click. That will go a long way in telling you if you are pulling your shots.
 

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Good advice above, What works for me is concentrating on sight picture. Front site crisp target a bit fuzzy looking. Squeeze back steady till the gun goes bang. Try not to think about the trigger pull. Just stay on target. You can practice with snap caps or dry fire. This will help but you will know that the gun is not going to fire. You can try putting a couple of snap caps in with live rounds at the range then rotate the cylinder with out looking at it. Or have some one else load it for you with 2 or 3 caps. Then as you shoot if you are off target when the gun goes click you are flinching anticipating the bang.
38 special ammo is expensive, I pick up Winchester white box 130 grain fmj in 100 round packs from Bass Pro when they have it for around 40 bucks. I don't shoot it a lot because I know the gun is reliable and I shoot it very well. When I am in the mood to shoot a lot I take my 22.
Enjoy your gun and shoot safe.
 

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Also. don't get discouraged or frustrated if you're not shooting well..........I've been shooting DA revolvers since the early 90's when I was a kid, and on days when I'm not totally focused,tired, had too much coffee, etc. I'm shooting shotgun patterns at 10 yards in DA:) Keep in mind, shooters like Jerry Miculek and other master DA revolver shooters have probably fired more rounds in a good month than many of us will in a lifetime. Don't beat yourself up because your not dumping all 5 rounds into a cloverleaf in DA at 25 yards in under 2 seconds:)

Self-defense shooting will also not likely be under the most ideal conditions either, and odds are, if you need to shoot a DA revolver in self defense it will be at near contact range. The likelihood of taking a "long shot" at an active shooter is more likely these days than ever, but are still pretty remote. If you have a basic proficiency and are confident in your DA skills and your gun, you can take that 50+ yard DA shot in an extreme emergency if you absolutely have to.

Practice and training are the key.............I once read that a single Navy Seal team shoots more training rounds in a year than an entire Army Infantry Battalion does......and I believe it. Those guys are masters of the basics, and they shoot, shoot and shoot some more..........when I was an Army Infantryman, we might have had an M4 range once every few months, to maintain proficiency but master rifle shots are not made this way. Shooting is a perishable skill, if you don't use it, you lose it........I know I don't have the time or the ammo funds to become a master revolver shooter but maintaining a strong proficiency is just fine with me. If I can't get to the range, I'll take one of my revolvers and use dummy rounds and speed strips, and just practice reloading.

a .22 revolver is an excellent idea. Dry fire is a good way to train when you can't shoot, but there's no substitute for live rounds.
 

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Having a similar, if not identical, .22LR does give you inexpensive practice that helps with the larger gun. I have a LCR in .357 and .22.

I don't agree with never needing a staged trigger pull, I practice that with both guns as well as the straight DA pull. I find that using just the pad of my finger keeps my shots more centered.

In SD, minute of paper plate at ten yards is very acceptable, at a quick pace. Slower is tighter, but in SD shooting you don't have the luxury of time.
 

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I know you just bought a gun, but in the long run it will save money to buy another.
a SP101 in 22lr. In a few thousand rounds the 22 will pay for itself in ammo savings.
And it takes most people thousands of rounds before they can shoot a small revolver well.
Thats the thing about small revolvers they are easy to shoot, BUT hard to shoot well.
Keep shooting the .357, but shoot the .22 alot.
Stick with it the more you shoot, the better you will get.
Couldn't agree more. We all have to decide for ourselves how to balance the need for a light carry gun and the need for a larger gun we can shoot more accurately. Smaller guns are tougher to master. Get that SP 22LR at some point down the road and start burning up ammo.
 

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RE: Master the DA Trigger

I agree with 'mishtub' about the 'laser/practice' concept. You can actually see where your flaws are, and learn to correct them. Also, breathing can play a part in accuracy. Relax, calm your heart rate, and get smooth with your breathing. Getting excited, or having a fast breathing/heart rate, can really throw your aim off. Also like the chart that 'JimB120' has posted, to show you common problems with accuracy. Best advice: Practice, practice, and practice some more! Ammo HAS become rather expensive. Not a cheap hobby/sport these days. At least you'll enjoy shooting your new revolver, and you'll hone your skills. Shoot as often as your wallet will let you. Best of luck! Better accuracy will come to you the more you shoot.
 
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