Ruger Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just put a Mark III .22 rim fire pistol on layaway. I've been reading that it is very hard to disassemble and clean. Is that true? I bought it anyway because I've read what a great shooting gun it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The first few times it is a little tough to disassemble but really not that bad overall. If you follow the instructions exactly (Ruger has very good vids on this on their site) it shoudl take less than 20 minutes the 1st time.

Cleaning after disassembly is no different than any otehr gun.

When I bought it I took it apart and reassembled it 3 times before ever shooting it and by the 3rd time it was down to maybe 5 minutes if that...don't worry about it but do watch their vids and follow the instructions exactly and you won't have any trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,407 Posts
The first few times it is a little tough to disassemble but really not that bad overall. If you follow the instructions exactly (Ruger has very good vids on this on their site) it shoudl take less than 20 minutes the 1st time.

Cleaning after disassembly is no different than any otehr gun.

When I bought it I took it apart and reassembled it 3 times before ever shooting it and by the 3rd time it was down to maybe 5 minutes if that...don't worry about it but do watch their vids and follow the instructions exactly and you won't have any trouble.
What tech said. Follow the instructions included with your Ruger word for word. When I first got mine, I watched video after video and none were as accurate as the instruction booklet.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,407 Posts
The first couple of times are no fun, as there are several steps that have to be done in order. Just follow the manual and take your time.

I had a Mark I years ago. After 26 years away from shooting I got a Mark III. Except for the steps requiring use of the mag, because of the mag safety, it was the same and I had no trouble, remembering enough from years before.

I have since removed that PITA mag safety, and can strip it or assemble it in two minutes.

You'll need a small rubber or plastic mallet, head the size of a quarter will do nicely.

Here's a link to the online manual:

https://ruger-docs.s3.amazonaws.com/_manuals/markIII.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
I found that the instructions in the owners manual work better than all those videos. Just remember the position the gun is in while following the instructions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
cleaning

If you follow the directions,you should not have any problems.There are several videos online that show you step by step how to do it.The one I use is by No More Special Ops 4. on utube.I now use a speed strip kit,which you can find [email protected] $60.00.I hope you enjoy your new weapon as much as I do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,217 Posts
The more you fire it and the more you break it down and clean it, the easier it gets. It is a nice tight gun with close tolerances, which is what you want, so it needs to loosen up a little, which it will. Amen on the rubber mallet. It sure beats a block of 2X2 or 2X4 which I used on my first MK1 many many moons ago.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
29 Posts
They are great guns. Probably good as any .22 you will ever own. There are two little tricks. Hammer Position and holding the barrel up at an angle when reassembling it. The angle makes the mainspring pin latch line up when you insert it through the bolt. You have to do this or the pin will not fully insert preventing the bolt from opening fully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
That video is excellent. The owners manual leave a lot to be desired. There's a few missing steps in there.Yiogo
 

·
Ausmerican.
Joined
·
42,767 Posts
Follow the instructions and you will be fine..... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
Yes, as others have said, don't let the dis-assembly re-assembly worry you. It is not near as bad as some paint it. Actually it is fun to take down.

It would be a shame to miss out on one of the best and accurate target pistols because of this concern. I have a friend who actually got rid of his when he couldn't get it back together. When I later showed him how simple it was, he wished he had kept it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks

Yes, as others have said, don't let the dis-assembly re-assembly worry you. It is not near as bad as some paint it. Actually it is fun to take down.

It would be a shame to miss out on one of the best and accurate target pistols because of this concern. I have a friend who actually got rid of his when he couldn't get it back together. When I later showed him how simple it was, he wished he had kept it.

A co-worker brought his Mark II into work yesterday and showed me how to disassemble it. It doesn't look very difficult. By the way, where do you get those Ruger icons to put with your signature?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,504 Posts
Yes, as others have said, don't let the dis-assembly re-assembly worry you. It is not near as bad as some paint it. Actually it is fun to take down.It would be a shame to miss out on one of the best and accurate target pistols because of this concern. I have a friend who actually got rid of his when he couldn't get it back together. When I later showed him how simple it was, he wished he had kept it.
I own a 1976 Mark I that spent 35 years in storage with less than a thousand rounds through it because of how hard it is to take down and reassemble.

Last year I took it out shooting again and it is indeed very accurate, but the hour of swearing that accompanied reassembly after cleaning reminded me of why it went into storage in the first place.

I've seen the videos, but with my gun no amount of pounding with a hammer will get things to line up so the large pin will fit through the hole.
It takes a screw driver prying things into alignment from the top while holding the gun and pushing the pin... a three-handed job.

Nice accurate gun... now back in storage.

I bought a Ruger Single Ten for plinking...
 

·
Wandering Sandlapper
Joined
·
3,282 Posts
I own a 1976 Mark I that spent 35 years in storage with less than a thousand rounds through it because of how hard it is to take down and reassemble.
HA! I did the same thing with my 1972 Standard.

Toted that thing around for years and shot it little because I didn't want to try to piece it back together. Finally broke down and started shooting it. Got use to cleaning it, but it's still a PITA.

Then I bought a 22/45, which makes cleaning the Standard seem like playschool.

I just clean the barrel and what I can get to with the bolt open, and shoot some gun scrubber and CLP into the works, shake it out and keep shootin.

If it ever gets really gummed up I'll sell it to someone who want to clean it.

The Marks are Rubik's Cubes that shoot .22LR :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,196 Posts
I own a 1976 Mark I that spent 35 years in storage with less than a thousand rounds through it because of how hard it is to take down and reassemble.

Last year I took it out shooting again and it is indeed very accurate, but the hour of swearing that accompanied reassembly after cleaning reminded me of why it went into storage in the first place.

I've seen the videos, but with my gun no amount of pounding with a hammer will get things to line up so the large pin will fit through the hole.
It takes a screw driver prying things into alignment from the top while holding the gun and pushing the pin... a three-handed job.

Nice accurate gun... now back in storage.

I bought a Ruger Single Ten for plinking...
Somewhere here in the forum is a suggestion to use a bolt to align the holes to line up.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top