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Good morning, all.

I have been considering having my .454 2.5" Alaskan Mag-na-ported in the hopes that follow up shots, if needed, will be quicker and more on target. Has anyone had any experience(s) with Mag-na-port? If so, what are your thoughts on the quality of work? Will the loss of velocity render the .454 useless against large game?

Take care, and have a great day.
Aaron
 

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Your first question was about the quality of work by Magnaport - so first - they're as good as anyone in the market, and better than most. If I were a fan of porting in Alaskans, they would be my go-to company to do it. But as you'll see below, I'm not a fan of porting in Alaskans.

Your second question asked if magnaporting would render the 454C useless against large game. Remember - a magnaported Alaskan in .454C will still have greater muzzle velocity, meaning greater energy and momentum too, than a long barreled 44magnum or 45colt, either of which would readily and rapidly kill even the largest of bears. No, doing so will not make it useless against large game.

The question you didn't ask, but what I feel is the linchpin question for this project: "Is magnaporting an Alaskan worth doing?" To which, my answer is no. While magnaporting won't cripple the 454C, it will, however, elicit more visible flash and more concussive blast to the shooter as well. It'll help take a bit of the bite out of the top of your hand, but in my experience, not enough for me to spend money on it. The recoil taming benefit is real and noticeable, but it's not even as noticeable as a reduced power load - and frankly, reduced power loads are readily available even to a non-reloader, as many factory loads operate at 50kpsi instead of the SAAMI MAP 65kpsi, and "45Colt +P" loads are readily available as well. So for me - given the trade off of lost MV to get reduced recoil - a guy can do the same (or more) by changing the powder charge in the case instead of drilling holes in the barrel.
 

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I had my 10mm Glock magna-ported and a .300 win mag rifle done by them. The job was fast, high quality, done exactly as described, and reasonably priced. The Glock porting showed moderate muzzle jump reduction, and the .300 WinMag (magna-port ports, not the muzzle brake) did not substantially improve muzzle jump. I later on put a muzzle brake on the .300 (not magna-port) and that made a difference. Just my experience with them.
 

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My first revolver was a S&W 460 mag XVR. I love that gun! It is ported. It is actually one of my most accurate guns. A few years ago, I bought a Redhawk in 45 Colt. My plan was to shoot heavy loads out of it. I got the bright idea to have it Mag-na-ported to keep the muzzle flip down. I very much regret that decision. Their work is first class, however, I don't think it made that much of a difference and it cost me a lot of money. At this point, I would like to replace the barrel. It has been a very expensive mistake in my opinion.
 

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I'm the guy you need. As you see, I've ported both 454 and 44 magnum Alaskans and yes Mag-Na-Port is top rate with quality work to be sure. Some of their "specials" command very high prices and have a collector interest all their own. These custom pieces are where they get to experiment with new ideas in porting and have since come up with a number of options in porting your handgun. Want rifle porting on your long barreled handgun? Not a problem now. Dual port, quad port, double whizbang porting, (I'm kidding here), but they do really have it all including Auto-porting where both slide and barrel have to be ported. That last really looks awesome as the ports in the slide have to be much larger in order for the escaping gas from the barrel to be sure it has a clear path outside of the gun and through the ports in the slide.

Now back to the Alaskan. As you know the Alaskan has an elongated frame around the barrel thread portion of the frame. Easier to notice what's going on in the 7.5" and 9.5" barrels. Lots of threads for a more secure lock up, but still a regular "crush fit" between barrel and frame. Ie. the barrel not only goes inside the frame where thread meet thread, but on the outside the barrel is of larger diameter than would fit inside the frame. So much so that the last few cranks of the barrel actually crushes the metal surfaces locking them into place so as not to come undone. Kind of a problem to do that with an Alaskan since the barrel and frame stop at pretty much the same spot.

So in the Alaskans and only in them (not to be found in any of the other barrel lengths), Ruger uses a liner of some proprietary polymer that's a single use item. Need barrel replacement from Ruger? They'd have to remove old barrel and liner and not be able to reuse any of them with the new set up. A new (longer than 2.5" barrel and a new uninstalled line) would be put into use. After the barrel is cranked into place with the liner in place also, there is a crush fit on the metal to metal contact between barrel and frame and the chemicals in the poly liner heat up (exothermic reaction) and fuse the barrel into place. Kind of a really tough/nasty epoxy type of thing. The portion of the temporary barrel that had a surface that the Ruger Alaskan Barrel Wrench mated with is then no longer needed, so the gun is off to the mill to get bobbed off (leaving the necessary metal the provided the "crush fit" intact.) It then is crowned and polished to perfection and looks as you see it now.

What that means for porting? Well, EDM machining is what Mag-Na-Port uses in it's porting operation. An electric arc is created in the juiced up oil that contains abrasive particles in it. This electrified oil is pumped out in the shape of the eventual port going in at the eventual angle you'll see the finished port. This is why their work is so precise with no burrs or areas to polish or clean up after machining. Well that's just fine until they get to the poly liner. That stuff does not conduct electricity. So now a skilled worker has to use special tooling (read dental picks) to goober out the lining that occurs inside the port. Once that liner is sufficiently removed from the port hole, then the gun can get clamped in once again and the EDM fired up once more for a second EDM port cut to be made. What that means is they actually have to do two port jobs including the whole pick the liner thing. That gooses the cost of an Alaskan to what a quad port would cost. Just to let you know and to explain a little on what's going on. Fun stuff, stunning looking and very functional indeed. you will not regret any nickel spent on the work and be proud you had it done. Smithy.
 

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I just sold a Super Blackhawk .44Mag that was Magnaported. I honestly could not tell any reduction in muzzle flip with the porting. IMO it was money wasted. All it did was plaster the front sight with fouling.
 

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IMO it was money wasted. All it did was plaster the front sight with fouling.[/QUOTE said:
Lead rounds one. and two, check your alloy. Sound like not only lead, but very soft (or softer than other alloys) lead. Soft lead and weak loads (also the screamers) tend to past not only lead but unburnt powder fowling as well. Sure it becomes another area to pay attention to when cleaning the firearm. I found it much simpler to use a hard cast lead bullet (meaning my own. Lots of antimony in the mix) and I got NO leading whatsoever. Also with a clean powder and moderate velocities, there won't be the unburnt powder problem on the front sight either. In fact I don't notice it at all now that I'm shooting a better load.


Now that I think about it. it really does sound like your loads may be on the light side of things. What do you think? Are you after recoil reduction in the loads you are making? That would explain the leading, powder deposits, and the inability to notice any sort of effect of the mag-na-porting. I've actually seen this tested. (Shot Show, way too many years ago) where a Ransom rest was put to use so as to eliminate any sort of pollution that the testors could inflict on the results, both good or bad. Not only in the digital results of the piezoelectric strain gauge and a bunch of other scientific equipment that went way over my pay grade, showed a vast difference in the upwards force on the 8" barrel that was selected as the test weapon barrel length (they did other lengths as well), but you could easily visibly see the difference in the amount of movement allowed by the Ransom Rest itself. They had a high speed camera shooting during the actual firing of the weapon and a zebra colored background so that measurements of movement could be seen and recorded after playback of the film. Yep both in looks and in measured results, the Mag-Na-Ported gun always showed a drastic improvement in recoil reduction as well as muzzle flip. Not sure what to tell you about your experiences? Maybe the gun? the load as mentioned above? Amount of rounds fired that day? Who knows? I just know that Mag-Na-Port does indeed WORK!!!

If you look close on the actual ports, you'll notice that first they are spaced ninety degrees apart so a 45 to the left is one port and a 45 to the right is the other port. That keeps the gun's muzzle down or at least fights against its rise. Then look into the port itself and you'll notice a backwards rake to the port. Not so sure about the degrees of backwards rake, but it's what has been determined to be most effective. Any more would not be noticed and any less would increase felt recoil. Again, proper ported (single or multiple ports) on the short barreled guns benefit as well as long barreled hunting guns in keeping the gun on target to get that follow up shot off more quickly that ever possible prior to porting. All guns no matter the barrel length will notice some improvement. Admittedly some will be more noticeable than others so you must decide if your gun is a good candidate for porting. It sounds like (in the OP) that you've already figured out that yours is a good candidate so the only thing left is to figure out if Mag-Na-Port is the porting to go with. Larry Kelly has a lengthy list of engineering degrees as well as being a metallurgist among other qualifications. I'd stick with him and the Mag-Na-Porting. Smithy.
 

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I'm with Varminteror, on this one, Mag Na Porting a short barreled hand gun is useless as a screen door on a submarine. It just doesn't do anything to reduce recoil to assist in follow up shots.
 

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The bolded and underlined statements below are incorrect (or rather, the entirety of this message below is incorrect). Ruger does not and has never used a thermoplastic polymer proprietary adhesive barrel liner in the Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan.

I've seen Smithy pass this off on this board many times, it's been incorrect every time. I've pulled Alaskan barrels myself using an expanding brass mandrel, there was nothing at all on the threads of the two I pulled, and certainly not any plastic liner, melted or not.

Don't believe me, call Ruger and Magnaport yourself and ask, I called both again today and they confirmed more of the same:

Magnaport: (586) 469-6727

Ruger: (336) 949-5200 Option 4

Both confirmed there is no polymer sleeve of any kind used in assembling the Alaskan, nor has there ever been. Magnaport commented that they occasionally see some kind of either thread locker OR anti-seize as they burn through, but they do NOT have to interrupt their burn to clean it out to continue.

So in the Alaskans and only in them (not to be found in any of the other barrel lengths), Ruger uses a liner of some proprietary polymer that's a single use item. Need barrel replacement from Ruger? They'd have to remove old barrel and liner and not be able to reuse any of them with the new set up. A new (longer than 2.5" barrel and a new uninstalled line) would be put into use. After the barrel is cranked into place with the liner in place also, there is a crush fit on the metal to metal contact between barrel and frame and the chemicals in the poly liner heat up (exothermic reaction) and fuse the barrel into place. Kind of a really tough/nasty epoxy type of thing. The portion of the temporary barrel that had a surface that the Ruger Alaskan Barrel Wrench mated with is then no longer needed, so the gun is off to the mill to get bobbed off (leaving the necessary metal the provided the "crush fit" intact.) It then is crowned and polished to perfection and looks as you see it now.

What that means for porting? Well, EDM machining is what Mag-Na-Port uses in it's porting operation. An electric arc is created in the juiced up oil that contains abrasive particles in it. This electrified oil is pumped out in the shape of the eventual port going in at the eventual angle you'll see the finished port. This is why their work is so precise with no burrs or areas to polish or clean up after machining. Well that's just fine until they get to the poly liner. That stuff does not conduct electricity. So now a skilled worker has to use special tooling (read dental picks) to goober out the lining that occurs inside the port. Once that liner is sufficiently removed from the port hole, then the gun can get clamped in once again and the EDM fired up once more for a second EDM port cut to be made. What that means is they actually have to do two port jobs including the whole pick the liner thing. That gooses the cost of an Alaskan to what a quad port would cost.
I also bolded and underlined this line - I specifically asked Magnaport if this occurred. They confirmed "no, we don't have any dental picks here." The extra cost ($119.50 for an Alaskan vs. $99.50 for a standard SRH) to port an Alaskan is because they spend extra "burn time" cutting through the thickness of the frame. There is NO interruption to the port cutting process or manual labor to remove any adhesive or "crushable liner" by their technicians or gunsmiths.

Not sure where he got this information, but it's bad info.
 
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