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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wasn't sure where to post this. It's not a Ruger question, but you guys are the only gun people I know.



This Winchester 30-30 casing, and five more like it, came from one box of 20 rounds fired through the gun yesterday. Not in order. I'd put six in, examine the shells and two or three came out distorted like this. This gun had chamber issues when I got it (it was my Dad's, got it back from a relative he gave it to long ago) and I had a Winchester specialist put a new used barrel on it, he test fired it and so did I when I got it back. But this is only the second box I've shot through it and this is happening, but not on every shot. What gives?

My questions, I guess, are:

Why would this happen on some but not all of the rounds?

Is a gun that produces this mis-shapen casing not safe to shoot?

Thanks.
Ed.
 

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Ed,

Are you referring to the dent on the case mouth, because that's the only thing I see with that case. If so, it's a non issue. The case is simply hitting something on the way out or landing there when it hits the ground.
When it's run through the sizing die it will resize fine.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Joe. That's a relief. I emailed the Winchester guy and he said basically the same thing:

quote: That is not from firing it. This happens when the shell is extracted and
is sometimes hit from the bottom when the next round comes up on the carrier
and strikes the empty case and it is not quite out of the chamber. If you
cycle the lever slowly this should not take place. This is nothing to worry
about and is not caused by the firing or the chamber. If the carrier spring
snaps the carrier up before the case is fully extracted and you watch it you
will see what I mean. Also I have seen this when the case flips out and hits
something hard when it falls it will bend the soft brass neck. Try catching
the case before it flips out and see if it stops doing it. Well this is
nothing to worry about so enjoy it and let me know what you find out when
you try these 2 things.
Does that sound about right?
 

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Yep,
That sounds just about right.

Joe
 

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I also have a Marlin/Glenfield 30A in 30-30 Win. The brass for 30-30 Winchester is very soft brass. As stated above, ejection and hitting the ground can cause this. When resizing them, they will reform as normal :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, that's a big relief. This is a special gun with sentimental value, but it's also really fun to shoot (although I'm not very good, see my latest results in the range forum). So I really just want it to be safe and reliable so if I feel like taking it out I can feel comfortable doing that. It seems that I can, so I'm happy.
 

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Isn't the proper way to cycle a levergun quickly and smartly like a pumpgun? In a pump, to cycle slowly invites a jam...somebody larn me somepun....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think what he's saying is that I should test it by cycling slowly, catching the shell and making sure it's not distorted. But that once I realize what he already knows -- that it's not firing the shell that's causing the distortion -- that I can then comfortably shoot and cycle away. It doesn't need to cycle slowly to function properly, just to prove that there's nothing wrong with how the gun is shooting. At least that's what I gathered from that.

But on a bit of a tangent, my neighbor has a lever action Marlin that shoots .357s, less than a year old and he's selling it for $200. Sounds like a nice deal.
 

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The Marlin .357 for $200, if in good shape is a steel.

The proper way to cycle the action on a Winchester 94 is to swing the lever down and back in one continuous movement. Don't stop, don't hesitate, don't back up the lever in mid stroke. Just down and back in a positive movement.
Works good on Marlins too.

Joe
 

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quote:Originally posted by EddieF

But on a bit of a tangent, my neighbor has a lever action Marlin that shoots .357s, less than a year old and he's selling it for $200. Sounds like a nice deal.
Well, let's just say if he lived closer to me I'd be asking you for his contact info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
While we're on the topic, and again I haven't looked into it, it just came up today during an afternoon of lawn mowing and beer drinking, but I thought the whole lever action 30-30 thing was dependant on the flat-tipped bullets so you can load them up against eachother. How can you take regular .357 or .38 rounds and feed them in on top of eachother like you can those 30-30s?

The one thing I did not like about that Marlin was the front sight. But I imagine that's very easily rectified...
 

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That ol' expander ball on the sizing die will pop that dent out mucho pronto-- no problemo!!:D
 

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EddieF, that .357 holds 9+ 1 in the barrel and is a handy house or truck defense gun-gets 2-300 feet per second increase on some ammo because of the barrel length, and if you can get it for 200, that's about half price...blue or stainless? The ammo is fine, just don't use pointed metal piercing ammo-the whole idea is the pointed 30-30 and like ammo would have the point on the primer ahead of it and when the shot was fired, KABOOM because of recoil...I sure wish MY neighbor had the .357 Marlin for $200_I'd be a-mowin' his yard all year!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah I like the size of that Marlin. It's blued. I'm not crazy about the checkerboard wood, but can live with it. I will borrow it and take it to the range this Friday, maybe I'll snap a picture of it and post it here. Seems to be like new, but I only looked at it briefly.
 

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As the Sheepdog said, the reason for the flat nose is so the pointy end of a bullet doesn't rest against the primer of the next round and cause an accidential discharge in the magazine. That makes a mess of the gun.
Any SWC, HP or even round nose lead is fine in the magazine.
As for price, you could buy for 200 and if you don't like it, easily make your money back in a resell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So for the .357 Marlin, anything that's not pointy is okay, it doesn't have to be flat AND have lead at the end like my 30-30 rounds?
 

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I had a lever action .44 mag marlin once. I cycled everything .44 through it and never paid any attention to the type of ammo being fired in it, and I never had an issue with it.
 

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Works the same as the 30-30, and same reason. There is just more pointy 30 cal that could cause problems. MOST handgun bullets are of the design not to cause problems. If in doubt, hold the bullet in question up to the base of another cartridge and see if the nose of the bullet rests directly against the primer and not the cartridge base. Also, if reloading make sure the primers are seated properly below the case surface and not protruding above. It always pays to play it safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Jimbo, that's the reply that I should have come up with on my own, that more of the 30 cal ammo is pointed like that. It all makes sense now.

And you guys have definitely talked me into buying that Marlin!
 

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Ain't no pointy .44 loads, Keith...just big ole fat ones that reach out and slap ya...I wonder if these cheap .38 fmc roundnoses could be hard enough to ignite a primer---I think I'd limit myself to lead tipped in any tubular feed...just to protect my fine rifle!!!
 
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