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My LCR .22 has been back to CS twice. The second time they replaced the cylinder/crane assembly. It sprays lead back on the cylinder, collecting on the rear of the flutes (and on my hands) as well as the top strap, top of the crane, etc. For those that haven't seen this photo, I'll post it again.

The cylinder gap is .014".....far more than normal of ~.005"
and is likely the reason for the lead spray.

My question is; can the cylinder gap be adjusted in the field? I've read that this gap is adjusted by screwing the barrel in or out, but can't imagine what kind of tool could be used to turn the barrel. Ideas? I really don't want to send it back to CS again, if I can help it.

The picture shows what it looks like after ~150 rounds of Federal bulk copper clads.
 

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The barrel and frame are machined with tight tolerances, so that when the barrel is screwed in fully Ruger gets a good gap without any hand fitting. I believe your problem is with poor cylinder fit on the crane, like the one I returned.

I had a good gap with the cylinder full forward, but too much play let it slide back too far. Yours is apparently not fit far enough forward, even though that's the parts they replaced.

I know you hate the thought of waiting yet again, but I would send them the description and photos. They should want it back.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The barrel and frame are machined with tight tolerances, so that when the barrel is screwed in fully Ruger gets a good gap without any hand fitting. I believe your problem is with poor cylinder fit on the crane, like the one I returned.

I had a good gap with the cylinder full forward, but too much play let it slide back too far. Yours is apparently not fit far enough forward, even though that's the parts they replaced.

I know you hate the thought of waiting yet again, but I would send them the description and photos. They should want it back.
I've done that (with picture). Probably won't get a reply until Monday. Makes one wonder why, after replacing the cylinder/crane assembly, they wouldn't check the cylinder gap. Especially since it was sent back to them the second time with lead all over the cylinder. At the time, I thought the finish was coming off, but they should have known it was lead and not missing finish. I only discovered it accidently when I scraped a spot with my fingernail after I got it back and tested it.

In a American Rifleman article on the LCR, they state that the gap is adjusted by screwing the barrel in or out to get proper gap. That was with the .38 or .357, however. The .22 may be different (or maybe the article was wrong).
 

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My info was from the Guns and Ammo review, where Dick Metcalf was at the Ruger factory and even talked with the LCR designer.

I noticed the last LCR-22 return posted on RF had less than two weeks turnaround. Hopefully Ruger will do as well or better on yours, especially since it's the second trip home for it. You'll likely get yet another box, lock and rug, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My info was from the Guns and Ammo review, where Dick Metcalf was at the Ruger factory and even talked with the LCR designer.

I noticed the last LCR-22 return posted on RF had less than two weeks turnaround. Hopefully Ruger will do as well or better on yours, especially since it's the second trip home for it. You'll likely get yet another box, lock and rug, too.
No. This will be the third trip back. That's what's so frustrating. One month the first time, two weeks the second. They have had it more than I have.
 

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I could understand if the Colt Paterson 1836 with 12" barrel, bent in a slow upward arc, which I viewed at the American Indian Museum in Washington, D.C., had a cylinder/barrel gap of .014-inch. To produce such a misfit revolver today is a disgrace.

Even with perfect chamber-to-bore alignment, an unsupported bullet is subject to the fiercely expanding gas behind it. Spray particulate? Indeed!

Dan Wesson produced some of the most accurate revolvers ever manufactured----production or custom. It gets expensive, however, when you have to manufacture the same gun twice.

Just as the production of .22 rimfire ammunition requires great attention to detail, so too must an unforgiving set of tolerances be adhered to for the production of a good rimfire revolver.

I think that it would save money and help to turn out a more complete product, for manufacturers periodically to hire the experience of certain persons with intimate knowledge in the end-use of revolvers, pistols, and rifles----to keep manufacturing between the guardrails.
David Bradshaw
 
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