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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious to see what everyone uses for long term storage of bullet molds for corrosion protection i.e., aluminum and steel molds. The RCBS molds come with the little green storage container, but do you coat them with a heavy oil? Unfortunately the Lee aluminum molds do not come apart (2 cavity mold) and do not come with a storage container.
 

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I like the VCI paper to wrap my steel molds and place them in their original containers, the aluminum molds are stored in the cardboard boxes after being wiped clean.
 

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After use I clean them up and spray with Liquid Wrench Dry Lube. Inside and out .
Aluminum moulds don't rust but the steel sprue plates do. Steel moulds will so need a bit of protection. I keep some of them stored in an old G. I. ammo can and others in a plastic tool box. If I don't have the plastic / cardboard box they came in I wrap with a silicone or light oil impregnated cloth , to keep them from hitting together.
Now, the Liquid Wrench Dry Lube...it does not contaminate the mould cavities, spray it on and it acts as a mould release. It doesn't have to be removed, doesn't cause wrinkled bullets, works great on the sprue plate, keeps smears and galling from happening, Also works to lubricate the sprue plate screw and hinge pin.
I live in Louisiana and we have heat and humidity galore. Spray the moulds, put away and I have had no rusting.
Try the stuff on your next mould...you will not believe how the bullets seem to jump out of the cavities.
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Some good ideas, I like reading about using the VCI Paper for the steel molds and also the Liquid Wrench Dry Lube, especially the part about "it acts as a mould release".
 

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What ever method you select, make sure it works and you're thorough. Any rusted mold is a bummer, and a rusted mold that throws good bullets is a tragedy! Trust me...I've been there.

Over the years I've left the last bullet in the mold, including the sprue. I oil the hell out of the mold with CLP; top, bottom, sprue plate, attachment screws and their holes, the whole works...a lot of oil. I wrap it up in the VPI paper, and return it to the box it came in.

All my molds, some two dozen of them, go into a cpl of GI ammo cans that seal completely, along with VPI desiccant packets. Yep, I'm paranoid, but it's worth the effort, believe me.

Prior to use, I spray them off with electrical contact cleaner or brake cleaner after washing with dish washing liquid and hot water. This system of cleaning takes 10 minutes at most and results in good bullets after mold warm-up in minutes. I get 10-15 culls while the mold comes up to temp. then good bullets.

As a result of the above, I've come to appreciate brass molds: Mihec and Accurate make especially good ones and the price/quality ratio is superb. Treat yourself to a good mold and you'll never be satisfied with the others again. Too, you can specify the mold size for the alloy you use. For me it's wheel weights +1-2% tin. The alloy in part, determines the finished, "as cast" diameter of the bullet.

HTH's Rod
 

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I depends on where you live. In Montana, there is relatively low humidity. 45 years ago, when I started casting, I always oiled my steel moulds and then had to degrease them for the next use. 40 years ago, I got tired of that and quit treating them. They are hot and dry when I put them away, and I've seen no rust in those 40 years.
 
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