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I have a 2.25 spurless SP101 357. I have put beautiful wood inserts in the handle. I've put a night sight on it. I've polished the fool out of the internals, replaced springs, put in trigger and hammer shims. I used MCARBO stuff and it was great. There is nothing left to do with it. I practice. But I don't shoot it NEAR as well as my LCR 357 with nothing done to it. And it really ticks me off! I want to shoot my SP101 as well, and I have really tried, practice, practice. The trigger is not heavy and its smooth. Dang it!

I'm wondering if I should just decide to love my ugly LCR. The one thing I give the SP101 is that it is much more pleasant to shoot 357s. I usually practice with 38s and do one cylinder of 357. And for some reason, I'm more accurate with 357s but I just can't do that many with the recoil.

I'm thinking of getting a 327 LCR to carry and get the extra round. I was going to get a GP100 357 but I'm afraid I'll have the same frustrations.

I guess I'm just whining. But any insight or commiseration will be welcome!
 

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Do you think it has anything to do with the fixed rear sight? Are you using the center of the pad of your trigger finger? Are you always shooting low left, low right, shotgun pattern? Are you left handed or right handed? Have you tried fatter cast bullets?

Ok,you see where this is going. Your fixed sight sp101 may not be shooting your ammo to point of aim. Does your lcr have an adjustable sight? Usually with a fixed sight gun, you are better off finding a load that shoots to your point of aim, and stick with that load. A little more information will help alot.
 

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This is about the time when I would put the SP101 in the safe and just shoot the LCR. In a few months, switch back and see how you do.
 

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I have had guns I wanted to love and should have loved but we just didn't form a love connection. In the end if it is more than a range toy then you need to be able to shot it well and get it so its instinctual.

Having said that .. I do not own either gun but do have the blue guns for each. For whatever reason the LCR feels like you can palm it more. my hand envelops the gun more so than with the SP101.

I dont know anything about the trigger pull on these guns but my GP has a fairly long trigger pull so it could give someone who doesnt have a ton of revolver experience a lot of time to anticipate the shot and flinch.

So the next questions .. are you grouping? If so where is the group in relation to where you are aiming?

How high up on the grip are you holding the SP and what are you doing on the support hand?

Dry fire here is your friend. Having shot more rugers than smiths it took me a little bit to get used to the Smith trigger. A couple of snap caps and I would shot things on TV being very careful to see if that front sight moves.

Do that 30 or so times a night while watching tv and see how much you improve!!
 

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Do you think it has anything to do with the fixed rear sight? Are you using the center of the pad of your trigger finger? Are you always shooting low left, low right, shotgun pattern? Are you left handed or right handed? Have you tried fatter cast bullets?

Ok,you see where this is going. Your fixed sight sp101 may not be shooting your ammo to point of aim. Does your lcr have an adjustable sight? Usually with a fixed sight gun, you are better off finding a load that shoots to your point of aim, and stick with that load. A little more information will help alot.
All great questions. Both the LCR and SP101 have what I would call a "gutter rear fixed sights". I'm sure there is a better term. I think the other answer is shotgun pattern. The SP just has a lot more variation where the LCR is close to point of aim a tiny bit high and left but close to target.

I'm right handed and I'm not saying that the ammo wouldn't help? I just don't know. But if I take both guns to a range session and use the same ammo out of both, I experience the same as I have described.

My other thoughts are... Is there such a thing as a big variable from one gun to the next (within SP101s)? Maybe I just love the LCR trigger way better than even a great, smooth SP101?
 

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I have found that the trigger on my 3” 38spl lcrx has a better trigger than my 4.2” sp101 22lr. This is understandable because the sp101 is a rimfire. I also didn’t like the factory grip on the sp101. It is great for concealed carry, but it is very small. If you are not carrying it maybe that is something you could try.
 

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I just bought an sp101 and I have been having the same thought as you. I still do not like the trigger even after it has been worked on. My GP100 is light years better and it is stock, not even polished just shot and dry fired. Anyways, i am really considering gettin an LCR now.
 

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I have a 2.25 spurless SP101 357. I have put beautiful wood inserts in the handle. I've put a night sight on it. I've polished the fool out of the internals, replaced springs, put in trigger and hammer shims. I used MCARBO stuff and it was great. There is nothing left to do with it. I practice. But I don't shoot it NEAR as well as my LCR 357 with nothing done to it. And it really ticks me off! I want to shoot my SP101 as well, and I have really tried, practice, practice. The trigger is not heavy and its smooth. Dang it!

I'm wondering if I should just decide to love my ugly LCR. The one thing I give the SP101 is that it is much more pleasant to shoot 357s. I usually practice with 38s and do one cylinder of 357. And for some reason, I'm more accurate with 357s but I just can't do that many with the recoil.

I'm thinking of getting a 327 LCR to carry and get the extra round. I was going to get a GP100 357 but I'm afraid I'll have the same frustrations.

I guess I'm just whining. But any insight or commiseration will be welcome!
My EDC is the LCR 327, good shooting pistol ... however it's real snappy with the 100 grain American Eagle, which is fairly easy to find ... I prefer the 85 grain which isn't easy to find ...
 

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I think your frustration derives from the trigger. Double action is an acquired taste

The lcr's double action is one of the best out of the box triggers out there.
The sp101, gp100 etc will take a bit if patience and practice to learn a smooth straight back trigger pull. You will even get to the point where you can stage the DAO trigger.
 

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I own both a SP101 Spurless .357 and an LCR357. I shoot both equally well. My LCR is my EDC because it weighs less and is easier to conceal. I also own a 3" LCRx357 that I shoot exceptionally well. I did a trigger and hammer spring replacement on my SP101 with hammer shims too.

All that being said, the snubnose is hard to master, but master it you can. It just takes patience and practice, practice, practice and then more practice. I probably have in excess of 3,000 rounds thru each gun. I would venture to say I have double that in dry fire cycles. I can instantly stage the hammer of both guns and then steady and slowly pull the remaining fractions of the trigger to bring my shot on my target. That helps a great deal in getting steady and on target. One other thing I find helpful is when I hold it two handed I place the index finger of the weak hand on the frame just under the cylinder and apply pressure pushing the gun into the strong hand. I also apply opposite pressure with the strong hand and I find that combination holds the gun rock steady for a more accurate shot.

I also practice weekly. Hope this helps.
 

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For me, I like to get to a table and use a rest to find out what the gun does on paper. Then you can see what both guns are like and with different loads. To me this is the way I start to evaluate my gun. Takes out a lot of the human error.
 

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Two thoughts to add. The trigger can be light due to polishing and shimming and all but does it have a straight through pull without stacking? If it stacks some work to remove it could improve things.

Second aspect alluded to above would be the grips. Perhaps a different grip in size and/or configuration would help. On some of my guns I have had to go through a couple of grips to get what I desired in terms of trigger reach and girth and placement.

A third thought comes to mind. Perhaps a different front sight would work better for you. On my SP I started with a XS Big Dot tritium sight but eventually went to their standard dot one instead.
 

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Have you checked the cylinders on both guns for proper size? If the holes in the SP cylinder are not proper size or not completely round it could affect accuracy. I know that’s usually a .45 Colt issue, but it can happen on any revolver.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of the stock grips on the sp101. I have found that the Hogue monogrip to be more comfortable, more to get ahold of, and positions your hand a little higher on the revolver, and the rubber ones aren't expensive. The ergonomics of the little sp101 can be a little difficult to get used to. I have found the larger framed GP100 easier to achieve a consistent double action trigger pull and to shoot more accurately, especially the model with adjustable sights.
 

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I love my SP101, the only thing I did was changed the trigger spring, put in a Wolf 10 lbs spring. Single action and double action feel about the same and it is smooth and fairly light. I shoot 38's 357'mags, and some incredibly hot 357's . POI is close enough for social work. Ruger makes great revolvers I am sure yours will be great.
 

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love my SP. its such a tank. it shoots .357 mag loads very accurately, not so much .38spl. its a blast to shoot and will always be one of my favorite revolvers. I never changed anything to it, it doesn't need anything to be changed or improved.
 

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Try shooting it single action. You said it’s spurless, start pulling the trigger and pull the hammer back with your finger the rest of the way.

How is the cylinder lock up, does it rotate much with the trigger pulled all the way? Also check the cylinder to barrel alignment with the trigger pulled.



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Do you think it has anything to do with the fixed rear sight? Are you using the center of the pad of your trigger finger? Are you always shooting low left, low right, shotgun pattern? Are you left handed or right handed? Have you tried fatter cast bullets?
Ok,you see where this is going. Your fixed sight sp101 may not be shooting your ammo to point of aim. Does your lcr have an adjustable sight? Usually with a fixed sight gun, you are better off finding a load that shoots to your point of aim, and stick with that load. A little more information will help alot.
I've had several people come to me, over the years, and they are having trouble between different handguns (both pistols and revolvers) and I've told them to do the same thing I do when I get a new handgun...
Buy several different bullets (different manufacturers, grains, JHP's, FMJ's, etc.) and shoot them to see which shoots best in the new handgun...and then stay with that load for that handgun.

For example...my 2.25" SP101 shoots 110 and 125 grain .357's very accurately, but not so much with 158 grain...whereas my 3" SP101 shoots the heavier grain bullets more accurately than the 2.25" shoots the lighter bullets. And my Ruger Commander shoots Hornady's 200 grain JHP XTP's just dead-on accurate...they're rare to find on a shelf, but I have managed to accumulate a few boxes of that particular ammo for it!

It can be a little bit expensive, but it's worth it to figure out which ammo shoots best in which handgun!
 

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You have to ask yourself what you bought this gun for.

You purchased a relatively heavy, snubby revolver with the hammer lopped off so that it can only be fired double action. And you purchased it in a cartridge caliber better suited to long barrels — a cartridge that has so much powder that the short barrel can’t even get the full benefit out of it, leaving you dealing with a lot of flash and blast.

As an outside observer, I personally have no idea what such a gun is good for. For me, it would be too heavy for shorts pocket carry in the summer. It would be too bulky for jeans pocket carry in the winter. The lack of single action capability and shorter barrel wouldn’t make it a perfect “kit gun” for carrying hiking or fishing; for that I’d choose a standard hammer 3” or 4” barrel.

About the only things I see this gun being great at is as a bedside table gun, or to carry under a jacket in the winter if you live in a northern climate and subscribe to the theory that hypothetical assailants will be wearing heavier clothes.

For those limited purposes that this gun is designed for. how much accuracy do you feel you need, and how far out of line is the gun, really?
 

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The op said he is shooting shotgun patterns... I dont gamble .. but I would lay coin down that it is not ammo or gun related. Its the shooter.

I wont get into whether the gun serves a purpose or not .. they make lots of different guns so we have choices.

So here is some advice. I am going to bet flinching. yea flinching can lead to a "group" that might indicate flinching but not everyone flinches the same.

First .. I mentioned Dry fire. Dry fire is king.

Get your strong hand as high up on the grip as you can. I mean right under the hammer. Curl your thumb down and make a fist.
Your middle finger should be as far up behind the trigger as you can get.
Make sure the part of your wrist that is facing the ceiling is tight. Consciously engage the muscles there.

Take you support hand and first place your fingers of your support hand and put them over the fingers of you strong hand and then pull back until your hand is along the gun. Imagine that you are clam shelling. So the front is locked and you then close down on the rear.

Miculek positions his support hand thumb kind of over his strong hand thumbnail. I have never been good with that grip so my support hand thumb pushes down tight just on top of the thumb knuckle of my strong hand. It sits on top but forward.

Now take any stance that suits you and lean into the gun. Right now that gun should feel like superman couldnt take it out of your hands. You should now have completely enveloped the grip.

Now .. grip it while you look down the sights. When you get to where its shaking back off. Try and remember that spot.

Now .. YMMV but ..I find that curling the trigger finger back in a smooth motion straight through and allowing my finger to slide across the trigger face as i do so will give me the smoothest trigger pull.

So first a grip that feels like almost the entire gun is covered with meat
Second how tight we grip
Third how smooth we pull the trigger
Now commit it to muscle memory (Dry fire)

Point it at a clock or whatever .. watch that front sight. At this point it will usually only move if you are doing something wonky with the trigger pull. Try it again .. keep going until that sight doesnt budge. Now go to the range and use just some 38's.

I have a gutter sight Gp I can make a 1.5 inch hole with at 9 yds unsupported in DA only.

You could of course .. just sell it but .. here is the truth .. You will likely go your whole life without have to use your gun in self defense. So why not just enjoy shooting. Part of the enjoyment of it and other athletic endeavors I have pursued is getting through some of the walls that crop up. Breaking through one challenge in order to find another.

I shoot probably twice a month and have been for many years .. if I wasnt always trying to do something I am not great at I would quickly get bored.
 
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