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Discussion Starter #1
Please I would like some help with this. My ruger redhawk I just traded for has a very small gap between the frame and the triggerguard assembly. (Pics attached) the spring loaded plunger on the frame that locks the trigger group does not fully seat(it however does lock the trigger group in place and as far as I can tell the revolver functions fine. But are there any possible concerns involving either the pawl, transfer bar, or th cylinder stop? I have a feeling with a few minutes and the right tool, I can remove a tiny bit of metal that is stopping it from seating all the way, or should I just leave well enough alone?

I know this is addressed to iowegan, but all opinions would be appreciated, I just figured that this fine gentleman has seen this before.

Thanks jim
Ps trying to attach a darn pic!
 

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ventibrewdude, Sorry I missed your post until today. Although I don't see a photo, I think I know what you mean. Here's what you can do .... remove the trigger guard assembly then remove the trigger/latch spring and plunger by pushing out the small cross pin. Chances are ... when you set the trigger guard assembly back in the frame, the rear of the latch face will be a tad too long. You can remove a few thousandths of the latch face with a file and maintain the same angle. Once the trigger guard assembly fits in the frame with minimal friction, you can then reassemble the latch/trigger spring, plunger, and cross pin. The trigger guard assembly should now fit without a gap and the plunger should snap securely in the corresponding frame hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank you for your reply sir...

Just to be clear am I removing material from the trigger guard or the frame? :) also I hope I didn't mess anything up I called ruger and they said it was ok to tap the trigger guard with a mallet to get it to seat. It looks better, but still small gap? Please tell me it was ok to tap with the mallet! ? Before I tap my head with it!

Also if you don't mind on a seperate note, concerning the same gun. Everything on the revolver check out fine, but after hammer is all way back for sa fire, then I mean to safely lower the hammer I pull the trigger then release, then slowly lower the hammer, during this process occasionally the cylinder latch jumps and unseats from the cylinder cutout? This does not happen all the time just occasionally, and I am guessing it is because of the single spring setjp of the redhawk because my gp100 does not do this? Any thought?

Thanks
Jim
 

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ventibrewdude, Yes, you remove metal from the rear of the trigger guard, not the frame ... it's the area surrounding the latch plunger hole. Once this is fitted properly, you won't need to tap the trigger guard with a mallet ... it will snap in place with modest finger pressure. I'm surprised Ruger told you to use a mallet ... if they do this when assembling guns, it's no wonder they leave the factory with a poor fit. No need to use the mallet on your head ...you didn't hurt the gun ... just a poor way to overcome the very common problem with a tight latch.

Your second issue is probably not a problem at all and it is not related to the single spring design. Here's what can happen ... When the trigger moves fully forward to reset, the trigger plunger moves forward under spring tension (looks like half of an arrowhead). This nudges the cylinder latch and if you are pulling the trigger enough to release the hammer then allowing the trigger to move forward as the hammer is lowered, yes, it could indeed release the cylinder latch from the lock notches. If you pull the trigger fully to the rear like you would do when shooting ... then lower the hammer, the cylinder will remain locked into the latch. This fluke can happen in any Ruger DA ... doesn't hurt a thing and will probably go away when the internal parts get broken in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you Iowegan for your reply's. What you explain makes complete sense during sa/da firing this can't pose any problem, but if you were to start to fire in SA then decided you wanted to lower the hammer safely, pulling the trigger then immediately releasing it, then slowly lowering the hammer, what would happen if the hammer slipped, and the cylinder latched twitched and released? This is a longshot scenario, but just thought i would throw it out to you? Side note-when i traded for the revolver i assumed it had been fired, but after inspection and cleaning it looks to me like only factory rds went through this gun, i have not dry fired it yet, just check timing and lockup. I will probably just write this off as a new gun that needs break in and dry fire it a few hundred time to break it in a little? I know the manual say dry fire OK, but would you recomend snap caps. And yes I will follow your advice and break it in a little and see if that helps!

Thanks again
Jim
 

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ventibrewdude, Sorry, I made it sound like you were doing something wrong. The transfer bar is directly coupled to the trigger so the most safe procedure for lowering the hammer is to hold the hammer spur, pull the trigger enough to release the sear, start easing the hammer down then let go of the trigger. Once the trigger moves forward just a little bit, the transfer bar will drop low enough where the gun won't fire, even if your thumb slips off the hammer. Yes, this could release the cylinder latch but it won't hurt a thing. When the trigger is fully forward, just rock the cylinder a little and it will lock up. If you have fired at least one round then change your mind and decide not to shoot again in SA, the cylinder needs to be re-indexed because there is an unfired round out of sequence. In this scenario, just swing the cylinder open and index the last fired round under the firing pin then swing the cylinder closed.

Snap caps are not needed for dry firing any Ruger revolver. They don't hurt anything but don't protect anything either. Your choice.

Ruger doesn't do a very good job of cleaning up internal parts. It's not unusual to see sharp edges, burrs, and machine marks on internal parts that may cause a gag. Dry firing may help but the best solution is to go through the gun and smooth up all mating surfaces. Not only will this remedy function issues, it will make the action much smoother to operate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again. I am learning a lot thanks to you! When I got back into firearms a couple years ago everything was semi auto handguns. Now thanks to ruger and smith the only handguns I own are revo's they are just so pretty and functional.

Would I follow any of the guides for smoothing up the trigger surfaces for the gp100 for my redhawk? Or is there a specific guide for trigger work on the redhawk? Also do you reccomend a polishing stone or what materials would I need to start the trigger job?

Thanks for all your info

Jim
 

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ventibrewdude, I wouldn't get too excited about a trigger job at this point. A general "fluff and buff" like you would do with a GP-100 should suffice. Although the Redhawk uses a different single spring action, the concept is the same for all revolvers. Strip the gun down and inspect each part. If it has burrs, sharp edges, or machine marks, use a small jeweler's file to dress them smooth. Don't take any metal off the sear notch or the tip of the trigger extension.
 
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