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I was shooting my wife's LC9s this weekend and had an issue I'm not too familiar with. Hopefully someone here can help.

The casing being extracted would run into the round being chambered. I should have taken a picture, but imagine something that looks a little like a double feed, with both rounds jammed together tightly, except the round on top is the spent casing going out and the bottom is the new round going in.

This happened 4 or 5 times, with two different magazines over 80 rounds. Clearing it wasn't too hard: drop the mag and wrestle with the slide until the jam broke free. But I hate the idea that my wife has to deal with this, and I'd hate to be the one who had to figure it out under stress.

I'm sure I'm not the first to come across this, I'm just not sure what it's called or what's causing it. Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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Greetings from Ohio and welcome to the forum. With the LC9s and EC9s the grip is important like all firearms. Practice with firm grip to avoid limp wrist issues. If you determine your issue persists with proper grip and hold call Ruger customer service they are good. The search on this forum is a good one and others have covered your issue(s) here. Good luck to you and practice/practice/practice. Others here are more knowing than I and they may chime in.
I used this ammo to test all ours.
Blazer Brass CCI 9mm 115gr. 1125fps FMJ
Blazer Brass CCI 9mm 124gr. 1090fps FMJ
American Eagle 9mm 124gr. fps 1150 FMJ
American Eagle 9mm 115gr. fps 1180 FMJ
Also bought a Hogues Handall Beefertail Grip Sleeve for the LC9/EC9s and it helped.
 

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Yup, limp wristing.

Small semi-auto handguns need a firm grip and locked wrist/elbow so that the resultant recoil is being fully used to eject the spent cartridge rather than getting absorbed by the shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you, that is interesting. My entire career has been with large service pistols, so that's an interesting comparison.

You mentioned a lot of ammo. Could under powered ammo contribute to the problem? I brought cheap 9mm because I don't shoot that round normally. I though it could be a mechanical issue, but I never thought about my grip or the bullets.

I need to get her to the range and see if this happens to her. If this happens with smal pistols, maybe she'd be better off with a revolver. (Never been a big fan, but my friends who swear by them always talk about reliability. )
 

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When I began reloading for my LC9sPro, I tried every possible range of loads, including the considerably-below-powered ones. That is, using the Lyman handgun reloading book, I looked up a standard load, loaded to the minimum "starting load" specs, about five rounds per bullet weight. Then I loaded another five at about 10% lower powder weight than the "min.", then another five at about ANOTHER 10% lower than that. All the loads fired and the bullets exited the barrel, but the ones which were about 20% lower than recommended (and quite below factory specs) failed to always operate the slide. Thus I came to the conclusion that the Ruger was quite reliable with even slightly low-powered loads, but not severely lower-powered loads. This "experiment", along with the experiences of others who seldom shoot lightweight semi-autos, lead me to look at limp-wristing as the go-to cause of their problems.
 

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Kwm-> When I joined last year someone here recommended that I just go and practice with the firearm. I did and really ended up enjoying the little Ruger 9mm quite a bit. Now I want a burnt bronze LC9s that I seen here recently. I did add a Hogues Handall Beefertail Grip Sleeve for the LC9/EC9s and it helped. If you still feel you have issues contact Ruger. Others here have more knowledge than I and can assist if it is not the grip. Find out now what the issue is and get some assistance. There are many firearms on the market today that can fill your needs. Good luck and be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
rickclark28, thanks again for your help and for the recommendation. I'll try some of those tips and see if they help.
 

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Thank you, that is interesting. My entire career has been with large service pistols, so that's an interesting comparison.

You mentioned a lot of ammo. Could under powered ammo contribute to the problem? I brought cheap 9 mm because I don't shoot that round normally. I though it could be a mechanical issue, but I never thought about my grip or the bullets.

I need to get her to the range and see if this happens to her. If this happens with small pistols, maybe she'd be better off with a revolver. (Never been a big fan, but my friends who swear by them always talk about reliability. )
It's purely a matter of physics, the mass of the larger pistols (especially the all metal ones) helps with the recoil so the user doesn't loosen up to minimize the recoil. A semiauto pistol need a certain amount of rearward directed energy to cycle properly

The new trend toward compact, sub compact and now micro pistols AND the use of light weight polymers to make CCW arms lighter to carry all day which has exacerbated a grip/ issue.

If you go back thru the treads, countless times, the person having the problem says they have been shooting revolvers and/or 1911, etc pistols for 30+ years so they can't be the issue. Revolvers don't autoload vie recoil and 1911, etc are all metal and heavy and typically don't have the issue.

It doesn't take a lot of practice to get use to get reliable cycling on the micro pistols once a person understands what's going on.

And limp wristing isn't always the issue. There are occasional mechanical issues, but the limp wristing is the easiest to fix.
 
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