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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back when I was a kid living at home I hunted every day in the Fall of the year after the chores were done. I would get off the School bus on a run, bust into the house, change clothes, grab my gun, a handful of shells, a bottle of Big Red and head for the barn. Feed the cows, fill the water tanks for the hogs and check the feeders to make sure the hogs still had feed. This activity was being repeated at my best friends farm which butted up to ours. We would meet at the fencerow and walk it to flush any grouse or rabbits on our way to the woods to squirrel hunt. We didn't worry about Cammo hunting outfits ( we didn't have any ),we wore what we had, blue jeans and flannel shirts and denim chore coats. Our cover scents were cow and hog manure, yet, we still were able to harvest our share of game with youthful enthusiasm. The Sun filtering down through the White Oak and Maple leaves that were a brighter orange than the Sun itself was warm on our faces and that bottle of Red Pop was the perfect drink to sip on while we waited on Mr. Bushytail to show himself. No matter who shot what, it was divided up equal to take home when our Mom's yelled out that it was time for Supper, and we would slowly trudge back to our houses to eat and afterwards do our homework, wishing that we were still in the woods.
Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
sheepdog,
Thanks for the kind words. I had thought about submitting stories from time to time, but never got around to doing it. I have several note books full of things that I've written and enjoy sharing them with friends and family. If you folks here on the Forum don't mind, I'll post a few every so often.
Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Jimbo, Back when I was young and living at home, Dad worked 2nd shift for years plus worked on our 160 acres. He would always wake us kids up and Mom would be making breakfast. While we caught up on what was going on at school and the chores he wanted us to do that evening, we were able to spend a little time with him. Dad would be walking towards the barn while we were getting on the school bus to start our days. Our day was over when we would get off that bus at 4:00, and by then, Dad was just getting a good start on his at the factory after already putting in at least 7 hours of work around the farm. Dad would get home a little after midnight, and try to get some sleep before the clock would go off at 6 am. He would always leave a note on the kitchen counter of chores that he would like for us to do in the evening time. Taking care of the livestock was always on the list. Summer would be hoeing in the garden, unloading a load of hay in the barn, or fixing fences. Winter time was often splitting a load of firewood and bringing it up to the house , and taking hay to the cows. My Brother and Sister are several years older than me and when I got to be in junior high school, they were off at College, and I did the chores by myself. I think I got the better end of the deal, while they were at College, I was getting an Education. Dad switched back to day shift when I was a Senior in High School and I got to spend more time with Him, and the older I got, the more I realized why he worked 2nd all those years. It wasn't because he wanted to, it was about providing for the family more. He made better money on 2nd shift, and could still farm during the days. He paid off the farm in my senior year and didn't have to worry about the bills as much, so he could switch back to day shift. Even though I didn't see Dad as much as I wanted to when I was a kid, I have him to thank for everything he provided. Above all, he provided Love and I am not ashamed of the fact that every time I talk to Him and my Mom , whether it be on the phone or when we go to visit, I tell them I love them.
Brian
 
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