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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry for all the Marlin talk on this Ruger forum, but I have to share this. Got my .357 lever action back from Marlin just in time to take it to the range today.

Just to see how it worked, I shot mostly while resting my elbows on the bench. This is only 30 feet, I know that's not far for a rifle while resting on a bench, but I don't think I've ever put six shots this close together at ANY distance with ANY gun! I am happy with this, let me tell you.



12 shots at 50 feet (bench rest) also pretty nice!



And finally, 75 feet, which I will say is freakin FAR. 12 shots.



Everything high right. Me? Or the sights??
 

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I still see a blackhawk in your future.
 

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quote:Originally posted by deputy125

I still see a blackhawk in your future.
Oh yeah, every levergunner needs a Blackhawk in the same caliber as their rifle.
 

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Nice shooter... Worth the trip back to the factory, especialy since it was free!!!

You've got me thinkin' I'm gonna get my Winchester Model 94 Ranger 30-30 to the range this weekend...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I'm really glad I sent it to Marlin. Only cost me shipping one way. Today I got the owners manual and original box from my neighbor. So this weekend I will try to break it down according to the manual and clean it real good. Marlin changed those parts, test fired a magazine each of .38 and .357, but the gun was dirty when I got it back. I need to get comfortable with taking it apart enough to clean it well, because I get the feeling this will be making regular trips to the range with me!
 

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Eddie,
You know that if you get into reloading the 38, you can save enough over time to get that blackhawk!
Save your brass over the next several months. Pick up any off the ground that others discard.(get a bunch that way!) Using lead bullets, your reloads with your brass would run about $4.50/50 rds(roughly depending on componets). You can get many reloads out of a .38 case if you don't max it out. You will pay for the press/dies in no time and save money in the not to distant long run. Plus it is also a good hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I haven't given much thought to reloading, but ammo prices might drive me there.

My dad used to reload everything from musket bullets with molten lead and stuff, to shotgun shells. He had this like nine or ten stage shotgun loader, and my sister and I would help him. One of us putting the wad in, the other putting primer in, putting empty shells in, taking full ones out and putting them in the box, etc. A little assembly line. Or slave labor, depending on your point of view...

But seriously, how much does all that stuff cost that you'd need to reload .38s? The equipment I mean.
 

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Equipment costs depends on how fancy or how fast you want to reload. Choose the equipment you want. Some folks are very loyal to their brand so opinions will vary like ford vs chevy. i believe that Lee Precision is a very good place to start. Many start on a single stage press (Lee--$20 to $30). Slow but steady.

I got a lee hand press(kit--$25) and a lee turrent press + i dabble with the old classic lee loaders($20) for grins(but slow).

They have something just about for every budget. RCBS is considered top hand. There are numerous choices out there but lee is a good place to start--and stay if you like it.

The lee turrent kit with all the extras(around $90) is a good choice if time spent reloading is a consideration. The hand press comes in handy if i am not in a hurry and don't have access to a bench. Lee also has many help "freebee" videos on line.

For pistol caliber dies, i again like lee carbide dies. They have a powder thru die that speeds thing up with the turrent kit powder dispenser. Rifle dies i perfer rcbs.

When it comes time to buy, check out Midway USA, Natchez, or similar outfits on line. Can sometimes get some 2nd hand presses at gun shows.

A lot of folks start out on a single stage press. But a reloading bench of some sort is required. No bench?---that is what the hand press is for.

www.leeprecision.com
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Deputy, I like those videos on that Lee site, watched a couple to get a sense of the process. Cool.

What is the downside/risk of handloading? I can't remember where, but it seems I've come across warnings or warrantees that say no handloads, etc. Are they not as reliable or safe?
 

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The manufacturers tell you not to use handloads for liability reasons. There is no standard for handloads other than the caution of the person producing them. There is nothing inherently unsafe about handloads other the person putting them together. Concentrate on what you're doing with no distractions, like a ball game on TV, and follow the recommended procedures and you can produce ammunition that is better than factory. Safety first.
 

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+1 on coffeepot's post. Gun makers worry about a reloader building insane loads, wrong size bullet, etc, etc causing damage to the gun and or injury to shooter. Think of it like someone puting kerosene for fuel and 90 weight gear oil in an engine for a Harley Davidson and then expect Harley to fix it for free!
It is a sue happy world we live in. By specifying factory ammo, they are putting the monkey on federal or remington's back for any ammo problems.
Follow directions in a major load book such as Hornady, Speer, lee, etc and you will be fine.
The other big beneifit of reloading besides saving money is that you can taylor loads that you like. Loading non-+p target loads in the 38 often means increased accuracy and more control.

Take it slow and steady starting out, as with shooting. The Lee stuff is A good way to get involved at minimal expense.
Again i stress a good bench is required for a regular press. When i got started, i had no bench and i "c" clamped my press to the dinner table under a board. It worked until the honeymoon wore off!
The hand press will work if there is no bench. and yes i sometimes use the lee powder dippers with the hand press for powder charges.
The Lee loader works fine on the front porch as all that is required there is a hard surface and a mallet. But is is SLOW as in say building 20 rds an hour.
A bench mount press is really the way to go.
 

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Glad to see everythig worked out great. If you get the chance reload for it. You will see those groups get better, and longer distacnes.
 

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Glad they fixed it right and glad you're enjoying it-I've always believed a rifle and handgun using the same ammo makes a lot of sense...
 

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they are good folks to deal with.
 
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