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Looking at many of the posts in this section kind of reminds me of the old saying "Leave well enough alone".
Ever get to the point in a project where you just know if you try to get it any better you will screw it up ? And you did ?
Also just saying.....nothing wrong with seeking perfection but sometimes we get so focused that we lose perspective. Most of the time this disaster happens when we try to perform operations beyond our current knowledge or ability. :)
Maybe we should ask the gun smiths questions before we experiment on our own.:)
 

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There's a few saying that comes into mind here:

If it still works, you're not trying hard enough.

I fixed it to death. <<< Usually what I do.

If you take either a Rochester carb or a VW apart and back together enough times, you'll eventually have two of them.
 

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The Dan Wesson six inch .357 revolver had a fair single action trigger pull, but the double action pull was rough. Dry firing and shooting several hundred rounds really didn't seem to help. So, I decided to smooth the sear a bit. I worked on it until is was almost a mirror. The only problem was each time I reassembled and disassembled and worked on it with the Arkansas Stone the worse it got. I finally decided I had better take it to my experienced professional gunsmith friend. He took it out of the case, pulled the trigger several times looked up and asked me who had been working on the revolver. With a slightly red face I fessed up and told him what I had done. He took the revolver in the back, took it apart and informed me the sear was ruined and he would have to order a new one.

I supposed he wanted me to feel a little better and told me the story about the guy who brought his revolver in with all the pieces in a shoebox and couldn't get it back together. In any case, with the hammer/sear geometry and the critical safety nature of of the operation, I don't do sears anymore.

I've been taking things apart to see how they worked since a kid. There have been more than a few times parts were left over. There have also been interesting times when I repaired my grandmother's antique mantle clock that wouldn't run.
 
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