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Discussion Starter #1
Might have made a mistake in buying the 3 inch sp101.
Wife really didn’t like the feel and thought it was too heavy. She didn’t shoot it yet. Has a friend who has a LCR and likes the feel of it but hasn’t shot it either. She has very little experience in shooting a handgun. Thought about just going to a 2 inch sp101, and gun store said that would cost me $100 to trade out. New LCR is $450.
I can live with either a 2 or 3, but if she won’t shoot the 2 inch, I’m out $100 bucks for nothing.
Sorry. Just venting.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
She needs to actually shoot the guns. The LCR is lightweight and carries easily. It also has recoil with standard loads many ladies find objectionable. The SP101 is a steel gun and weighs more. It is also more comfortable to shoot and will be more fun to practice with.
I myself have never shot a 2 inch. At the range what distances do you start with?
She thinks the longer barrel makes it drop in front when she is just handling the gun, not shooting it.
A 2 inch and $100 out the window might be the answer.
 

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Thomas D, what you are experiencing is not an uncommon problem. I have 3 pistols that I got for my wife thinking that she would take to them. She did not. On the bright side, I have 3 more pistols in my collection!

I encourage you to ask your wife to accompany you to a LGS with a range and a rental counter. There, she can try out several handguns in different calibers to see what she is comfortable shooting and carrying. Is she recoil shy?

There is nothing wrong with a smaller caliber; starting her off with 22lr. You might also see if you can get your hands on some 38sp wadcutters for the SP101. They are very light in the recoil department and will feel quite easy-shooting from the SP101.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thomas D, what you are experiencing is not an uncommon problem. I have 3 pistols that I got for my wife thinking that she would take to them. She did not. On the bright side, I have 3 more pistols in my collection!

I encourage you to ask your wife to accompany you to a LGS with a range and a rental counter. There, she can try out several handguns in different calibers to see what she is comfortable shooting and carrying. Is she recoil shy?

There is nothing wrong with a smaller caliber; starting her off with 22lr. You might also see if you can get your hands on some 38sp wadcutters for the SP101. They are very light in the recoil department and will feel quite easy-shooting from the SP101.
Thanks hlg.
Wad cutters seem to be very hard to find around my neck of the woods.
Yes she is recoil/noise shy. Bad combo for shooting.
I’ll have to go to a larger city to get a rental firearm at a range.
I’ll try to work it out, just frustrating.
 

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Thanks hlg.
Wad cutters seem to be very hard to find around my neck of the woods.
Yes she is recoil/noise shy. Bad combo for shooting.
I’ll have to go to a larger city to get a rental firearm at a range.
I’ll try to work it out, just frustrating.
My wife had initially said she was interested in shooting, but she isn't. She does have a 22 mag revolver in the nightstand for "just in case" situations and she is a good shot, but she's just not into it like I am. After 27 years of marriage, I learned that it's not worth me trying to "encourage" her to do something if she's not fully on board.

She's been to the range with me a handful of times and she absolutely hates the noise. Maybe too, the fact that the ear muffs mess up her hair! She's a self-proclaimed girly-girl.

Honestly, my best advice would be to let your wife try out a 22lr (if she wants to do so) and leave it at that. She might just enjoy the 22 enough to try out some 38's out of that SP101. Worst case scenario, she doesn't take to shooting...and you get a nice little 22 to add to your collection.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My wife had initially said she was interested in shooting, but she isn't. She does have a 22 mag revolver in the nightstand for "just in case" situations and she is a good shot, but she's just not into it like I am. After 27 years of marriage, I learned that it's not worth me trying to "encourage" her to do something if she's not fully on board.

She's been to the range with me a handful of times and she absolutely hates the noise. Maybe too, the fact that the ear muffs mess up her hair! She's a self-proclaimed girly-girl.

Honestly, my best advice would be to let your wife try out a 22lr (if she wants to do so) and leave it at that. She might just enjoy the 22 enough to try out some 38's out of that SP101. Worst case scenario, she doesn't take to shooting...and you get a nice little 22 to add to your collection.
Good idea.
 

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Advice from Granny: Never buy your wife a purse or a gun! -- That is, not unless she has specifically told you and/or written down exactly what she knows she wants.

If it is impossible for you to get to a range that rents guns, the one exception to my statement above is as follows: I highly recommend a S&W M&P .22lr COMPACT. The grip fits at least 98% of hand sizes, there is almost no recoil and the noise is as low as it gets when you are actually shooting. It is as non ammo picky as any gun I've ever owned, and unless you only hold it with two fingers it is not sensitive to limp wristing. DO NOT have her try a .22WMR in any make or model. Bad recoil and huge noise factor!

I do not recommend a revolver because the grips are smaller and the trigger pulls are in every case harder and almost always longer than a good beginner model .22 semi auto.

In any case, do not waste your time and money buying any other guns until you actually know if your wife WILL shoot what "you buy for her!" I know that .22lr is not considered a self defense round by hardly anyone - but if it is the only gun she will use, it is also true that no one really wants to get shot with any caliber at all!

When I was younger, pre-arthritis, I was not noise or recoil sensitive. I have known both men and women who are, though, and I think the worst thing you can do is try to get that person to shoot something that will turn them off to shooting anything at all.

I shoot regularly with a woman who very wisely took herself to a shop/range and tried a bunch of different guns, mostly semi auto but one snubbie revolver that she hated. At age 68 she felt she would do best starting with a .22 and she chose the M&P .22 compact. I've had one for a few years and it truly is a joy to shoot! This woman has been shooting for well over a year now and is ready to move up to a 9mm. She has shot my .380's and knows that a 9mm has more recoil than .380, but she is making this decision from knowledge and experience.
 

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I agree with Shooting Grandma 100%. When I have bought my wife guns, I buy her gift certificates. I know there is a 99.9% chance that she will go the direction I “suggest” but being the one that drives the decision and feeling included (at least for my wife) helps. Take her to the gun shop and let her handle what is in stock. She will know what feels right.

For what it’s worth, my wife carries an LCR in .357 with .38 special critical defense.

She also did her CPL class with my 617 with a 6” barrel and complained that it was too heavy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If she isnt interested then you cant force her. But the idea of a 22 mag revolver is a good choice. Make sure it's in a barrel length that makes good use of the 22mag velocity.

I think 3 inch is the best for realizing the potential of the 38 plus or 357 mag.

There are a bunch of articles demonstrating that out of a 2 inch 9mm actually shines. There is alot of velocity loss for the 38 and 357.

Of course you could look at rugers 57.
 

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My wife learned on a 22lr SR22 and LCR. She decided that she preferred the revolver. Liked the simplicity of the revolver and did not want to rack a slide. Then tried a 22 magnum LCR. She did not like the louder bang or flash (note Granny's comment on this) Wife is very happy with her LCR. She also has the 3 inch LCRX. Very pleased that she has a gun she likes and shoots well.
 

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I totally agree with hlg! I've done the same thing...bought a firearm for the wife because "I" thought it would be the ideal one for her. It wasn't. The good part is now I have a nice LCR22WMR in my collection...plus...she went out on her own and selected a .380 Kimber Micro that's mine to shoot whenever I want. It's a win/win for me no matter how you look at it.
 

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A few years back my wife bought an LCR in 38 spc mainly because that is was her LEO father shot. Well after a few rounds at the local indoor range she decided it was way too much recoil for her. So she now has an LCR in .22. In both cases they are “Feel good” In that it makes her feel good with a gun in the car. I’ve tried getting her to a pistol but she doesn’t have any real hand strength so racking the slide is an issue.

The net of all this, is the DW really needs to be there, test fire and gun you may want to buy for her. And if she doesn’t really want a new gun or any gun, you can’t make her like it.
 

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I myself have never shot a 2 inch. At the range what distances do you start with?
She thinks the longer barrel makes it drop in front when she is just handling the gun, not shooting it.
A 2 inch and $100 out the window might be the answer.
First, someone with smaller hands or weaker arms may have a legitimate gripe about the weight of the gun. I know people who prefer Commanders over full size 1911's for that reason. My wife likes my SR1911 full size, but the gun begins to droop for her after about 20-25 shots. Her "full size" is a Range Officer Compact. Recoil is significantly more, but she handles that fine. Her favorite gun is a Sig P938. She is more accurate with that than the Springfield despite the shorter barrel and sight radius.

As far as the range you begin with? As close as you are allowed. The ranges I shoot at don't allow anything closer than 7 yards, which is a good place to begin. It is very important to get the new shooter some early success.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My wife had initially said she was interested in shooting, but she isn't. She does have a 22 mag revolver in the nightstand for "just in case" situations and she is a good shot, but she's just not into it like I am. After 27 years of marriage, I learned that it's not worth me trying to "encourage" her to do something if she's not fully on board.

She's been to the range with me a handful of times and she absolutely hates the noise. Maybe too, the fact that the ear muffs mess up her hair! She's a self-proclaimed girly-girl.

Honestly, my best advice would be to let your wife try out a 22lr (if she wants to do so) and leave it at that. She might just enjoy the 22 enough to try out some 38's out of that SP101. Worst case scenario, she doesn't take to shooting...and you get a nice little 22 to add to your collection.
Hey hlg
I’m trying to find a reply you sent but can’t find it. Something in it about why I bought the gun etc. nothing offended me in the least. Just wanted to explain privately.
 

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The first gun my wife had when we got married was a steel frame snubby revolver. She shot it fine, but never carried it, because she said it was too heavy in her purse. At the time I owned an old air weight she picked up and said "this is it, I want it", then she shot it. Ouch!

I traded her steel frame gun and now we both have airweight S&W .38s now. Both are like the LCR, light and nasty to shoot. So, she had a weight AND recoil problem to overcome.

At first, we would practice with my GP100 and 38 shells, which worked fine for me, but my 6 inch gun is too heavy for her. So, I went on the search for a J frame size .22 revolver. Found a nice one made by Taurus and we bought it. Now we practice with .22 as much as she wants and save 5 or 10 shots of .38 for her to shoot at the end of the session.

Not the cheapest solution, but now she carries her 38 daily. Practicing with the .22 has improved her .38 shooting a lot, but still after 5 rounds or so she wants the .22 back.
 

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My wife took the women's intro class at Sig Academy and then promptly bought a P250 C in 9 MM with the 20% discount coupon they gave her. She has a carry license but does not carry. The P250 is more for home and range use.
 

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Might have made a mistake in buying the 3 inch sp101.
Wife really didn’t like the feel and thought it was too heavy. She didn’t shoot it yet. Has a friend who has a LCR and likes the feel of it but hasn’t shot it either. She has very little experience in shooting a handgun. Thought about just going to a 2 inch sp101, and gun store said that would cost me $100 to trade out. New LCR is $450.
I can live with either a 2 or 3, but if she won’t shoot the 2 inch, I’m out $100 bucks for nothing.
Sorry. Just venting.
Hi- I an NRA-certified pistol instructor and a woman. I teach shooting to women. Your "starter" revolver is too big of a caliber for her, especially if she is inexperienced. She will probably be upset after shooting a .357 Mag for the first time. Women have smaller hands and that 3" barrel will have a heckuva recoil for an inexperienced hand. I have had women freak out after shooting snub-nosed revolvers due to the recoil. I would suggest, first of all, to let HER choose her own revolver/semi-auto pistol and if possible to shoot it to try it out prior to purchase. A .22lr or .380 or 9mm would be more preferable to the big bang effect of a .357 Mag. Too many women get turned off to shooting because they get pushed to start right off by shooting a large caliber firearm. We teach women to shoot using Mark IV .22lr pistols, they're low recoil and less intimidating. And when she finally does get the pistol of her choosing, have her take a course to learn how to shoot properly to gain confidence in herself and her firearm. It may sound weird, but women learn to shoot differently from men.
 
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