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Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up my mini from the gunsmith,I had a bull pup conversion on it and wanted it back to normal can it be dated using the ser.no. And is there a particular sling from vickers that is best.Other then that I wouldn’t mind a recommendation on a small laser scope Thanks I own a security.redhawk and superredhawk,just have to reacquaint myself with the ranch rifle
 

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"The Real Deal"
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i would say that a gg&g short rail on the receiver or the amega or ultimak rail on the forearm are good choices and allow endless optics options. The vortex strikefire. trijicon rmr, burris fast fire II are great optics. even the primary arms microdot which uses the same mount as the aimpoint T-1 are great sights. The trijicon rmo is another good one. For magnified optics i would say vortex crossfire 1-4×24 with 30mm rings is great. just a few suggestions. I run a simple us sling in OD green on mine, 2 point.
 
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i would say that a gg&g short rail on the receiver or the amega or ultimak rail on the forearm are good choices and allow endless optics options. The vortex strikefire. trijicon rmr, burris fast fire II are great optics. even the primary arms microdot which uses the same mount as the aimpoint T-1 are great sights. The trijicon rmo is another good one. For magnified optics i would say vortex crossfire 1-4×24 with 30mm rings is great. just a few suggestions. I run a simple us sling in OD green on mine, 2 point.
Thank you I will look at them all,want it to look good in case of a stand your ground pic. Kidding I’m stocked up on pepper spray
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I have a lot of scoped rifles, but my mini-14s (older S/S folder & newer 500 series) do NOT get scoped.
For me, they are a light carbine that can get banged around & still run. The irons on mine are good for 2-3" at 100Y, we are not talking about a "Bench Gun" with these rifles.
But, YOUR rifle & whatever makes you happy with it! Light enough that a plain old nylon sling works for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a lot of scoped rifles, but my mini-14s (older S/S folder & newer 500 series) do NOT get scoped.
For me, they are a light carbine that can get banged around & still run. The irons on mine are good for 2-3" at 100Y, we are not talking about a "Bench Gun" with these rifles.
But, YOUR rifle & whatever makes you happy with it! Light enough that a plain old nylon sling works for me.
You’re right,and I’m not looking for a traditional scoped setup,just a red or green laser setup that I’ve grown fond of on a couple of carry guns.I haven’t looked around yet but wondered if a small setup was possible for lowlight conditions and diminishing eyesight.If not I still consider it a great dependable little rifle that’s been easy to reload for.
 

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I use FastFire dots mounted on the Ultimak handguard. You could put a laser on a rail mounted on the sides of the stock or on the bottom.
All the Vickers slings are good, I use the basic one that starts at $45. Quick adjustability with the pull tab.
My slings are on the right side as I'm left handed.


 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info.The rifles look great,I wish mine had the heavier barrel,the gunsmith explained the big difference that makes for accuracy.
 

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Exalted One
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PGM, a few things to get you in focus.
This site will help you in determining your year of manufacture, and also the barrel twist rate. The barrel twist rate will/should affect your choice of ammo (either .223 REM or 5.56 NATO). Note the beginning S/N for year of manufacture. If yours is lower, then it was made the previous year.

"Skinny Minis" have a bad rep for accuracy; some valid, some not. Minis are, after all, are a carbine, not a sniper rifle. A 3-4" COM at 100 yards is sufficient for two-legged predators, and depending on your views, acceptable for four-legged predators. I personally want something a bit more precise/humane for the rare rabid four-legged critter ('yote or 'coon) as I generally love animals of most stripe as long as they leave our barn cats, horses, and us alone, and prefer that distance being around 50-100 yards. I bought a bolt gun for that if I have the opportunity, otherwise, the Mini-14 will do the job, perhaps not as cleanly as I'd prefer.

The occasional timed shooting should not cause much barrel whip; it is when it gets heated up when accuracy declines.

Shoot your mini first and see how things go. If they go badly in terms of accuracy, consider an AccuStrut. I toyed with one for a bit for my 181GB Mini and decided it was fine for my desired/intended purpose without one. But it was nice mental masturbation while toying with it. I violated the most basic scientific directives: the "before" part. In the end, I preferred keeping my 181GB original (my first firearm) and still capable of mounting a bayonet in the event of the ultimate zombie attack or need for a bayonet charge (it is 2020, after all). It suits my original (1980) and current needs/desires. In the 40 years I've owned it, it has never failed and is pretty consistent in taking down half-silhouette pop-up targets at an Army range at 300 meters (with iron sights and decent eyes). Good enough for me. An Army saying (which I hated at first) is "perfect is the enemy of good enough"...

If you intend to frequently do mag-dumps, then you probably need an Accustrut. Otherwise, you may be good as-is. There is also the option of shortening the barrel to 16.5" (versus the 18" standard barrel) and re-crown. That should do wonders without adding the weight of an Accustrut.

Lastly, it appears yours (from your photo) is a non-ranch model (no provision for a scope and the internals in terms of cycling differ). Swapping out gas bushings will not likely reduce any ejection distance since the ejection process is from a spring in the bolt rather than the cycling action. My 181GB non-ranch ejects about four feet. If it gets to be a problem, I will replace the spring in the bolt (if cleaning doesn't do the trick). For non-ranch models, a front (and rear) buffer work well, change the entire nature of the felt cycling, and the front buffers survive for thousands of rounds. I make my own from vinyl baseboard, but commercial 1911 buffers work fine. The problem ensues with the Ranch models where a "lip" is introduced on the op-rod, which chews up any buffer sacrificed to the Mini God.

Factory mags are preferred, mostly the 20-round variety if allowed in your state. I have a few 5 and 10 rounders that I have never experimented with (yet) but got them to see. Also two factory 30-rounders for the same reason. But the 20-rounders seem to be the best fit.

S/N knowledge will also let you know the most appropriate measure should the eject range disturb you. Non-ranch models won't likely benefit from a gas bushing reduction as the ejection force is dependent on a spring in the bolt rather than the cycling force.

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It did what I found out is it’s a 1980 1 in 10 which I guess means it’s .223 only.i looked at the accu strut LT but didn’t pull the trigger till I have a range session.What is the threaded insert on the side of the receiver for? And the barrel is 18”. Thanks again.
 

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It did what I found out is it’s a 1980 1 in 10 which I guess means it’s .223 only.i looked at the accu strut LT but didn’t pull the trigger till I have a range session.What is the threaded insert on the side of the receiver for? And the barrel is 18”. Thanks again.
It's not 223 only. Ruger listed that for a time for export reasons as some countries specifically banned 556 rifles. All Mini 14's except some later target models can run either 556 or 223 with no issues.
 

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It's not 223 only. Ruger listed that for a time for export reasons as some countries specifically banned 556 rifles. All Mini 14's except some later target models can run either 556 or 223 with no issues.
Thanks I wasn’t sure if it was the other way around.The 500 brass I bought from midway years ago say 223
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Exalted One
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PGM, the threaded hole on the left side is not standard or even an option. Probably a (very bad) Bubba-fix to maybe mount a scope. There are kits to allow mounting a scope (B-Square and UTG). I have one of each and they offer mixed results without a generous application of Blue Loctite. Pic below.

Can confirm Sarkus' comment: very specific and correct. I've been shooting M193 NATO almost constantly out of my 1977-vintage 181-series since 1980 (before I even knew there was a difference). PMC Bronze .223 works just fine for me.
Here's a link to the owner's manual:

I've been shooting PMC Bronze .223 for a few years with zero problems. I was happy with the results and the price was better. To my interests and the ranges I'm interested in and the accuracy I'm interested in, there is little difference between .223 REM 55gr ball (e.g. PMC Bronze) and M193 NATO (also 55gr ball). At 50-150 yards range, the difference is IMHO negligible if you're shooting at a silhouette (or two-legged monster). I have little personal need for ranges beyond that, and for that, I have a bolt gun (.223 only).

Here's a pic of a side-mounted scope rail if you're interested. Copious application of blue loctite is a must.
left-side close-up.JPG

This is a sub-optimal solution, but all that was available when I got it. The early non-ranch models ejected brass more vertically than horizonatly and would often hit anything over the receiver. I get some hits on the rail, but not often. The plus is you can shift from irons to a scope or red-dot by simple shifting from cheek- to chin-weld. Hard to find these days...
 
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