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According to Rugers Facebook page it's a done deal. Now the negative Nellie's will go crazy. I'm pleased as punch as I bought Marlins before a bought any other firearm. I hoped since Remington talked about bankruptcy that Ruger would acquire Marlin. Now we still have American designed and made lever rifle
 

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I've got a few Rugers, a Mini-14, a P95, a P345 and am looking at putting together a Stainless Mini-14.
I also have a Marlin 60 from when I was in college. I just hope they keep the 60 in the lineup.
 

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Is this a wish or have you heard that this might actually be in the works? Personally, I don’t see Ruger doing it. They have a good thing going with their brand and are not part of some holdings company so they have this far resisted acquisitions. I don’t see that happening and Ruger would be smart to stick with being Ruger.


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It appears that Vista Outdoors will get the ammunition business, which will put it with Speer, CCI, Blazer, and American Eagle ammunition. Right now, ammo appears to be a very lucrative business, to say the least.
Meanwhile the firearm manufacturing was apparently purchased in part by Sturm Ruger & Co. The rest of the manufacturing was purchase by Round Hill Group LLC, who doesn’t seem to have any previous presence in the firearm industry. So, what does this all mean for gun buyers?
Honestly, it probably doesn’t mean all that much. For now, guns will still be made and sold just like they have been. Fewer individual companies is problematic since it ultimately reduces competition which can ultimately lead to higher prices, but that’s not likely to be a factor for some time. This was copied from Bearing arms news ..
 

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PSA lost out in the Bid for the Remington Ammo Division. But with Vista outdoors now pretty much owning all Ammo brands Except for Olin/Winchester and Hornady. I hope they don't decide to Switch to the Non-civilian Market. That will not be good at all..
 

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Once Remington upgraded the equipment, they moved production to Ilion, New York. I’m interested to see if the acquisition includes both machinery and real estate.
See both bolded yellow parts of the statement below:

Marlin Firearms

September 30, 2020

Sturm, Ruger and Company, Inc. (NYSE: RGR) announced today that its offer to purchase substantially all of the Marlin Firearms assets was accepted by Remington Outdoor Company, Inc. and approved by the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of Alabama. The Company will pay the $30 million purchase price from cash on hand at the time of closing, which is expected to occur in October.

.....

The transaction is exclusively for the Marlin Firearms assets. Remington firearms, ammunition, other Remington Outdoor brands, and all facilities and real estate are excluded from the Ruger purchase. Once the purchase is completed, the Company will begin the process of relocating the Marlin Firearms assets to existing Ruger manufacturing facilities.

"The important thing for consumers, retailers and distributors to know at this point in time," continued Killoy, "is that the Marlin brand and its great products will live on. Long Live the Lever Gun."
 

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It seems like this forum has exploded with Marlin threads since the news broke, so I will add to the feeding frenzy.

The Marlin Model 60 comes in various configurations and has been in constant production roughly 4 years longer than the Ruger 10/22.

The question is this, of the Marlin Model 60's out there what one has the biggest following.

I myself have a Glenfield Marlin Model 60, do people look down on the Glenfield version, I certainly do not.

Thoughts?
 

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Relevant improvements to newly built Marlin semi-auto rimfire models would be nice. Not radical changes of breaking what doesn't already work just fine, but for the Model 60, Papoose, 795,7000 it would be nice if they finally got around to releasing a model that made room on the top for a scope base instead of that annoying dovetail.

That's one thing I really do not like about the Marlin rimfire rifles is that annoying dovetail when a scope base would be best.

Maybe get a few distributor exclusives of updated polymer stocks by Magpul/ProMag, etc. that give better options regarding length of pull and comb height.
 

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The Marlin 60 And Ruger 10/22 are totally different. They shoot .22lr and that is about all they have in common. The Marlin is a pita to break down, always has been. However, if you like tube feed, and many people do, including myself, then it is a good choice. If you like a magazine fed rifle then the 10/22 is the way to go. As far as which is better or more accurate...you might as well argue about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin!!
 

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Relevant improvements to newly built Marlin semi-auto rimfire models would be nice. Not radical changes of breaking what doesn't already work just fine, but for the Model 60, Papoose, 795,7000 it would be nice if they finally got around to releasing a model that made room on the top for a scope base instead of that annoying dovetail.

That's one thing I really do not like about the Marlin rimfire rifles is that annoying dovetail when a scope base would be best.

Maybe get a few distributor exclusives of updated polymer stocks by Magpul/ProMag, etc. that give better options regarding length of pull and comb height.
have it drilled and tapped for bases..problem solved.
 

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I already have a Model 60 and a 10-22. To heck with all of this talk about Marlin semi-auto 22 rifles. I want to place my order today for a Ruger-Marlin (Rugerlin) Model 39A with a nice stock and an 18" barrel. Would be much handier than that long 24" thing Marlin has been putting on there.
 

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SO, IF AND WHEN RUGER DOES RE CREATE THE 39A...THEY MAY USE INVESTMENT CAST RECEIVERS LIKE THEY DO WITH MANY OF THIER FIREARMS....ARE YOU OK WITH THAT...I AM.
 

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Did Ruger only buy the name, or did they also buy the production facility?
If so, they can retain the forged receivers, etc.
I do hope Ruger will rectify the soft steel carrier problem that has plagued Marlins for decades, and causes the Marlin Jam.
Cowboy gunsmiths have been fitting a flat of tool steel at the wear point and correcting the installed height to cure the worn carrier problem.
 

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My understanding is that RUger bought all of the Marlin assets. In the articles i read it says Ruger will not be keeping the current Marlin/Rem production facilities but will be moving Marlin porduction into their current production sites. That would seem to me to be a perfect opportunity for ruger to re engineer the 39a with an Investment cast reiver.
 

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Did Ruger only buy the name, or did they also buy the production facility?
If so, they can retain the forged receivers, etc.
I do hope Ruger will rectify the soft steel carrier problem that has plagued Marlins for decades, and causes the Marlin Jam.
Cowboy gunsmiths have been fitting a flat of tool steel at the wear point and correcting the installed height to cure the worn carrier problem.
Ruger didn't get any real estate. They did get some machinery.


So who bought Remington guns? I have not been able to find any info.

Ya must not have looked very hard.
 

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Remington liquidated, Ruger bought Marlin. FTC has to approve. Sig bought the ammo assets.
Nyet! Try again!

It appears that Vista Outdoors will get the ammunition business, which will put it with Speer, CCI, Blazer, and American Eagle ammunition. Right now, ammo appears to be a very lucrative business, to say the least.
Meanwhile the firearm manufacturing was apparently purchased in part by Sturm Ruger & Co. The rest of the manufacturing was purchase by Round Hill Group LLC, who doesn’t seem to have any previous presence in the firearm industry. So, what does this all mean for gun buyers?
Honestly, it probably doesn’t mean all that much. For now, guns will still be made and sold just like they have been. Fewer individual companies is problematic since it ultimately reduces competition which can ultimately lead to higher prices, but that’s not likely to be a factor for some time. This was copied from Bearing arms news ..
You forgot Federal. Also recheck your info on the Roundhill Group. Roundhill Group LLC Purchases Remington Firearms Plenty of firearms experience there.

PSA lost out in the Bid for the Remington Ammo Division. But with Vista outdoors now pretty much owning all Ammo brands Except for Olin/Winchester and Hornady. I hope they don't decide to Switch to the Non-civilian Market. That will not be good at all..
I'm with ya on that. I'm not comfortable with one company owning three of the four major ammo makers in the US.
 

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Now, we all know that Ruger will take over the Marlin company, which is a good thing. For those who are interested here is the copy of an article that explains what will happen the Remington brand. It will continue (since 1816).

Under New Management: Remington Rebooted?


With the smoke clearing from Remington's Chapter 11 bankruptcy sale this week, signs point to a reorganization of "Big Green" to a leaner company, focused on its roots.
With a history that goes back to 1816, Remington is regarded as the oldest remaining firearms company in the U.S., formed at a time when the young country held just 18 states. Over the past two decades, under a family of brands gathered at the time under the Freedom Group, Remington was the flagship of with a growing flotilla of gun and firearm accessory companies including Barnes Bullets, Bushmaster, Dakota Arms, DPMS, Marlin, Panther Arms, Para-Ordnance, TAPCO, AAC Suppressors, Stormlake Barrels and others.
Now, with its ammunition businesses going to Vista-- who owns CCI and Federal-- and Sierra, Marlin going to Ruger, and just about everything else bought by Franklin Armory, Sportsman's Warehouse, and the holding company that owns Palmetto State Armory, only a diminished core of the pre-2006 Remington endures under the smaller green banner.
That core, to include traditional Remington-branded long guns, shotguns, pistols, as well as the firearms manufacturing facilities in Ilion, New York, and Lenoir, Tennessee, along with the company's museum, and gift shop, went to Roundhill Group LLC, the high bidder at $13 million.
"Our intent with this acquisition is to return the company to its traditional place as an iconic American hunting brand" -- Jeff Edwards, Roundhill Group.

Roundhill, an investment company with headquarters in Pennsylvania and Florida, formed from a "group of experienced firearms manufacturing and hunting industry professionals" released a statement Wednesday announcing they wanted to make Remington, long-suffering from declining sales and somewhat hit-and-miss PR in the gun community, into something to be proud of once again.
"Our intent with this acquisition is to return the company to its traditional place as an iconic American hunting brand," said Edwards. "We intend to maintain, care for, and nurture the brand and all of the dedicated employees who have crafted these products over the years for outdoorsmen and women both here in the USA and abroad. More than anything, we want to make Remington a household name that is spoken with pride."
With Roundhill reportedly having no other real estate holdings, and custody of Remington's huge Huntsville, Alabama plant reverting to the city which holds a $12.5 million mortgage on it, the company is looking to keep making guns at the historic plant in upper New York's Mohawk Valley. There, according to local reports, some 700 workers were furloughed last week until further notice, pending the outcome of the sale.
New York State Senator James L. Seward (R/C/I – Oneonta), said he spoke with Roundhill and found the gun maker's new owners, "committed to restoring the Remington name and continuing the firearm manufacturer’s longstanding tradition of quality craftsmanship."
Seward said the plant could soon be humming again, possibly before Christmas. "Within 30 to 60 days an initial recall of 200 workers is expected, and I would anticipate additional growth shortly thereafter," he said.
As for now, Billy Hogue, Remington’s vice president of operations, told the (Utica) Times Telegram on Thursday morning that, “There are things to still get sorted out,” and that “It’s going to take some time.”

Reference:

Guns.com
 
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