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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had a guy come in last night with a nasty injury to his right eye. Once I got the blood washed out of the eye and got the eyelids opened, I could see that the cornea was intact, but that there was blood behind it. Time to call the ophthalmologist! While we were waiting for her to come in from home, I asked how the injury had occurred.

The problem started with a balky AR-15; it was "short-cycling" (his words) and not picking up a new round from the magazine. So, he "opened it up" and field stripped the bolt. Finding nothing obviously wrong, he decided to get a closer look at the buffer spring. He pressed down the buffer retainer, but it was stiff and he couldn't depress it enough to release the buffer. He bent a piece of heavy steel wire and used that to push down the retainer; it worked, but now the buffer was jammed by the wire.

Frustrated by all this, the man yanked on the wire, pulling it free. The buffer, no longer jammed by the wire, came rocketing out. Somehow, in all the struggling and swearing, the man's eye was in line with the trajectory of the buffer (and spring) and he was smacked hard right in the eye.

Now, I've seen a few guys (and one "gal") hit in the eye with a 1911 recoil spring and cap, but this was my first case of eye injury from an AR-15 buffer. This is why I always wear eye protection I'm working on my guns.


Jim
 

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Good advice! Thanks for posting. I, (we), really enjoy all of your posts from the ER! Keep 'em coming.
 

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I have always heard the phrase "Keep your eye on those things", but I have always worn eye protection when flying things or dangerous chemicals are involved. I saw someone lose their sight in one eye from something similar to this. And chemical burns to the face are not something I want to experience either.

Thanks again for these type posts, Jim. It is much easier to learn from the mistakes of others.
 

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I have always heard the phrase "Keep your eye on those things", but I have always worn eye protection when flying things or dangerous chemicals are involved. I saw someone lose their sight in one eye from something similar to this. And chemical burns to the face are not something I want to experience either.

Thanks again for these type posts, Jim. It is much easier to learn from the mistakes of others.
And safer too. Thanks.
 

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Learned the hard way. Back in 84 cleaning my 1911. A full length guide rod plug slipped out of the bushing wrench and got me in the corner of my left eye. No permanent damage,
but a lesson learned the hard way. My wife at the time called me a idiot all the way to the ER.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Did you slap him upside his head and say "dumb azz":rolleyes:
No need. This was what we used to call a "self-critiquing mistake" in the Army; his own pain was telling him he'd screwed up.


Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
more good advice is sometimes we get there faster if we slow down. the key is get "there", not the emergency room.
"Make haste slowly" was how my Grandfather used to put it. Almost any task will take longer if it is interrupted by a trip to the Emergency Room.


Jim
 

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:rolleyes: You don't think things like that will happen to you ... and BONGING - there it is. Thanks for the heads-up
 

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Hmmmmmm.......is there a Doctor in the house?
 

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I always use some kind of eye protection. I'm old and use cheaters to read anyhow. Dr says that's all I need. But...I'm finding out old people are clumsy.
My zero turn mower likes to bounce unknowns off of trees, cars and houses that somehow hit me all over my body and head. I don't always hit my thumb with a hammer anymore. I've been known to lose my temper and throw things.
Not a good idea, sometimes it bounces too.:mad:
 

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Guns don't kill people! Fully loaded buffer springs do!
 

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Great advice about using eye protection. While I never did in the past, when I had a 1911 recoil spring & cap get away from me and put a clean hole in the plastic drop ceiling light lens and ricochet around in the drop ceiling, I now wear my reloading glasses when cleaning anything with a spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Great advice about using eye protection. While I never did in the past, when I had a 1911 recoil spring & cap get away from me and put a clean hole in the plastic drop ceiling light lens and ricochet around in the drop ceiling, I now wear my reloading glasses when cleaning anything with a spring.

I've had a number of people tell me - in all seriousness - that their eyelids will close fast enough to protect their eyes. There's even some truth to that, but this guy's injury happened through his eyelid. I could tell that because there was a perfect semi-circular cut on the skin of his eyelid, exactly the size and shape of a buffer.


Jim
 

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Great advice about using eye protection. While I never did in the past, when I had a 1911 recoil spring & cap get away from me and put a clean hole in the plastic drop ceiling light lens and ricochet around in the drop ceiling, I now wear my reloading glasses when cleaning anything with a spring.
I've had a number of people tell me - in all seriousness - that their eyelids will close fast enough to protect their eyes. There's even some truth to that, but this guy's injury happened through his eyelid. I could tell that because there was a perfect semi-circular cut on the skin of his eyelid, exactly the size and shape of a buffer.


Jim
I'm thinking, if the recoil spring & cap put what looked like a bullet hole through multi-millimeter thick plastic, my eyelid ain't going to stand a chance! ;)
 

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In GONRA's experience, one has to wear GOGGLES to have complete eye protection.
Sharp, brittle TWIGS on tree branches are the worst. They just POKE INTO YER EYE if you do NOT have goggles! [email protected]#$%^&

Goggles will easily deal wth errant Firearms Springs.
 

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As far as the eyelid closing first, yes, it might, but I can tell you from experience that enough force applied will STILL rupture your eye! (13 stitches in the eyeball itself!)
 
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