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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I like old furniture, sometimes I like older women........but that’s another thread, complicated too.

I picked up another table the other day and thought I’d share some pics of it and others. The tops on these things are off the hook.
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They are a thing of beauty for sure. Love the workmanship. They are nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rick, the second table, the one with the really crazy top, I know for a fact it’s over 100 years old. I know the family and the original owner died in ‘78 and she was 97 then.

I love 6 and 3 legged tables.....so cool.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Fine workmanship there! I love what I see. Enjoy them! 😊
I agree, and to think some of this work was probably done with hand tools. I seriously doubt I could do this with modem tools.......
 
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I agree, and to think some of this work was probably done with hand tools. I seriously doubt I could do this with modem tools.......
Most was done with hand / manual tools probably including the wood lathe depending on its size.

That there is some real craftsmanship and elegance. I have some hair loom quality pieces at home also.


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I like old furniture, sometimes I like older women........but that’s another thread, complicated too.
Ain’t it, though?

Lovely table. I have refinished a few, preferring them to modern pieces. That said, if you pay for cutom work today, You can still find quality. I did for two industrial-design bar stools, shipped to me from a Canadian firm. They are built like a GP100 And will outlast me.

As for old? Old guns, which I do not work on, and old cars, which I do. I have restored one, save for the paint job (next year).
 

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Nice craftsmanship, those quality pieces are hard to come by ...
 
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they are examples of great craftsmanship

not exactly certain why the page loaded with the last picture having a warning that I had to click through
 

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Nice looking tables.
Wife and I found a Lane cedar chest for $15 at a local thrift store yesterday. Made 03/19/43. 77 yrs old.
Needs to be refinished on the outside and some veneer work but the inside is mint.
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They definitely don't make 'em like that anymore.
 
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I agree, older stuff was built by hand with craftsmanship that today has been forgotten with crank it out as fast as you can, cheaply as possible. I perfer that stuff too. You can look at older cars, older houses, older firearms, for example and see they were built with determination to put out a great finished product. One reason when i bought my house, it was built in 78, strong and 16 penny nails, no osb boards and gussett plates. My fathers 1948 chevy coupe you can stand on the fender and wont dent it, try that with a new vehicle with plastic parts. Heck the all aluminum ford pickups melt ldown to nothing like a candle if they catch on fire. I have seen it.


But thanks for sharing, thats an awesome piece.
 

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Very nice. However, I refuse to compliment your wood. 🙄
 

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I shared some of the pics here with my aging neighbor. He is a Korean War Vet and a cabinet maker. It brought a smile to his face. The first thing he stated was that the work has been done with "hand tools" and would be very hard to duplicate without the correct tools from that time. A art that is hard to duplicate with modern tools and mindset. It was good to see him smile again. Thanks again for the share. He will not be with us much longer and glad I took the time to visit him.
 

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My personal preference in furniture is Scandinavian Teak, with smooth lines and very UN-ornate. My wife's, too, so when we wed in married matrimony, we joined households with the same style.

But...(there's always a "but...")

We have inherited some family furniture that we will not part with, and had a chance to inherit some we (I) declined. Our home is only so big...

We have a tool chest from her paternal grandfather, hand made by him, all with hand tools. Utilitarian - not a thing of design beauty - but well made. One of the things her father did (and I would recommend all here do the same) was to write a brief history of the piece and paste it somewhere on it that isn't typically visible (like on the underside): when you are no longer around to explain the significance of a piece of furniture, that written history helps in determining if your survivors choose to keep the family heritage in the family or surrender it to an estate auction.. That tool chest is about 3'w X 2'd X 2'h and makes for a great end-table. It made the journey in a crowded U-Haul trailer from Charleston, SC to VA. We also have a five-drawer dresser, hand-made, that was a wedding gift to my wife's maternal family (Fairbanks-Morse): yes, the same Fairbanks of Hollywood fame and the same Morse of...you know the deal...Again, courtesy of my FIL's history placards.

For my side of the family, there are few: a lifetime of Army moving pretty much destroyed most of our family heirlooms...And Dad wasn't keen on getting expensive stuff, knowing it would likely be destroyed or stolen during a move. But he inherited some furniture after his father passed, with a few things that were both notable and (as my brother and I described ) as a monstrosity. My brother and I both preferred Scandinavian Teak furniture, with its clean lines, so neither of us were interested in a meticulously hand-carved basin (standing six feet high) as ornate as anyone could conceive. It was done by Dad's Grandfather, all hand-tooled sometime in the 1800s. In terms of workmanship, it could hardly be described as a "monstrosity": all hand-carved in Rosewood. Neither my brother nor I had room for it, so it still sits in storage in PA, awaiting a final decision. Too close to remove from the family, but also too ornate/large to keep for the two surviving sons. I doubt the surviving grandchildren will want it, but then again, my nephew likes Sushi, so there's no predicting.

We have a small fold-out table in our barn that was my maternal Grandmother's - Grammy. Aside from the dog I grew up with (Betsy), Grammy was my best friend. It is nothing special - probably something Woolgreens would sell in the '50s, but it was so much a part of my (and her) history and memories. It was her kitchen table and where she and my parents and I would play Canasta and sip tea. It was re-finished once (probably by my Dad). It would go for $5 at an auction, but is priceless to me for the memories.

Antique furniture can be wonderful, but it generally doesn't fit my lifestyle (we don't need more furniture). But with each piece there is a very definite family history that we sometimes fail to comprehend. In the end, when my wife and I have departed this mortal coil, my nephew will be faced with a monumental challenge. I would think the Scandinavian teak furniture will go to an estate auction, and the simple, handmade furniture with a family history will stay with him.

He'll need to build an addition to his home...
 

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Beautiful workmanship, and the detailed inlays make them truly extra special. Congratulations on finding them!
 
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