Ruger Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a new weapon and am having some issues. The weapon is not cycling (brass not ejecting and not loading the next round from the magazine). I followed the forums aof what it could be and so far have remedied the bolt release function (filed down the barb), disassembled and cleaned properly, took all the screws out from the rail mount and inspected all areas for any types of abrasion or friction.

I have come to realize that the bolt is not fully traveling all the way back (goes halfway). Upon inspection, the bolt is hitting the hammer and stopping. It's backward progression is not complete. It seems the hammer is pretty stiff, not allow the bolt to complete it's cycle.

What can I do? Any favorable advice is appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
1. Welcome to the forum! Try posting an introduction in the new members subsection.

2. Please don't refer to your 10/22 as a weapon. It's a rimfire rifle. It is only a weapon if used as such.

3. Sounds like the hammer spring/strut is binding. A trip back to Ruger may be in order or a visit to a local gunsmith.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. Thank you, i will consider.
2. Something i was taught.
3. What do you mean binding? Does it need to be replaced? Or can i buy aftermarket and replace myself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
What type of ammunition are you feeding it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,724 Posts
If you can't manually cycle the bolt, then a trip back to Ruger is in order. Their customer service is first rate. You mentioned that you filed something down on the bolt release. Could that have something to do with it?

If the bolt cycles smoothly by hand, I would suspect faulty ammo. There has been a lot of crap ammo sold in the last couple of years.

Welcome to the forum, by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you can't manually cycle the bolt, then a trip back to Ruger is in order. Their customer service is first rate. You mentioned that you filed something down on the bolt release. Could that have something to do with it?

If the bolt cycles smoothly by hand, I would suspect faulty ammo. There has been a lot of crap ammo sold in the last couple of years.

Welcome to the forum, by the way.
The part I filed actually helped the bolt release work smoother. I used to have a hard time releasing the bolt, but it's working just fine now.

Pulling the bolt halfway, the action is smooth. After which, it requires just a little more force. I'm using CCI mini mags.

Thank you, glad to be here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,724 Posts
Well, then, it's not the ammo. Minimags are pretty much the gold standard these days. I have heard of overspray getting into the bolt raceway and causing problems. I would suggest calling Ruger and giving them a chance to fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
There are a couple of other possible diagnoses. It's always awkward to try to diagnose and cure a malfunction over the internet without seeing what is happening. Sorry for all the questions, but:

1. Does this happen all the time, or is it intermittent? A failure to cock the hammer would likely occur on every shot. If it's only intermittent, the problem is likely to be elsewhere.

2.. What magazine are you using? If a 25-round, are you holding the magazine with your support hand? (You should not.)

3. How do you know the bolt isn't going all the way back? If the bolt is hitting the hammer and stopping, you should not be able to fire another shot after clearing the ejected case. Try this test: On the next malfunction, drop the magazine and try to remove the stuck case without pulling the bolt back more than absolutely needed to free the case. Then allow the bolt to close. If the hammer failed to cock, nothing will happen when you squeeze the trigger. If the hammer did cock properly, you will get a click as it dry-fires. (Note that dry-firing a 10/22 is perfectly harmless.) It is important not to pull the bolt back too far when doing this test as that will cock the hammer.

4. A frequent cause of failures to eject among new owners is not holding the rifle firmly. If the rifle is allowed to move backwards under recoil even a little, the fired case is hit by the barrel before it can be thrown clear out the ejection port.

5. Back to #2: If the hammer is not cocking, you will need to remove the hammer and check the strut. If the strut is sitting too high in the hammer, that will cause it to bind. If there is a burr on the strut, that could also cause binding. Polishing the end of the strut and putting a little dab of grease in the slot in the rear of the hammer (where the strut rides) can help.

If none of these is it, please give us a little more description of what is happening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are a couple of other possible diagnoses. It's always awkward to try to diagnose and cure a malfunction over the internet without seeing what is happening. Sorry for all the questions, but:

1. Does this happen all the time, or is it intermittent? A failure to cock the hammer would likely occur on every shot. If it's only intermittent, the problem is likely to be elsewhere.

2.. What magazine are you using? If a 25-round, are you holding the magazine with your support hand? (You should not.)

3. How do you know the bolt isn't going all the way back? If the bolt is hitting the hammer and stopping, you should not be able to fire another shot after clearing the ejected case. Try this test: On the next malfunction, drop the magazine and try to remove the stuck case without pulling the bolt back more than absolutely needed to free the case. Then allow the bolt to close. If the hammer failed to cock, nothing will happen when you squeeze the trigger. If the hammer did cock properly, you will get a click as it dry-fires. (Note that dry-firing a 10/22 is perfectly harmless.) It is important not to pull the bolt back too far when doing this test as that will cock the hammer.

4. A frequent cause of failures to eject among new owners is not holding the rifle firmly. If the rifle is allowed to move backwards under recoil even a little, the fired case is hit by the barrel before it can be thrown clear out the ejection port.

5. Back to #2: If the hammer is not cocking, you will need to remove the hammer and check the strut. If the strut is sitting too high in the hammer, that will cause it to bind. If there is a burr on the strut, that could also cause binding. Polishing the end of the strut and putting a little dab of grease in the slot in the rear of the hammer (where the strut rides) can help.

If none of these is it, please give us a little more description of what is happening.
1. It's been happening since day one, I just figured it was a process of breaking in. It does this with every shot.

2. Using the 10rd mag that came with the rifle. Stock. Plastic.

3. I took apart the weapon, seated the trigger assembly normally and watched as I pulled the bolt back and noticed the rear of the bolt would initiate contact with the trigger and that would be the exact time the bolt would become harder to pull back. With a little more effort it would ride over the trigger and re-cock the trigger. I can only pull the bolt back approx. 1/2 way. It will not eject the spent round nor re-cock the trigger.

4. I have the rifle seated firmly into my shoulder when I fire.

5. I'll try that. There's nothing more of a description I can give other than what I had already described. If I could take video and upload, I would.

Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Thanks. If it's happening on every shot, that points to a mechanical malfunction. Has the rifle been doing this from new, or did it begin after you had it apart once?

This seems a bit contradictory:

I took apart the weapon, seated the trigger assembly normally and watched as I pulled the bolt back and noticed the rear of the bolt would initiate contact with the trigger and that would be the exact time the bolt would become harder to pull back. With a little more effort it would ride over the trigger and re-cock the trigger. I can only pull the bolt back approx. 1/2 way. It will not eject the spent round nor re-cock the trigger.
First, the bolt contacts the hammer, not the trigger. Second, if you can pull the bolt back all the way manually with a little more effort, why then say you can only pull it back half-way?

When you open the bolt manually, do you feel or hear anything odd? Is anything rubbing or catching? If it's really that hard to pull the bolt back to cock the hammer, something other than mere hammer spring pressure is blocking it.

This may not be what you have, but I have a friend who had similar problems. His ejector was out of place when he installed the trigger group after cleaning - it was actually rotated back and stuck against the right-side wall of the trigger group housing. The bolt ran into it preventing proper cycling. Similarly, is your bolt lock spring (the one with two legs that sits on the right-side hammer bushing) properly installed? If the upper leg of that spring isn't captured by the ejector pin, it would block the bolt.

At the risk of sounding like Microsoft tech support, I recommend you fully disassemble your trigger group, ensure it is working smoothly out of the rifle, and then re-assemble the rifle carefully, ensuring that the ejector and bolt guide rod are where they ought to be. Then work the bolt manually to see if the action has improved.

The anti-gun idiots love when you call a rifle a "weapon". It feeds their propaganda machine. Don't feed the trolls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
50 Cal.
First, welcome to the madness of Ruger Fever.
Drop the trigger group out of the rifle, pull the hammer back with your thumb, hold you hand to stop the hammer from going to far forward when you pull the trigger. Pay attention to how smooth thee trigger is and listen for any grating noises as it is pulled, re-cock the hammer and repeat. Do this several times. If you detect roughness or hear scraping sounds, call Ruger CSR. If this all checks out OK, look into the receiver with the bolt all the way forward, look specifically at the end to the charging rod. It can rest on the edge of the seat area and the bolt will drag, starting about half way bock in its cycle and the hammer and trigger will not reset. f this is the problem, you should not bee able to pull the bolt far enough to the rear, the rifle should not load, again contact Ruger CSR. If this looks OK, then cycle the bolt, if it is not smooth, call Ruger CSR.
Good luck finding the issue but it should a simple fix for Ruger to take care of.
Slugger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Hello and welcome OP...seems like your on your way to getting help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
The gentlemen who posted hammer spring/strut I believe is on the right track. Has had it happen to me. Remove the spring and strut easy to do and carefully reinstall. The upper end of the strut goes into a circular slot and check the spring is installed correctly and retry. If no go try reassembly again til its right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just recently bought a used 10/22 that had a few upgrades and the price was right.

Took the rifle over to a buddy's house just after.

Found that occasionally, the bolt would hang up and not go back further than about 1/2 way or so.

Got home, got it apart and essentially, the problem turned out to be the ejector being in the wrong spot. It was on the opposite side of the hammer and facing backwards.

Make sure that it appears like in the picture.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I never imagined so many owners would allow the ejector to move out of its proper place while installing the trigger group into the receiver.

Here's a simple fix: put a thin strip of electrical tape on the side of the ejector - just enough to thicken it in the slot. It will then stay in place due to friction and never cause you problems again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I never imagined so many owners would allow the ejector to move out of its proper place while installing the trigger group into the receiver.

Here's a simple fix: put a thin strip of electrical tape on the side of the ejector - just enough to thicken it in the slot. It will then stay in place due to friction and never cause you problems again.
Good tip. I don't have a problem since I learned to check the ejector position before installing the trigger group and to ensure I could see the ejector after the installation.:D
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top