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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just paid a bit of a premium for a M77 with a dual marked barrel. It's been shot and doesn't have the original box but it's in very good condition. I guess in todays market I'm not sure what is a premium and what is going price but I paid $250 more than I would for a normal M77.

I'm not a true collector but I like the dual stamped barrel. .280 is an interesting caliber and the marketing genius or lack of genius of Remington to try to gain market share by renaming it is fascinating to me. Ruger didn't completly buy in to the new name instead they just dual stamped their barrels.

Does anyone know if there is much of a collectors market for these rifles?
 

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Corps Commander NGV
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Sounds like a great hunting rifle. Someone else would have to comment on the collector side. With ammo manufactured both ways after Remington flip-flopped on the name Ruger just wanted the owner to know ammo marked either way was ok. If something didn't sell, Remington would call it something else and hope the new name would make it popular. The .244/ 6mm Rem comes to mind.
 

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I think it’s a neat little caliber but I don’t see it as a collector type rifle, but that’s just me. I think it’s more about finding the right person and a little bit of timing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@ngashooter- no doubt it's a good hunting rifle. I'd like to see how many near misses Remington had on caliber development. .260 Remington comes to mind especially with the popularity of 6.5 Creedmore. Not trying to start a caliber war, just find it interesting how often and how close Remington came to some very popular calibers.

@Mark204- I agree .280 is a neat caliber and a M77 is fairly common rifle, so it's not exactly a valuable collectible. However, I believe Ruger dual stamped the barrels for at least 6 years, roughly 1979 to 1985. Maybe longer?

I guess you can collect anything, it doesn't make it more valuable though.
 

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I saw one of those in the used gun rack and passed, but I don't want that caliber. Couple of years ago and something like $400. I thought the markings are common and the odds of someone wanting to collect that model are slim.
 

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I wonder about the lifespan of the .280, the .270 and 30/06 are so popular and will last forever but the 280 bullet is only .007" bigger than .277?? At least it will be easy to expand the .270 case for 280 reloads.

"Remington renamed the cartridge in late 1978 to 7mm-06 Remington but just before the end of the year they renamed it again calling it the 7 mm Express in an attempt to increase sales. This resulted in people confusing it with the 7 mm Remington Magnum, and Remington changed the name back to .280 in 1981."

That is the reason why I like the newer .308 case size, it makes more sense. The .243 Win, then .260 Rem (.264"), the 7mm/08 is .284" and the .308". Easy, fairly even graduations.
And I own and love the .260 Rem, a few years ago it was the most popular long-range target round but then the Creed beat it out. I also own a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I appreciate the comments. They may not be what I want to hear but I have no reason to disagree.

@Randy99CL- I don't have data to disagree with the idea that the markings are common. I guess I don't consider the .280 a common caliber so by default I don't think of anything in .280 as common. The markings may not be rare either. I suppose the term common can be relative. If half of the M77's Ruger made in .280 have the dual markings then that could be considered common.

Regardless, I respect your reasoning behind the .308 case. The 7mm/08 and .280 are very similar. I'm simply not a good enough marksman to take advantage of the differences.
 

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The .280 is an interesting cartridge in that upon introduction, it was never fully appreciated, but lately, ironically, it has become more popular, especially the AI version, which kind of baffles me as it’s so close performance-wise that it is almost a 7mm rem mag. Well, I guess the argument could be made that if the 7mm rem mag had been introduced first, the .280 would not wear the Remington name. The .280 was introduced only 5 year before the 7mm rem mag. I am sure that was a huge reason the .280 has been under-appreciated in the market.
 
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