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Discussion Starter #1
The LCR has the same barrel length+chamber as the SR22 (3.5"). All else being equal, would they have similar MV or would the revolver lose velocity due to the cylinder gap?
 

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the SR22 auto does not have a gap between the chamber and the bbl like the LCR22 does, so you do have a loss there not sure of the numbers tho. Doesnt really matter tho do like i did and buy one of each you will like both.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the SR22 auto does not have a gap between the chamber and the bbl like the LCR22 does, so you do have a loss there not sure of the numbers tho. Doesnt really matter tho do like i did and buy one of each you will like both.
I'm wondering if the blow back of the SR22 doesn't cause some loss and if that loss is equal to any loss in the cylinder gap of the revolver. Are the losses offsetting?

As for buying both; note the list of Rugers under my signature.
 

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I am no expert, but I think the velocity loss is due to the barrel length. Watching some You-tube videos an ammo, it seems about 15-20% from the manufactures stated velocity for .22 ammo, either standard or high velocity. I like that SR22p though, it's cheap fun at the range.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am no expert, but I think the velocity loss is due to the barrel length. Watching some You-tube videos an ammo, it seems about 15-20% from the manufactures stated velocity for .22 ammo, either standard or high velocity. I like that SR22p though, it's cheap fun at the range.
But the SR22 and the LCR 22 have the same barrel length...if you include the chamber in the LCR. Semi-autos barrel length includes the chamber, so for comparison you must include the chamber in the LCR and that is 3.5"....same as the SR22. Or measuring from the base of the cartridge to the muzzle and it is equal in both.
 

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With equal lengths and bores, MV would be the same, minus a loss from the LCR barrel/cylinder gap. That would likely be less than 10%, not significant to worry about. No more than the possible variation between two lots of the same ammunition.

With these very short barrels, we're probably losing 30-40% of the velocity and energy listed in ballistics tables for .22LR, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
With equal lengths and bores, MV would be the same, minus a loss from the LCR barrel/cylinder gap. That would likely be less than 10%, not significant to worry about. No more than the possible variation between two lots of the same ammunition.

With these very short barrels, we're probably losing 30-40% of the velocity and energy listed in ballistics tables for .22LR, anyway.
Common sense tells me that there is a loss due to the cylinder gap, then it occurred to me that there must be some loss in semi-autos, too because some of the energy generated is used to operate the action. How much is lost in each? I was just curious and thought maybe someone in the know had an answer. It's probably not much of a factor in the everyday scheme of things.

Strange that in rifles and semi-auto pistols the barrel length includes the chamber, but in revolvers, the cylinder (chamber) is excluded. One would think that the SR22 with a 3.5" barrel would be more accurate than the LCR with a 1-7/8" barrel when actually they are identical when measured from the cartridge base to the muzzle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I found my answer in the Sept. issue of the American Rifleman. An article covering both the SR22 and the LCR 22 has a chart showing the velocities of identical ammo fired in each and they are virtually the same, but a slight edge goes to the LCR. The loss in velocity due to the cylinder gap in the LCR 22 is slightly less than the loss in velocity due to the cycling of the slide in the SR22. Not what I expected.
 
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