Ruger Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,268 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,268 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
An interesting side note:

Do you know where SAAMI is located?

11 Mile Hill Rd.
Newtown, CT 06783

:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Every time I see this video I hurts me to see that ammo wasted... (but it's important info)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Every time I see this video I hurts me to see that ammo wasted... (but it's important info)
It was the first time I've seen the video and I agree, it's a waste of ammo. It was well worth it and doesn't have to be done again.

Thanks for posting it dv8r.
 

·
"The Real Deal"
Joined
·
7,976 Posts
Ah, the dreaded ammo fire. I can say due to my profession I am aware of this. I am not worried about ammo being stored, when I go into a house fire. However I am worried about powder containers, most made of plastic now days, and the provocation the powder will cause if enveloped by fire. My reloading area included. I say the best place to store powder is in a flammable cabinet, same as fuels. Ammo, i have heard it cook off inside houses on fire, no big deal. However I can mention a story that changed the way I look at firearms and fires. One afternoon we got dispatched to a house fire. 75% involvement. Upon arrival 3 LP tanks were being inpinged upon by flames, and overpressure valves were activating. That is an attentiom getter, only option keep water on them, or back away and let them blow. Well we cooled them, then began extinguishing the house as best we could. We progressed to the front door to make entry, but the floor fell through upon me putting my weight on it, so we had to fight it from the exterior. Well that involves moving from window to window and doing your best to extinguish as much as you can. Interior attacks are far more effective, although more dangerous. Any how I could hear ammo cooking off, and some gunshots come from the house. Well after the bulk of the fire was out, and smoke was clearing, I could see better inside through the windows. Turns out at one of the windows where I had been doing a window attack from their were 3 guns, laying pointing muzzle towards the window. They were heavily charred, a double barrel 12, 30/30 lever, and a 22 bolt. Well I being a gun guy decided to look at the remains of the guns. Well to my surprise the shotgun had 2 empty shells in its closed breach, lever gun same thing. So while the fire was burning, the rounds cooked off in the chamber of the gun, and probably blew the window out. I just thank god me and my guys were not standing in front of that window when they did. So ammo on fire no big deal, ammo loaded in a gun, or gun powder make me a little more edgy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
952 Posts
I've talked to my local fire department about my reloading supplies.
I was inquiring about local ordinances related to quantity of powder. They honestly didn't know and didn't seem too concerned.
I showed them pictures of my setup and gave them my address. I just want them to be safe in case they have to respond to a fire at our house.
This is the cabinet everything is in.

"Flamible" stickers have been added to all 4 sides. They can soak it or roll it outside as needed.
They seemed very interested in reloading and asked alot of questions. Nothing that got my tinfoil hat vibrating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Good idea in working with your local fire department. There are BATF regulations concerning the amount and storage of smokeless powder, gun powder and primers. Go online and search for BATF. Their website will give you the regulations. Regulations change but when I last checked, the powder limit was 30 pounds and had to be stored in wooden cabinet with a door that is not latched. This is so if the powder ignites, the door will be blown open before the pressure builds up to explosive pressie levels.
Primers are the main area of concern. Unlike smokeless powder, primers are explosives so make sure you have a plan to get them away from heat quickly.
Loaded ammo is also an issue. If heat ignites a round, you end up with the bullet going in one direction and the case in another direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,096 Posts
Here is info on the BATF's website concerning smokeless powder. You may be surprised!

Is smokeless powder designed for use in small arms ammunition subject to the explosives storage requirements?

Smokeless propellants designed for use in small arms ammunition are exempt from regulation under 18 U.S.C. Chapter 40 and the regulations in 27 CFR Part 555. However, it should be noted that persons engaged in the business of importing or manufacturing smokeless propellants must have a Federal explosives license. Additionally, smokeless propellant designed for use other than small arms ammunition is not exempt. Therefore, explosives products such as squibs, fireworks, theatrical special effects, or other articles that may be utilizing smokeless propellants are regulated and must be stored accordingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,051 Posts
I've talked to my local fire department about my reloading supplies.
I was inquiring about local ordinances related to quantity of powder. They honestly didn't know and didn't seem too concerned.
I showed them pictures of my setup and gave them my address. I just want them to be safe in case they have to respond to a fire at our house.
This is the cabinet everything is in.

"Flamible" stickers have been added to all 4 sides. They can soak it or roll it outside as needed.
They seemed very interested in reloading and asked alot of questions. Nothing that got my tinfoil hat vibrating.

It's a nice little set up !
 

·
"The Real Deal"
Joined
·
7,976 Posts
Here is info on the BATF's website concerning smokeless powder. You may be surprised!

Is smokeless powder designed for use in small arms ammunition subject to the explosives storage requirements?

Smokeless propellants designed for use in small arms ammunition are exempt from regulation under 18 U.S.C. Chapter 40 and the regulations in 27 CFR Part 555. However, it should be noted that persons engaged in the business of importing or manufacturing smokeless propellants must have a Federal explosives license. Additionally, smokeless propellant designed for use other than small arms ammunition is not exempt. Therefore, explosives products such as squibs, fireworks, theatrical special effects, or other articles that may be utilizing smokeless propellants are regulated and must be stored accordingly.
So best I understand, they do not regulate a person who is just privately using for reloading, and not selling anything, however if you are selling, your are under regulation.

I do know that their is fire codes or building codes that regulates how much powder, primers a retail store can have on display, their is an ordnance which varies from location to location. However the private citizen is responsible for their own safety on their private property, and probably legally liable for such.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top