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Discussion Starter #1
I have a chance to buy a stainless .357 Blackhawk for a good price but Ruger really left behind some rough unfinished machine marks that are to hard not to notice. You can feel and see them, and i would like to know if i can wet sand them out and if so what gritt sand papper, maybe 1000gr. and then 1500gr. or start with some thing else. Please give me a shout...:confused:
 

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Hard to give specifics without knowing how bad they are and what type of finish you're looking for.

Usually 1000 grit or higher is way too fine.

Unless it already has a mirror finish from the factory or someplace else try around 600 and then go stronger if that isn't working.

Things to remember:
1-5) PATIENCE! You can't put metal BACK!
6) Have an overall plan BEFORE you start.
7) Even some of the Scotch Brite pads will make a contribution.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You can feel them but they do need to be leveld out some, the finish is your normal stainless finish it's not brushed.
 

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Here is one I am just finishing up. It had some pretty deep scratches so I had to start in those areas with 220 grit wet or dry (dry, wastes sandpaper but much less messy) around a sanding block(file,popsickle stick, dowel, etc. and worked up to 600 in several grade steps. Then to the buffing wheel using white polishing compound. Take your time and stay away from sharp edges and pin holes as much as possible.

I thought I had a picture of the frame but I guess not (later).
Here I am fitting a set of grips to it that I am making.
Ruger Single Six SS 5 1/2"
Barrel cut to 4 1/4
Ejector housing shortened to match
New sights,springs grips made (finish drying now)
Here is a video of my shop. Click on the picture.

Have fun.:)
 

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Blazer, I too use 3M wet & dry paper. Start anywhere from 320 or 400 grit than work your way through all the following finer grits: 600, 800, 1000, 1500 and if you want a mirror finish, 2000 grit. I've used both water and oil, both will do the job but with the really fine grits I think oil works better.

Working on flat surfaces, it's easiest to lay the sandpaper on a perfectly flat surface, I use a large piece of glass, and slide the gun parts back and forth over the abrasive. Make sure you keep the paper wet. Of course, finish it off with some Flitz or Mother's Mag Polish than hand buff to a mirror finish.

The most important thing is to start with a grit that's coarse enough to remove the scratches or machine tool marks. If you don't you'll end up with a beautiful mirror finish that highlights all the highly polished scratches and imperfections. Ask me how I know. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank's Quiet 1, The info was just what i was looking for. the main tooling marks that were left behind from Ruger are in the wrist part of the revolver inbetween the hamm,er on the down slopes where the back two screws ars locaited. in this area the slopes are real badly tooled, but what makes it so bad is it's right inbetween the screw holes.
 

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Well, if you're just looking to repair marks on one or two sections of the gun and not trying to do a complete polish job, you probably don't need to go higher than 800 or 1000 grit to match the original "satin" finish of the stainless.

Your other option is, call Ruger Customer Service and complain. They'll almost certainly offer to refinish it at no charge, including the shipping both ways. I recently bought a Super Blackhawk .44 Magnum with terrible fitting grips. It also had really deep tooling marks completely around the entire cylinder (which is not fluted). They offered to refinish it and refit the grips, all at their expense, but I didn't want to go through the hassle of returning it so I went ahead and did it myself. I polished the entire gun to a "high-polish" finish and it came out looking really nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I never had to send any gun back to Ruger in the 25+ years i have had and been shooting them, you don't think that they would think i am being nit pickey or any thing like that do you. I just want the gun to look good even if i am the only one looking at it, it will just make me feel better about the gun. Thank's for the push Quiet 1. ''LOL'' blazer......
 

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depending on just where the scratches may be will determine just what approach you will need,,,if on the curve or a rounded surface you can simply take some emery paper and tear off a narrow trip the length of the sheet, and like one would "shoe shine" go back and forth across, and it will blend in....and on flats, you need to use a 'block' or wood wedge,,,keep the paper straight, NOT curved so as to NOT wash out holes or round off edges,,,takes time and patience, and with practice you CAN learn.........heck I've been draw filing and polishing guns & gun parts since the 1960s , so have been around the block.......careful with power equipment and hand tools you can do more harm , than good............and learn how to use the various "grits" makes the job a lot easier........
 

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What others have said and I would add that a green scotch-brite pad matches the Ruger finish about perfectly for your final work.
 
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