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Thought I would share a good example as to why always inspect your brass inside and out. Got some “new” lake city brass for my blackout and was prepping some to load up with 220 grain Sierra prohunters. This case made it through the sizer (I resize all brass, even virgin, but that’s not the point of this) and was tumbling the sizing lube off. When pulling the brass out of a tumbler, I find that a great time to inspect inside and out to make sure all the dry media is out. Well, I found this little guy. I first saw it when I was clearing out the flash hole. I then pulled it out a little bit to illustrate.
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This is a good reminder and a great example of taking the time to insect inside and out. Going to share this at our class. Everyone is now taking the time to learn to reload and "safety first" at each stage is important.
Have a great day!
 

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Good job staying alert. I have seen media that had too much rouge in it clump togather in cases just like that, almost as if the media was too wet. Found thar recently on some 45colts i was reloading. Definately pays to pay attention during reloading.
 
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Yes great catch . Always bring your A game to the table . Good Quality inspection before and after . Thanks Brnwlms for sharing
 

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What is that? At first glance it looked like primer parts. I enlarged the picture and cannot figure what that is. Good advise/reminder about case inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What is that? At first glance it looked like primer parts. I enlarged the picture and cannot figure what that is. Good advise/reminder about case inspection.
It’s just a big, long piece of brass trim. It is all one long continuous piece.


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Brass shavings if my eyes don't deceive me ...
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I think one thing that might make the picture a little deceiving is that there is a kernel or two of green media wrapped up in it.


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Brnwms, This belongs in the Tips section! I am proud too admit that along with you and others I always inspect at least twice and often thrice!
 

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One time at the range, I picked up some 7x57 brass for my Mauser. When I got it home, I decapped the 20 cases and discovered I had hundreds of little tiny spiders crawling on my reloading bench. I found another use for WD-40 .... it kills spiders on contact. Seems there were nests of spiders in several of the cases .... another good reason to inspect them. Some spiders remained in the cases and I caught them trying to do the back stroke in my ultrasonic cleaner. Guess they don't like vinegar either.

Another event .... I bought a bag of 100 new R-P 44 Mag cases at Cabela's. I found three cases in the lot that didn't have a flash hole. I wonder how that would have worked?
 
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Inspection inside and out , before doing anything , is my Rule #1 .
That applies to brand new and especially Once Fired Brass .
You just never know what will come along with the brass or what you will find lurking inside a case . Looking before you load is smart !
Gary
 

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Gary, with no flash hole, I bet if you pressed hard enough the primer would have fixed things (or not)! LOL That hurts just hearing of the error which is a biggie.
 

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I inspect them all cause I get these clumps of brass cleaner liquid and corn cob stuck inside of some casings. I also figured out the hard way not to mix calibers cause the 223 and the 9mm get swallowed up by the bigger calibers.

So what exactly caused that? I'm asking cause I've already royally screwed some things up and just want a heads up.
 

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stoble, When I had my shop, a customer brought in a 38 Special revolver that was locked up. I was able to get the cylinder freed up by running a solid brass rod down the muzzle and tapping what was left of the primer back in the primer pocket. Once the cylinder was swung open, I removed the cartridges. It turned out a factory load had the same problem as my 44 Mag brass above ... no flash hole. The primer went off just fine but the pressure from the flash had no where to go. The primer totally ruptured and locked up the cylinder. After I got everything squared away and cleaned up, there was no apparent damage to the gun. The cartridge went in the trash. This would probably not be a fun thing to happen if you were in the middle of a fire fight!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So what exactly caused that? I'm asking cause I've already royally screwed some things up and just want a heads up.
It’s just the trimming from the trimming process. The big industrial trimmers are a little different than we home reloaders use. This just worked it’s way into the case instead of falling free.


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If I were to list all the strange, unusual... and common, gunk
I've found in cases over the years, it would make up an entire thread by itself. I would include factory ammo that wouldn't chamber for one reason or another as well. Having reloaded over 1 million rounds of ammo (I had a commercial operation a lifetime ago) i have visually inspected every round that left my shop. In general, but certainly not always, a round with gunk in it will over flow with powder when loaded. This is especially true of rifle ammo, perhaps not so much with pistol. Careful inspection of cases before and after loading is a requirement and becomes especially essential if loading anywhere near top end loads! Just a few things I've found stuck in cases: caked dirt, insects, apparent pocket lint, sub caliber bullets, .22 LR cases, other, smaller cases and a few things I was unable to identify at all! This self-imposed inspection requirement has saved my bacon a couple or seven times over the years! You simply cannot be too careful. This even goes for new brass, which I always resize before loading. It is also why I just love the BoreTech brass cleaner... it will make the nastiest looking brass look like new, inside and out!
Cheers,
crkckr
 
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