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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always wanted a Bearcat but it's not been a high priority. Well, I picked one up on a whim yesterday. Only problem is that it looks as new in the box and sn dates it to 1961. I want a shooter, not a collector. What say you guys in the know. Is this worth more than a new one that I wouldn't feel bad about shooting? Should I just shoot it? It it's kinda unique compared to a new one, alloy frame and all. Resell it and buy a new one?

Thanks,
Bryan

Ps, also bought a sweet Blackhawk Bisley 45 ss 5.5". Can't wait to shoot it.
 

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Hard core collectors want new in the box, unfired specimens and a box to match and, if possible, some background on the gun that verifies that gun wasn't used. Those guns, of course, bring a premium price.

Anything that's been used and fired is of less interest. While that's a fine older specimen, it does appear to have seen at least a little use and the box is less than pristine, nor is the gun a first year production gun or rare variant.

As to value, it's at least as valuable as what you would pay for a new version and possibly a bit more, but I can't see that shooting it, at this point, would seriously reduce the value. For darn sure, if it was my gun, I'd be shooting it and enjoying it.

Your gun, so your call, though.
 

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Never own a gun I can't or won't shoot . I would shoot & enjoy it .
But that's just me .
 

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How I solved the problem . . .



. . . the top two are my "safe queens", the bottom one my shooter.
 

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1) You'll make a few collectors pretend to be sad if you shoot it. You'll be knocking off one of the last remaining NIB, unfired Bearcats left to be had. For any collector, the search is the pleasure, not the collection, so as you knock one off, it makes their search all the more satisfying.

2) You'll actually be making a lot of collectors very happy, because you'll be knocking off some of the competition and making THEIR revolvers just that much more collectible...

You bought it to shoot it, so shoot it. If you bought it for a reasonable shooter price, not a crazy collector price, then shoot it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The box is less than pristine as you say. The gun has a slight amount of handling wear but I don't see anything that would indicate to me that it has been shot. Unfortunately I know nothing about it's history. What tell tail signs would I look for?

Thanks,
Bryan
 

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Brian you have a beautiful Ruger Bearcat there I'm just guessing you paid close or over what a new one would cost. The older Ruger Bearcats to command some fairly good values out there. If that gun was mine as nice as it is and the box also appears to be good condition as well. I would shoot this gun and enjoy it and take care of it so in another 20 years it looks as good as it does right now!!! With proper use and care this Ruger will last the rest of your lifetime and BTW my personal favorite Ruger that I own is my Ruger Vaquero Bisley .357 Stainless Steel 5.5 inch barrel. Note I didn't say New Model because mine is the old large frame model and it is such a smooth revolver. You chose well with your two Rugers now go out and shoot them both and start to really enjoy them!!!:D;)
 

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If it were mine I would shoot it. If I own 'em, I shoot 'em. I hve knocked that big time collector value off of some of mine in the past, but I buy them to enjoy them, not for some collector to clamor over when I'm gone. When I die, my son can have them all and he won't have to worry about shooting and enjoying them, because they've already been broke in. Just my take on it.
 

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I'm not totally familiar with those revolvers, but I thought the single actions made by Ruger in the '60's were all 3 screws, the Bearcat included. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Have fun with it. That things been sittin around NOT having any fun since 1961. Bout time someone enjoyed it. Its a production manufactured .22 pistol, not a Stradivarious. Probably misspelled ...... Incidentally, THOSE get used........
 

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When I was a kid I always wanted one. My dad picked up a Single Six and it was the first handgun I shot when I was 6. Still always sorted of wanted a Bearcat. When Ruger re introduced them I ordered a SS one. While I was waiting for it a collector had some NIB old ones at a gun show so I picked one of those up also. I do shoot mine but it only cost $290 when I bought it. Now that I am grown up they seem sort of dinky in my hand.

 

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I'm not totally familiar with those revolvers, but I thought the single actions made by Ruger in the '60's were all 3 screws, the Bearcat included. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Nope, the Bearcats were (are) "two screws".
 

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Are you a shooter or a collector? If you're a shooter, then shoot it.

I really doubt you will be lying on your death bed someday, thinking, "Boy, I'm sure glad I never shot my Ruger Bearcat." :rolleyes:

You already say you paid less than a brand new one, and I'd imagine your old model is probably at least as good, quality-wise, as a brand new one. That would answer the question for me right there.

Also if you shoot it maybe you'll find out why the prior owner sold it. Maybe it's got a problem needing some work. Maybe it's terribly inaccurate. Hard to say if you don't shoot it.
 

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Great point - My Strad got played!!!!!!
Well there ya have it, OP, if a Ruger owner/shooter plays HIS Strad, and suggests you shoot YOUR Ruger, then it would seem you have some sound advise to consider. Go shoot it and have some fun, and wipe it down when your done. It will still look nice, I promise ...
 
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