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Just change one or two parts at a time until you can put original stock rifle back together. You will then have two rifles and can start on your third. This has been my project since 2015 when I bought a Design Contest Winner. It has been a lot of fun.
 

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My 50th year takedown stainless 10/22 is stock except for the Magpul Backpacker stock. I really like that stock with its compartments and the way it attaches the barrel in take-down mode. It i also easy to revert to the factory stock if desired.
 

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My 10-22 carbine was purchased from Sears & Roebuck in 1968 for $54.95. Young eyes and open sights did just fine for the next 35 years, then I had to put a scope on her. She'll still keep 5 rds. inside an inch or less at 50 yds. Only the Good Lord knows how many rounds have been down that bore!

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 

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I love my 20 some yr old stock 10/22, I don't ever want to change a thing.....I hope my Grandchildren enjoy it too, and their kids.......
 

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As was suggested by @brnwlms & @GP Fan, the only "mod" you really should do on any Ruger 10/22 is to put in a new (polyurethane) bolt buffer (i.e., bolt stop.) The 10/22 I've had for 40 years has had many thousands of round through it and, over time, the bolt hammering into the factory, steel bolt stop/bolt buffer has elongated the hole it fits into as the receiver is aluminum and the factory buffer is steel. I replaced that steel pin with a polyurethane version and now I know the rifle won't suffer further damage from use.

Other than that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a stock 10/22! The more you shoot it, the more the trigger smooths out and that's usually my next big 'complaint (a gritty, heavy'ish trigger pull.) But I can live with that. I'm sure you can, too.

More benefits of the bolt buffer:
**It reduces that clinking sound when the bolt flies back and hits the rear of the receiver after firing a shot.
**It makes the action vibrate less, dampening the recoil sensation.
And - most important...
**It will prevent peening and cracks in your aluminum receiver

I think if I were to do it today, I'd use this KIDD bolt buffer:
https://www.coolguyguns.com/KIDD-22LR-Bolt-Buffer_p_12.html
 

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I have tried several different bolt buffers from four different manufacturers. The Kidd bolt buffer is the one I like the best. A little tricky to install the first few times, as are many others, but it quickly smooths out.
 

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One of those Kidd bolt buffers is now on my list.

I have a sort of tangential question about keeping a rifle "stock". I am, in part, a writer (professionally), and how we use words differently sometimes fascinates me. (At other times it infuriates me :mad: but not in this thread. :thumbsup:)

Specifically, what exactly is "stock" when it comes to a 10/22?

Certainly those who bought them decades ago with wood stocks and irons, for sure, stock. Likewise, when I think of today's standard carbines with synthetic or wood stocks and iron sights, I think stock.

But at some point, it seems with newer models, we cross a line from stock to not stock. For example, when I get my new 10/22 Compact (see my sad story about the delay in that elsewhere in the 10/22 sub-forum), it has the newer modular stock with swivel studs, and fiber optic sights. I don't really think of those features as "stock" even though I won't have changed a thing (except for the bolt buffer) out of the box. If I had bought a standard carbine those would be add on features.

Thoughts?
 

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One of those Kidd bolt buffers is now on my list.

I have a sort of tangential question about keeping a rifle "stock". I am, in part, a writer (professionally), and how we use words differently sometimes fascinates me. (At other times it infuriates me :mad: but not in this thread. :thumbsup:)

Specifically, what exactly is "stock" when it comes to a 10/22?

Certainly those who bought them decades ago with wood stocks and irons, for sure, stock. Likewise, when I think of today's standard carbines with synthetic or wood stocks and iron sights, I think stock.

But at some point, it seems with newer models, we cross a line from stock to not stock. For example, when I get my new 10/22 Compact (see my sad story about the delay in that elsewhere in the 10/22 sub-forum), it has the newer modular stock with swivel studs, and fiber optic sights. I don't really think of those features as "stock" even though I won't have changed a thing (except for the bolt buffer) out of the box. If I had bought a standard carbine those would be add on features.

Thoughts?
I still consider it stock if it is un-modified. The different models now available are really a response to what the customer wants and were modifying the guns to be. Different levels are popular in the gun industry and this is not limited to the 10/22. Take a look at all the levels available for the 1911. Take a look at Springfield Armory. They have 1911's at all levels from the basic GI model to a Trophy Match. Or even take a look at the models available for just about any bolt gun, but since this thread is Ruger, lets look at the M77 Hawkeye. Just take that rifle in .223. It is available in standard, Predator, and Varmint/Target. Would you consider the Varmint/Target not stock simply because it came from the factory in a variation from the "standard" model? So for me, if it the parts list is the same as the parts list for the model number, its stock.
 

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Most of my firearms are stock but I did swap out springs in the GP revolvers. As for my 10/22 I put in a BX trigger because it was on sale. It did tighten up long range shots a little due to the reduced pull weight. Put in a buffer for giggles and it did quiet the bolt some. Both mods were cheap with decent results.
 

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OP, you can’t do that!

Oh, wait- I did it, too. That’s the beauty of a 10/22. You can customize it until the cows come home. Or not. My stock 10/22 birch carbine is just fine the way it came out of the box.
 

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Stock except for 3x9 scope. Would have preferred the woody but was not redily available so settled for black.
 

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They only mod I did was foil tape the barrel block. It rattled a bit but is rock solid now. Took 10 minutes and cost 3" of foil hvac tape.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Sorry I haven't been here for a while! Ever since our federal election, I have been discouraged! They have elected the same government again! They will ban all military style rifles and handguns! That will include all AR-15 and semi-auto rifles! They will start around the Nov. 20! I'm so disgusted that I have lost interest in shooting! I appreciate all the wonderful advice you have given me! I also appreciate all the knowledge, I am very grateful. But it's just a matter of time before all those idiots ban all guns like they did in Australia! Once again thank for everything! Here's hoping for the best!
 

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my wood stock 10/22 is absolutely perfect as is, I would not want a thing ""improved"".. Its reliable to a fault.. I don't think I have ever has a single FTF,FTE, stovepipe ever, and I use the worst, dirtiest, cheapest .22 LR I can get my meat hooks into, and I seldom clean it. My opinion?.. Best firearm all around ever made by ruger.
 

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… But it's just a matter of time before all those idiots ban all guns like they did in Australia!...
Many of us understand the feeling, but keep in mind that there are still plenty of guns in Australia. It's not all cities...

And what idiot would call a 10-22 a "military style" rifle..?
 

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My 10/22 started as a plain "Tactical" model (16.25" threaded sporter barrel, synthetic barrel band stock, flash hider, no sights) and has gradually evolved into my current Steel challenge gun with the following changes/additions:

1.Replace the flash hider with a TandemKross "Game Changer" compensator to increase muzzle report to make the shot clock pick up the shots more reliably)

2. Replace the OEM stock with a take-off Ruger factory "Compact" replaceable comb stock and add a full length high comb insert to give a higher cheek weld.

3. Brimstone Tier 2 trigger job which includes the auto-release bolt stop and a vastly improved trigger pull.

4. Tactical Innovations left hand safety button. (Obviously, I'm left handed.)

5. Ruger's Picatinny rail scope mount.

6. Vortex Venom 3 MOA red dot sight.

7. Tactical Innovations "wrap-around" magazine release.

8. Tactical Innovations polished stainless steel e-clip guide rod.

So, my "stock" 10/22is not quite stock anymore but the changes have all been modestly priced and the total I have in it isn't too bad.
 
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