Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hi all, so since i started shooting in june, i've been slowly accumulating a little stockpile. all i have right now are two 10/22s, a 9mm, and a 12ga, so obviously those are the only flavors of ammo i have. until this week i hadn't been labeling the plastic ammo boxes. didn't really feel the need-- figured i'd use it up before i'd need to think about the age of it, but now that i've amassed a fair amount of it, i've started just labeling the date i i bought it and boxed it. does anyone/everyone else do this? if so, how long to you keep stuff stored before feeling you need to use it up? i live in the desert, so humidity isn't a concern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
I have gotten into the habit of marking each box of ammo with the purchase month/year. I am sure it is not necessary, but I now use the oldest first. I store most of my ammo in the basement and when I bring up a new box to put in the garage for use, I mark the "date opened" on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I think you guys have got a little "OCD" goin' on & you need to stop it. LOL
Keep it in a cool spot or as best you can, modern ammo doesn't have a shelf life. :D

Although, I'd bet $$ to donuts that someone will disagree, because that's what they do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
As I accumulated reloaded ammunition, labeling was the only way to identify different loads using the same brass and bullet style.

I also want to keep track of the date they were reloaded. If I have several hundred rounds of a particular load, I prefer to shoot the oldest reloads first.

As for how long reloaded ammunition will last? There are variables. The quality of the reloads, humidity, temperature and packaging.

I live on the southern Idaho desert and like Nevada it's an arid place with very low humidity. So I'm not overly concerned about the effect humidity may have on my reloads.

I believe that temperature fluctuations can have an effect on ammunition. So I store my reloads indoors in a location where fluctuations of temperature is minimal.

There are a lot of methods of storing ammo, most are good, so its really a matter of choice as to what works best for you.

I use ziploc bags and 50 cal. cans to store ammo. I also reload for a dozen calibers. Which quickly led to labeling the 50 cal. cans. This is my method and is by no means the last word or best way to store reloads, it is simply what works for me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
do certain calibers hold up more than others? i'm betting that 22 may be dicier than 9mm after X number of years, for instance.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
181 Posts
I honestly don't bother. It's not that I think that there's anything wrong with doing so, but outside of a warehouse supply of all sorts of different calibers of ammo and typesfor each , my personal supply is pretty straight forward, gone through often enough because of this and kept in proper storage conditions either way so even if I did go for quite some time without using any it would still be good to go. Ammo shelf life can outlast a human's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,546 Posts
Except for .22 rimfire, I reload all I shoot. The label below is indicative of what is marked on each box.



This tells me how many times the cases or hulls have been fired, what was in them, and even where I got them. The record number references a particular load in the label-making database.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
I think you guys have got a little "OCD" goin' on & you need to stop it. LOL
Keep it in a cool spot or as best you can, modern ammo doesn't have a shelf life. :D

Although, I'd bet $$ to donuts that someone will disagree, because that's what they do.
You are right about that ;)

I mark my ammo boxes mostly just to see how fast I am using it. I agree about the shelf life. Most all of us older guys have a shorter shelf life than our ammo!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
I started this practice when I was shooting cowboy in SASS. Rifle and revolver rounds were the same for me, black powder 45LC and each shoot burned up 120 rounds, not counting around a box + of shotshells. I even found that the Midway bullet boxes held exactly 40 rounds of 45LC if you stacked them in like a box of 22lr's. 40 rounds was exactly two stages at the cowboy shoots. So I'd load them, box them, and then put a sticker on them with a date.

I had bought a simple sticker making program that I inputed all of the load data on one sticker. The other sticker had just the number of rounds and caliber with two large slash lines to put the numbers in between to make the date. Worked like a champ and allowed me to rotate my stock consistently. I now am down to three calibers. 44 Magnum, 357 and 38, but I'm only shooting 38's, and 22 magnum. The 44 and the 22 each are for one gun only in each caliber. The balance of my guns are all either 357 or 38, with two being 38 special. So rather than confuse the lot I've chosen to only stock and shoot 38 special. (Cheaper to buy that way as well).

My wife is still a little shaky around firearms and I didn't want her to have an ammo issue with her 38 Lady Smith. She doesn't grab the small ones, nor the big ones, just the medium ones and she's in business. Smithy.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,407 Posts
I have about 20k rounds of .22LR, stored in 50 cal GI cans. Most was bought in the "rush" around the last election and two years after. I "rotated my stock" and numbered my cans. I have 500 rounds of .38, all bought in the same month, so doesn't matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
I started with just the year long ago, then I went to month and year, now it's date, month, and year.

I use the oldest ammo first, usually. If it's $$$ hollow points they stay put until I rotate my carry ammo out at the range 2X a year.
 

·
Ausmerican.
Joined
·
42,767 Posts
I keep track of my brass (as in how many reloads and brass origin).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I keep track of how many times I've reloaded the brass casings just to see how much reloading can be done with the different calibers and types (straight wall, bottleneck, etc.). As far as labeling ammo, I've never done it and probably never will. A little too OCD for me. I am still shooting .22s in a Colt Woodsman that were loaded in the magazine before 1960 and ............. they all still fire and .................. believe it or not, the original mag. spring still functions just fine, no issues. My own personal belief (been shooting at least 50 yrs.) is that if your ammo isn't submerged or left outside, it will still be working OK when we are all worm food!

Edit to add: Nothing wrong with dating ammo and nothing wrong with shooting the oldest first. Another question might be, how long did the ammo sit in a warehouse, etc. before it got to the retailer? Maybe years, maybe days??? Just things to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
I just bought some .50 cal ammo cans and decided to repaint and label them. The stencils were drawn off and cut out by me. The snake was free handed. They have a little overspray around the letters and are not perfect, but turned out how I wanted them to. They kind of have that Army look to them. (except for the 7.62 Soviet can :eek:) :) *Disclaimer - They actually look better than the crappy pictures are portraying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
In 1967 when I was in the Marines we shot .45acp that was labeled 1944. also ate C-Rats that were marker 1955. The ammo worked and nobody died from the food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I was in to 22LR target shooting back in the early '70s and stopped when the law men kicked us off our shooting land. Still had a few hundred rounds from then when I recently picked up a Browning Challenger and decided to see if they would still work. Every one shot just fine even though I stored them all these years in my basement. Everything I read on storing ammo is that it will last a very long time in just about any environment. I'm sure the Army doesn't date all their ammo either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,504 Posts
Most all of us older guys have a shorter shelf life than our ammo!!
That's exactly what I've been thinking. Any ammo I don't use will still fire reliably for someone else long after I'm gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,607 Posts
I think you guys have got a little "OCD" goin' on & you need to stop it. LOL
Keep it in a cool spot or as best you can, modern ammo doesn't have a shelf life. :D

Although, I'd bet $$ to donuts that someone will disagree, because that's what they do.
Actually, when it comes to ammo, especially reloads, I'm CDO. That's like OCD, except that the letters are in alphabetical order, like they should be.:rolleyes:
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top