Ruger Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a Cimarron/Uberti SAA in .45 Colt, with 7 1/2-inch barrel. I had read a piece in the April 2017 Handloader by Brian Pearce discussing this very revolver and how Uberti had been working continually to make it better, including reaming the cylinder throats to .452 for improved cast bullet accuracy.
After shooting the revolver and talking with a former Cimarron gunsmith about what it would take to make the historically accurate sights useful to my eyes for hunting purposes, I decided to solve the problem by finding a New Model Blackhawk, 7 1/2-inch, which I picked up from my dealer yesterday.
I should load some of the RCBS 45-270 SAA slugs I recently cast for this revolver I told myself. And then for the heck of it I checked the fit of these slugs, sized .452. Rats. It's that same issue that has plagued Ruger sixguns, particularly in .45 Colt, for many many years. Not only are the throats on the new cylinder too small, they are also inconsistent, running somewhere between .450 and .451 depending on which one. I'm going to have to ream them, which is no big deal, but it would be nice if Ruger could run tighter QC regarding a known problem especially with their .45 Colt revolvers -- a problem Uberti has solved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I was told they use a gang reamer and if one wears out only that one is replaced. That is why the throats are different sizes. Acceptable for jacketed bullets not so much for us lead guys.

I have many and plan to get more 357 rugers so I bought the reamer and pilot pack. Quick and easy to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
I never bothered doing any cylinder measurements before shooting lead bullets this year.
My Vaquero .357 Magnum has 5 chambers that pin gauged at.358 " and 1 at .357 ".
My Single Six 32 H&R Magnum has all 6 chambers pin gauged at .313 ".
My Uberti Dalton 45 Colt has all 6 that pin gauged at .452 ".

I still use only copper jackets in my Vaquero and finally got it to hit at point of aim with a 180 GR bullet.
I use primarily 98 GR to 100 GR lead bullets sized to .313 " in my Single Six and now keep 3 " groups at 7 and 10 yards.
I am currently testing 255 GR SWC and LRNHP bullets sized to .452 " in my Uberti and am getting happier every time I shoot it.

So long story short I do agree that uniform chambers and properly sized lead bullets make range day much funner than not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bob, I don't know it by experience with this particular revolver, but virtually every expert I have either read or communicated with has said that tight and inconsistent cylinder throats are simply no bueno for cast bullet shooters. Could be OK with jacketed but all I have at hand for .45 Colt are cast bullets. I am going to slug the bore this morning to see if I can detect any tight spots. Ruger also has a reputation for tightening its revolver barrels enough that it creates a tight spot right where the threads meet the frame. This situation has led to another widely recommended practice -- either fire-lapping the bore or reaming an 11-degree forcing cone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
I don't know why they haven't changed their process. I've read others comments, it's easy to remove metal not so easy to put it back.

I suppose it would be nice if Ruger fixed this but I really don't object as long as they continue to make rugged and reliable revolvers as a reasonable price. Maybe I'm brainwashed but I also see what a custom revolver or a Freedom Arms cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
@Billin TX - there is an e library with a good amount of information about your issues. I've had to ream almost half of my SA Ruger revolvers. Not all were .45 Colt either. I've never worried about the forcing cones on mine but understand it's useful to change the angle if you are shooting primarily lead.

I've also never had an issue with a canted or restricted barrel. Hopefully those issues are mostly fixed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
I don't know why they haven't changed their process. I've read others comments, it's easy to remove metal not so easy to put it back.

I suppose it would be nice if Ruger fixed this but I really don't object as long as they continue to make rugged and reliable revolvers as a reasonable price. Maybe I'm brainwashed but I also see what a custom revolver or a Freedom Arms cost.
I don't think that it so much a 'change in process' as it is a 'replace the reamers' when they get worn change.
Think about how many times you hear people talking about guns that have never been shot. I would not venture to guess the percentage but probably a lot of owners either never shoot their revolvers or do not shoot them enough to know/care that they are not performing as well as they could. Just like putting less money/effort into QC at the added cost to CS, when to replace the chamber reamers is a balance of cost to benefit.

Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
Yes sounds like your throats are too tight but,,,,, there is a plus side.
First off , how did you measure? Calipers are really not the best for this. Pin gages are the way to go.
The plus is when too small you have the ability to open up to whatever you want and have equal holes all around. It's when they are too big the cussin starts.
Yeah, if its 45 and a Ruger chances are firelapping will also be on the menu.
All troublesome stuff for sure but well worth it when the results are in.
Ruger sells a great parts kit but sometimes you just have to finish it yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
I don't know why they haven't changed their process. I've read others comments, it's easy to remove metal not so easy to put it back.

I suppose it would be nice if Ruger fixed this but I really don't object as long as they continue to make rugged and reliable revolvers as a reasonable price. Maybe I'm brainwashed but I also see what a custom revolver or a Freedom Arms cost.
If they’re in spec they’re in spec, we’re talking about production machining tolerances are a fact of life


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
If they’re in spec they’re in spec, we’re talking about production machining tolerances are a fact of life


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes they are. I would hope Ruger has done a cost-benefit analysis (or whatever term is being used today) on this issue. I assume they have.

As FireEscape has mentioned, there's a lot of revolvers that never get shot. I'm sure that factors into the equation somehow.

Again, I'm a Ruger fan and have accepted this as being a part of being a Ruger fan. I think needsmostuff just said it very well....

..............
Ruger sells a great parts kit but sometimes you just have to finish it yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
If they’re in spec they’re in spec, we’re talking about production machining tolerances are a fact of life


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
In spec is in spec, but it’s somewhat disconcerting to buy a gun that costs $750 to $1,000 and then have to spend a couple hundred bucks to get what you should have gotten to begin with. I guess I’m hardheaded, I keep on buying them. :LOL:
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
18,519 Posts
This "tight throat" issue with 45 cal Rugers started with the very first batch made and continue to this day. Yes, Ruger knows about it but has chosen to use very liberal specs rather than to fix the problem. As it turns out, Ruger used a "gang" reamer system that reamed all 6 throats at the same time, with each throat having a unique reamer. As reamers wear, they get smaller so the throat diameters get smaller. Reamers don't wear at the same rate so that's why there can be an inconsistency between throat diameters. I don't know how much Ruger spends on each reamer but it adds a lot to production costs when reamers wear. I ream throats manually .... no motorized process, I found reamers will last for about 100 throats. Reamers can then be sharpened and will last another 100 throats but after that, they have worn too small to be effective.

While I was a gunsmith, I reamed hundreds of Ruger Blackhawks and Super Blackhawks.... mostly 45 cal but some were 44 or 357 cal. It was not unusual to find all six holes at slightly different diameters, not to mention some throats were oval .... a product of a dull reamer. Bore constrictions are also quite common and are normally found where the barrel screws into the frame. This issue comes from the barrel installer taking a shortcut .... torquing the barrel tighter to get the front sight at top dead center, rather than doing it right by dressing the front of the frame slightly. Over torquing the barrel will cause constrictions.

Even with tight throats and constricted bores, Ruger SAs will still shoot safely, although groups may not be worth bragging about. After throat reaming, forcing cone chamfering, and taking care of bore constrictions, most Ruger SAs will perform at match grade standards.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top