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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1996 - 1999

For more serial number specific dating, check the link below.

Thank you, I went to the Ruger site twice and found different lists both times, and now this is the third. It was a little confusing. Do you know if there is a book that shows the difference, or development for each new series?
 

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Thank you, I went to the Ruger site twice and found different lists both times, and now this is the third. It was a little confusing. Do you know if there is a book that shows the difference, or development for each new series?
 

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The Sunflower link is very useful, but like the Ruger site, there is something to be aware of:

Understand the date-range "S/N beginning with". If your S/N is earlier than the "beginning" date, it was made the year before. That was the case for my 181-series Mini. A "new series" doesn't necessarily indicate a new design, just that they ran out of numbers.

If you're really interested, your can call Ruger C/S and they can tell you when it was manufactured. If you want the equivalent of a birth certificate for it, it will cost you about $10. I did that for my 181.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a SS Ranch 195 series, looks like it was made in 1997. I've had a couple of minor issues with the series, like I bought a tactical stock for it, but didn't fit it, and I have never modified the stock to make it work. Ended up putting it in a Butler Creek folder.

I would be interested in knowing what the barrel twist is. But you know, I've only owned it since 1997, so I don't want to rush in on it...lol

Thanks for the info.
 

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"Sunflower" barrel twist rate link in post above, but will repeat it here: Sunflower Ammo.com: Ruger Mini-14/30 Barrel Twist Rates

Suggest using the "optimal" bullet for your barrel's Rate-of-Twist is a useful place to start, but since every rifle is unique, it would not be surprising to find that your particular rifle "liked" some "non-optimal" ammo.

Suggest experimenting with a wide variety of ammo and taking detailed notes. Stock-up on the ammo that seems to do well for your rifle.

As always, any modifications done to your Mini can change things, some more than others. You may have to do some-re-testing after some modifications.
 

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Exalted One
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I have a SS Ranch 195 series, looks like it was made in 1997. I've had a couple of minor issues with the series, like I bought a tactical stock for it, but didn't fit it, and I have never modified the stock to make it work. Ended up putting it in a Butler Creek folder.

I would be interested in knowing what the barrel twist is. But you know, I've only owned it since 1997, so I don't want to rush in on it...lol

Thanks for the info.
Okay, the 195 S/N batch was an interesting mix of a 1:7 and a 1:9 twist rate:
If your S/N is less than 195-27761, it is 1:7.
If your S/N is greater than 195-44221, it is 1:9
For S/Ns in between, you will need to call Ruger C/S to determine, and they will be happy to provide that info over the phone for free.

There are techniques using cleaning rods to determine, also - just check the threads here.

Twist rate can be important in determining the best bullet weight to use, but 62gr seems to work well in both.

Hope this helps!
 

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Agree with highly useful and well-informed comments by RJF. In addition, suggest that since every Mini is a unique item, perhaps trying a wide variety of ammo and taking careful notes.

Beginning near the "optimal" bullet weight is a good point to start, but suggest you consider some reasonable "branching-out" from that "optimal" beginning point.

For example, I have a 186 series "Pencil-barrel" Mini, which happens to have a 1-7" Rate of Twist barrel, in good condition, and much-modified. I can see the difference in group size, and even Point-of-Aim, between different types of ammo, bullet weight being but one of the variables.

I've seen some 55 gn bullets shoot better than the "optimal" 62 gn ammo out of my 1-7" ROT ARs and my Mini, and I ascribe that to better ammo quality. My carefully made Milsurp equivalents of both M-193 and M-855 ammo seem to show the 1-7" barrel slightly favoring the M-855 (62-gn) bullets, but the differences are slight.

Keep in mind that most mods to the rifle may affect its' accuracy, so be prepared to re-visit your ammo accuracy tests after making mods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Okay, the 195 S/N batch was an interesting mix of a 1:7 and a 1:9 twist rate:
If your S/N is less than 195-27761, it is 1:7.
If your S/N is greater than 195-44221, it is 1:9
For S/Ns in between, you will need to call Ruger C/S to determine, and they will be happy to provide that info over the phone for free.

There are techniques using cleaning rods to determine, also - just check the threads here.

Twist rate can be important in determining the best bullet weight to use, but 62gr seems to work well in both.

Hope this helps!
Of course, I own one that is in the middle. I'll call RUGER, thanks.
 

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Of course, I own one that is in the middle. I'll call RUGER, thanks.
Ruger Customer Service is second to none. Based on your full serial number they can tell you in great detail everything about your particular Mini, including twist rate. Once you have that info it will help you with ammo selection.

Hopefully we'll hear from forum member Imarangemaster, who has significant experiential knowledge of 1:7 and 1:9 twist rate concerning optimal bullet weights for each. I know Mini-14s with 1:7 twist rate are much better at stabilizing heaver projectiles, such as 77 Grain.
 
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