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Take it to a competent gunsmith. The M77 triggers can be cleaned up real nice. A good friend of mine that got killed in an accident a few years ago did some of my M77’s. They are great triggers now breaking about 3 - 3 1/2 pounds. Just replacing the spring(s) isn’t going to do much for it. I’ve never used the Timney triggers so I can’t comment on them. I know the GS route would be cheaper than the Timney though.
 

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My M77 Mark II has a hard triger pull thinking of replacing it with a brownell spring.
Well, I've done several of these, and the Brownell's spring will drop the trigger tension a fair amount. Then you will have a lighter trigger with a sandy, gritty feel.

Then again, you can replace the sear, trigger, or both, plus a spring swap.

It doesn't take a lot of tools do improve the existing trigger, but getting it wrong is a hazard if you don't do it correctly. You need a vise, and one of the modeling units with small jaws and the ability to move position and angle of the parts is a big advantage.

Then you need a fine hone, or very fine emory. I start with the emory at 1200grit, mounted on a tongue depressor for a flat surface. Then maintaining the angles on the trigger and sear, carefully polish the contact surfaces. I finish that with a small buffing wheel in my Dremel. Remove a minimum of metal. This is due to a very thin surface hardening on the parts, that is also highly variable set to set. Take too much off and they will wear rapidly, creating a unpredictable letoff.

Try the spring first as it costs about $5. If it just doesn't cut it, go for a replacement set from Rifle Basix, Timney, or Jard. There's probably others, but I haven't tried them. The Rifle Basix had the least amount of fitting issues.
 
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