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Let me say up front that everybody is different and what works for me might not work for you and vice versa.

Like many of us I own and have owned lots of different types of guns. They've had all kinds of triggers: SA, DA, SA/DA, striker fired, 2 stage, etc. I readily admit some triggers are noticeably better than others but I don't understand why so many folks seem to have so much difficulty with stock triggers. I hear complaints about resets, slack, creep, grittiness, stiffness, etc. Maybe my experience is unique but of all the guns I've ever owned or fired not one of them had a trigger I couldn't live with as is. I agree that a nice trigger helps with marksmanship but I've yet to shoot a gun that the trigger was so bad it made good marksmanship impossible.

So my question to you is what was so bad about your stock trigger that you felt compelled to replace it? If you're a bench rest, varmint or bullseye shooter I get it. No need to explain, but for the rest of us using everyday utility, range, hunting or self defense guns what was so bad about the stock trigger that it needed replacing? Was it really that bad or did you just want a nicer one to customize your gun?
 

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triggers

The most expensive trigger I've tried yet is a Rock River 2-stage. Any other trigger mods have been using JE Spring kits. The JE kits are inexpensive and I wanted to experiment a little.

With a factory trigger I was getting a pull weight of 7.5-8.0 lbs. (no lube or polishing of parts). With the addition of a JE spring kit (yellow trigger, red hammer) the trigger pull improved to 5.0-5.5 lbs. I've had similar results on other units.

I recently built a lower using an Anderson build kit with their stainless steel trigger and hammer assembly. The trigger feels good as is but I'd still like to try swapping in a set of JE springs to see if it can be made better (for me).

I shoot for hobby/fun/enjoyment and a long heavy trigger just isn't very pleasant to shoot, especially when there are inexpensive alternatives.

BK
 

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Like you, Bonk, I never changed trigger springs in any of my guns, until I received a Taurus revolver. I TRIED to make that trigger work better, but after many different spring sets, I figured out it was the gun itself. Now the only use I have for a Taurus revolver is in carpentry, and unloaded.

My good friend, a gun store owner and gunsmith, always said, "Clean and lube the trigger area, fire 200 to 500 rounds, THEN if it isn't to your liking, I'll work on it". He never did a trigger job on a gun fresh out of the box.
 

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Well, I just purchased two brand new S&W model 640 Pro Series revolvers. I can honestly tell you that both of those revolvers have the absolute worst trigger I have ever felt on a handgun - PERIOD!!

If you are a regular wheel-gun shooter, then you know that DAO revolvers, like the 640 series by S&W, have a usually long trigger pull. That is fine by me, and I have a regular stock 640 that has a very good trigger. But, the two brand new 640 Pro Series revolvers that I just bought have downright horrible triggers. The reason is this: When you are staging the long DAO pull on a revolver, you should be able to predict where it breaks and eventually has a nice crisp let off. On S&W revolvers, if you listen closely enough, there are three clicks that you will hear when dry firing (2 clicks, then the 3rd click being the firing pin hitting the primer, or snap-cap if dry firing). After the first two clicks, there should be very little resistance left until that nice clean break that lets off a round.

Such is not the case on my two brand new 640 Pro Series S&W revolvers. Rather, after the first two clicks, there is then a tremendous buildup of stacking that requires a very great amount of pressure until you finally get to the 3rd click/bang. I wound venture to say that most ladies out there would have a heck of a time getting through that last bit of stacking to finally get the shot off. I would say the same would be the case with most seniors as well. That is totally unacceptable, and especially on what S&W claims is a "Pro Series" revolver. These are triggers that I can not simply live with. After firing wheel-guns for over 35 years, I have yet to come across a S&W revolver with such a trigger as these two new 640 Pro Series of mine have.

Not only will such affect accuracy, but I am sure it is only a matter of time before they start spitting lead. I did not pop off the side plate, but I am guessing that the hand on these two revolvers is too long. That is the only thing I can think of that would make them operate in the manner that they do. They both must have been assembled on a Friday at 4:30pm at the factory. Joking aside, they are a perfect example of a factory trigger that is simply unacceptable and not usable.

Bonk, I hope this example shows you that not everybody wanting to change their factory trigger is just being nit-picky or spoiled. There are some very bad factory triggers sometimes - and these days it seems much more common than in past decades.
 

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For me, it's all a matter of what type of shooting I want to do as to what I need/want in a trigger.

When shooting for score or group size, from the bench or when shooting without a rest, I get very fussy about a trigger. When shooting a gun for hunting or just plain fun shooting, I can live with a so-so trigger, the exception being the DA pull on a DA revolver. I can't abide a bad DA pull on any DA revolver for any application.

I'm fortunate in that I have local shops that allow me to try a trigger on a gun before I buy, so I've only rarely taken a gun home that didn't have a fairly decent trigger, out of the box.
 

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Like you, Bonk, I never changed trigger springs in any of my guns, until I received a Taurus revolver. I TRIED to make that trigger work better, but after many different spring sets, I figured out it was the gun itself. Now the only use I have for a Taurus revolver is in carpentry, and unloaded.

My good friend, a gun store owner and gunsmith, always said, "Clean and lube the trigger area, fire 200 to 500 rounds, THEN if it isn't to your liking, I'll work on it". He never did a trigger job on a gun fresh out of the box.
osprey,

I agree with your gunsmith that almost always I would never do a trigger job on a fresh out of the box gun. That is sound advice and breaking in a gun with hundreds of trigger pulls first is almost always the way to go. If after doing that, the trigger is still bad, then I agree it's time to work on it. But, my two new S&W 640 Pro Series revolvers have something just not right with them. Again, my hunch is over-length hands in them.

Anyhow, they are both at my local gunsmith and he even was shocked when he felt the triggers on them. He said he had felt this before with some of the new S&W revolvers being put out in the last few years. It will be interesting to see what he has to say after he finishes up with them. I didn't want to send them back to S&W only to have the same moron that assembled them in the first place be the same guy who would now be "fixing" them.
 

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I usually dry fire my handguns, particularly revolvers, about 500 times when new, before any trigger work. This usually smooths out the trigger quite a bit. Then, as NC Gal, depending what on whether the handgun is for target or self defense, will I determine whether I'll have action work done.

Triggers on my hunting rifles are smoother, not necessary lighter.
 

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I learned to shoot with a high standard double nine.....I can crack walnuts with my index finger
 

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All mine are stock.
I am happy with how they are after putting some rounds through them.
 

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I learned to shoot with a high standard double nine.....I can crack walnuts with my index finger
Then you just might be able to handle the DA trigger on many of the unmodified Polish P-64 pistols (really nice SA trigger, but it has to be a 25 lb DA pull, there is a reason this one doesn't look to have been shot much :eek: )
 

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A trigger should never be anything more than the final connection to the round in your target. Worst trigger ever was the butterfly on a Ma Deuce with a night vision sniper scope. Couldn't hit anything smaller than a head at 1500 meters. Thanks for the memories Uncle Sam.
 

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IMO and experience the worst triggers for me to handle are Glocks and other striker fired handguns. In handguns S&W revolvers are the best out of the box. The only time I have ever changed springs in a revolver was many years ago in a Security Six but I put the stock springs back in a short time later. Now days I tend to think along the lines of shoot the revolver 500-1000 times then decide if it needs work. Most never do again IMO. In rifles the best out of box trigger I ever owned are Tikka T 3's and I have 3 of them. Great factory triggers. However the new Model 70 Winchesters are good too and I have 4 of those and several New Havens that are not bad either. Worst rifle trigger I ever owned was a Weatherby Vanguard but Timney had a very nice quick fix that cured the gritty two stage feel.
 

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worked a little on some, left others stock. each weapon has a different use and each trigger, even on similar weapons of the same manufacturer and same model, can be different. CC pistols for me need a heavier trigger than something that is strictly target. mistakes are bad. I always tell children there are two things in life that can not be called back nor "I'm sorried" away. one is words, the other bullets. both are potentially horribly destructive.
 

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As others have said, it all depends on the application. When I was thinking of getting into 3 gun, I bought the Geissele SS3G. I paid $200 for it and I would pay for it again and again without regret. As for my handguns, I tend to do my own trigger jobs. I don't try to make them lighter, but instead a bit smoother. I don't like any grittiness in my triggers. To each their own I guess.
 

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I don't know what I'm mi$$ing and that could be a good thing.

Mine are all stock triggers.
 

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I've never felt the need for replacing a trigger, or even working on one. My 1st gun was the SR9C and I think after about the 12th round I never thought about the trigger again. The only gun I had to adjust to was the GP100 and even that was just a matter of shooting it a little. It does break where it, to me, should break so the learning curve was pretty quick.

The one thing I intend to work on is going from the GP100 to the Kimber 1911. The 1st time I did that I inadvertently double-tapped the Kimber twice. That'll make ya go hmmmm. My guess on the Kimber is about a 3lb pull. And the SR1911 isn't much more. I want to get used to that so I intend to work on it.
 

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EVERY rifle I have...........has had trigger work. Be that my BR rifles, or a 22 plinker. Now while I don't want a 4oz BR trigger on a plinker, I also don't want it to have an 8lb gritty, creepy, factory trigger. Shooting rifles with horrible triggers, will hurt your feel for "good" triggers on those rifles. That said, while I don't put super light triggers on my plinkers or casual shooters, they are VERY crisp and clean.

I rarely modify pistol triggers, because I am not a heavy pistol shooter, but if one is absolutely horrible, I will work on it
 

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Once you experience a nice trigger, it is very hard not to find fault in every other revolver (or rifle) you pick up. It really spoils you. I like my revolvers to have a nice 2#, smooth, no creep trigger. I've had Munden jobs on several of mine, and there really is no comparison. When you have to pull on a creepy, gritty, 4#-6# trigger ... you just want to put it back down after a few shots.
 

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I have always used the stock triggers on all my guns and thought I was shooting just fine.
Untill the day I bought a second hand Ruger MKII that had a Millet red dot sight already installed on a rib. Ready to go. I had never shot a gun with a dot sight and hoped it would allow me to shoot handguns again ( blindness in dominant eye and surgery in the other left me unable to see iron sights). The seller said put the dot on the target squeeze and it's hit. No trying to see 3 different things. So I bought it. Even though I had at home a MKI Target already.
First trip to the range proved it to be a magical thing. put that red dot on your target, think about hitting it and bang , the target is hit , dead center....the gun was scary!
I've never been able to hit things like that ! The MKI Target trigger was not in the same class. Something was up big time . I knew that trigger wasn't stock factory...it was just too sweet shooting. And I was right.
Turns out the owner had sent it to Clark Custom Guns for a Target Trigger job and had the red dot installed at the same time. It does make a difference...BIG TIME!
Once you've shot a really nice trigger, done buy a outfit like Clark Custom....it will ruin you...shooting that MKII is near about a religious experience.
Gary
 
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