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Code Slinger
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I have been keeping an eye open for one of these pistols for awhile now. When I find the right deal, one will come home with me... :)
 

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Keith, you keep an eye out, tyhere are some GOOD bargains out there for "shooters", and if stainless they will clean up pretty nice, if "let go" and not taken care of,they can look like "youknowwhat"....recently over on the other Ruger Forum, Ray Morgan was sellng off some of the Old Armies from the Jerry Wilson, estate, you may want to contact him as there were some really GOOD deals on some very collectible, priced good enough to shoot even....... good luck in your quest...........
 

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Keith:

First off, THANKS for this new forum.

2nd... Where (state) do you hail from?

I'm in ME but my Dad is in MA (Republik of...)... He's 89 and doesn't shoot his Old Army (7.5" stainless with adj sights) and when he sells it, he said he wants it "to go to someone who would really appreciate it". With your work on this forum, I'm thinking you'd fit the mold.

Send me a PM if interested, and I can check with my Dad. No guarantee of course, but he recently remarked that it was getting near time to move that one on...

Old No7
 

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I fired one of these beasts last weekend at the range. Wow...very cool!!!

<< Anal mode on >>

I must exhibit hubris by correcting Keith in referring to the Old Army as a "Pistol." A pistol has the chamber integral with the barrel, while a revolver has multiple chambers. I'm the kind of person who would look such a thing up.

<< Anal mode off >>

Gary
 

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Webster's New World "Pistol-a small firearm held and fired with one hand." Kinda like "magazine" and "clip"...and "bullet thangy"[}:)].....:D

US Military Dictionary Home > Library > Military > US Military Dictionary pistol
n. a small firearm designed to be held in one hand.





Home > Library > Reference > Britannica Concise Encyclopedia pistol

Small firearm designed to be operated with one hand. The name may derive from the city of Pistoia, Italy, where handguns were made as early as the 15th century. It was originally a cavalry weapon. However, because the firepower of pistols must be kept low in order to reduce them to manageable weight, and because only skilled soldiers can shoot them accurately beyond 10 yards, they have never been satisfactory military weapons. In legal use, pistols are most frequently carried by police and other security personnel and serve mainly as a defensive weapon of last resort. Their compact size, low cost, and ease of operation make them a common weapon in violent crime, so that pistols are a common object of laws regulating the ownership of firearms. The two classes of pistol are revolvers and automatics. Automatics have a mechanism, actuated by the energy of recoil, that feeds cartridges from a magazine in the grip.
For more information on pistol, visit Britannica.com.
 

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I had a feeling I'd be enlightened on this point. Like this is the first time it's ever been discussed.......

But I'm sticking by my guns!!! (If nothing else, the understanding I favor is more specific, whereas making "pistol" synonymous with "handgun" makes the term less specific). I shant push my preferences on others, however.

as usual, Wikipedia gives an interesting treatment:

Some handgun subtypes include single-shot pistols, revolvers, semi-automatic pistols, and fully automatic, or machine pistols.

The overlapping variations in meaning of the words "pistol" and "handgun" are discussed below.

[edit] Multiple senses of the word "pistol"
The word "pistol" is often synonymous with the word "handgun". Some handgun experts make a technical distinction that views pistols as a subset of handguns.[citation needed] In American usage, the term "pistol" refers to a handgun whose chamber is integral with the barrel, making pistols distinct from the other main type of handgun, the revolver, which has a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers. However, Commonwealth usage makes no distinction at a technical level—"pistol" may refer to revolvers, semi-automatics, or muzzle-loading/cap-&-ball handguns. For example, the official designation of the Webley Mk VI was "Pistol, Revolver, Webley No. 1 Mk VI", and the designation "Pistol No. 2 Mk I" was used to refer to both the Enfield Revolver and the later Browning Hi-Power semi-automatic.[1],[2],[3],[4]

In the 15th century the word "pistol" was used for small knives and daggers which could be concealed in a person's clothing.[citation needed] By the 18th century, the term came to be used exclusively to refer to handheld firearms. Practical revolver designs appeared in the 19th century, and it was in that century that the (sometimes-observed) technical differentiation in usage of the words "pistol" and "revolver" developed.[citation needed]
 

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This is from Merriam-Webster and they define these terms in the same manner I use and understand them. That is, the terms are defined by the location of the chamber that houses the propellant charge or the cartridge, whichever the case may be.


Main Entry: re·volv·er
Pronunciation: ri-'väl-v&r, -'vol- also -'vä-v&r or -'vo-v&r
Function: noun
1 : one that revolves
2 : a handgun with a cylinder of several chambers brought successively into line with the barrel and discharged with the same hammer

Main Entry: pis·tol
Pronunciation: 'pis-t&l
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French pistole, from German, from Middle High German pischulle, from Czech píst'ala, literally, pipe, fife; akin to Czech pistet to squeak
1 : a handgun whose chamber is integral with the barrel; broadly : HANDGUN
 

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How'd that old song go? "You say to may to and I say to ma to..."-and how'd that old saying go "One good dig deserves another"...there're a few differences that are both right...and not worth bringing up.....:D[}:)][}:)][}:)]
 

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<center>Prior to 1836 or so, every hand held firearm could be referred to as a "pistol". Then Samuel Colt marketed "Colt's Patent Revolving Pistol". Soon the Colt was being called a "revolver". And so on...

Amazing in how many 30s and 40s gangsta flicks any old handgun was a "revolver". A hundred years of habit.
</center>
 
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