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Discussion Starter #1
  1. So I finally got all my reloading set up the other day . Built my little mini bench and set my lyman turret press up deprimed 50 44 magnum casings put'em in the tumbler for awhile got them nice and clean then went to resizing all the case's ( Made sure to bottle neck brush and cleaned the primer pocket out ) Man this really felt great Peace of Mind In my Own Little World . So I was thinking ..... I hadn't pulled that Ram Down since the fall of 1999 right before my dear mother had passed away . Then after locking the resizing die down and turning the turret I checked the size with my dial calipers Good To Go . On with the primeing . After that the belling . This was a little tricky but I got it with a little work and thought process and locked that die down . Now for the rest of the story . First time reloading for Revolver's . So got set up for powder and bullets Hornady 240gr xtp with H110 powder . Seating and Roll Crimping all in 1 motion . It was tricky I must admit but I think I got it . My first bullet was a little shy of the C.O.L it was 1.56 and suppose to be at 1.60 c.o.l . Will this Hurt if it's a little less ? But I readjusted my die and I think I got it . If you will check my crimp to see if there good I was using a hornady factory bullet for a reference and mine was crimped better than there's here's a pic mine on the right and hornady on left
And also when I was roll crimping and seeting the bullet there was a little brass that was cut off from the crimp is this normal or did I put to much of a belly on it. ? Sorry if this post was long winded . Any advice would be appreciated



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Hirschjäger
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My opinion:
  • You're crimped into the bullet's cannelure, so the difference in COL isn't significant enough to be an issue.
  • You may have a little bulge in the crimp, indicating a little too much. However, many like (as I do) a very firm crimp on their magnum loads. I would see if they chamber in the cylinder. If they do, I'd say they're good to go. If not, they may be fodder for the puller.
You may get a lot of flak for seating and crimping in the same step, because many do those steps separately. I do both in one step for the rounds I reload for which I do not have a Lee Factory Crimp Die. I usually have good results.

Aqualung
 

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As long as you aren’t working at a max load, then a few thousandths difference in seating depth probably won’t make much difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies . I loaded the cylinders up and they all chambered great and from the naked eye look great . I rechecked the length with my dial calipers and they are .004 below 1.600 col . This is just 3 of the bullets that I reloaded the rest turned out great at 1.600 col . One thing is for sure you don't need that much of a belly in the brass to get the bullet to seat and this was the first time for reloading revolver I'm pretty happy with the results . Carbide dies are great also so . Also not going to put that much of a crimp on them next time . I've got 50 more rounds in the tumbler getting ready for another batch .


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Back off on the crimp a tiny bit. A couple thousands will not make much of a difference. I don't crimp and seat in the same step as it never sets well with me.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
THANKS . Yeah that's exactly what I was thinking so to . I think my main problem was I was putting to much belly in the casing for the bullet so I backed off on that a few thousands also .



Thanks for all the great advice .
 

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Woodsey, First, it's "belling", not belly, but we understand what you mean. This term comes from the expander die when you make the case mouth look like a bell. Most die sets are designed for single-stage presses, however they will work on most any press providing you do a few things. The sizer/decapping die is fine, as is the expander die. Where you can run into problems is with a combined bullet seater and crimp die. Yes, you can seat bullets and crimp with one pull of the handle but a much better approach is to separate these two steps. When you crimp cartridges while seating bullets, the cases like to swell up and can become to fat to chamber. Separating the two functions will give you much better control of both functions and result in better ammo.

First the bullet seater function .... what you want to do is seat bullets to their "book depth" with no crimp at all or seated where the case mouth is centered on the crimp groove. This is done by backing out the die body several turns so it doesn't apply any crimp. Lock the die using a lock ring. Next, adjust the bullet seater stem until the bullet is seated to the proper depth then lock the seater stem. Seat all the bullets in your "sized, primed, and powdered" cases. Once all bullets have been seated, release the lock nut on the bullet seater stem and back it out about 10 turns, then lock it in place again. Next, with the handle pulled down, tighten the crimp/seater die body until you feel it make contact with the case mouth. Tighten the die body a bit more to fine tune the die body until you get the desired crimp, then tighten the body lock nut. Crimp all cartridges in your batch.

I realize this is an extra step that slows the process down, however you will notice an improvement in quality. It's very difficult to adjust a crimp when the bullet is still moving from the seater stem. The best way to deal with this on a turret or progressive press is to buy a second seater/crimp die or a crimp only die, that way you won't have to mess with your seater/crimp dies unless you change bullets.

Keep in mind .... a proper roll crimp or taper crimp only adds about 10% to the overall case neck tension. 90% comes from the body of the case. In other words, the crimp is not intended to be the primary thing that holds the bullet in place. If you over crimp, chances are the case will expand and won't chamber easily. A few tips ... align the case mouth with the center of the crimp groove of jacketed bullets. For lead bullets, crimp a bit harder in the crimp groove so the case mouth holds the bullet tight. For plated or coated bullets with no crimp groove, use a taper crimp die. You don't want to break through the thin plating or coating so don't over crimp these cartridges or you will get excessive bore fouling.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Iowegan . Yes I'm going to get another roll crimp die and a taper crimp die . Seat them first and then crimp . But do you think the one's that I already have done be ok or Should I yank them and start over . I chambered all 50 in my revolver and they fell in slick as a whistle no problem what so ever ?



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Woodsey, Your reloads will probably shoot just fine. When crimps are uniform, you typically get tighter velocity spreads and better accuracy but as you noted, only a few were different.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks All . Yeah that's Definitely the route I'm going to take . Going down to the lgs today to see what I can find but that's just it . He always has a pretty line of new gun's in the show case . LOL Maybe I can get a new roll crimp die and a new gun .



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Discussion Starter #15
Went down to the sportsman warehouse yesterday and no crimp dies but but I did get a pound of Unique powder and 5 boxes of wlp primers and I looked at a couple of S&W's 44mag and 357mag 6in ss . They sure are smooth actions but man the were dirty . I asked the guy at the counter Hey are these display model's and his reply was No and I said Don't you think you ought put a shine on them I said give me a cleaning rag I will do it but he reached down below the counter and started to clean it after I said something . The price was 935.00 for the 44mag and the 357mag was 100.00 less . There were a lot of scuff mark's on the cylinder were it look like people were misusing them so neither 1 of them came home with me .



THANKS
 

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Your loads look fine to me. If you are crimped in the crimp groove you are good to go. The only caveat would be that if you crimp too much you may bulge the case to,where it won’t chamber. Looks like you don’t have that problem. Seating and crimping in the same step is fine, but if you prefer to do it separately, you van back the die out to the point where it doesn’t crimp, seat the bullet, lower the die for the crimp you want and back the seating stem out.

Of course, you would do this in batches.
nice work.
 

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Good looking loads!
Don't worry if you can't trim or seat your brass and reloads to a gnat's fanny! there are manufacturing differences in the brass, and the bullets that make exact measurements a matter of luck most times. Even max loads will not act up for +- a few thousandths one way or the other...as long as it is not too much! Sure, get as close as you can, but the fellows with the whiz-bang progressive reloading machines live with the lengths that their loaders turn out, and some of them never trim their brass more than once, if at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Flyboy61 . That's the advice I was looking for . I was trying to be perfect but there's no way you can be . That's what I did I got them as close as I could and I'm going to live with them and shoot'em up . I also seen the difference in each manufacturers brass and bullets as you quoted in your post . Thanks for the Education and Sound Advice my Friend
 
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