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Discussion Starter #1
Ever hear of a Mk III barrel threaded to the receiver too far or not far enough so the barrel is "tilted" to one side ?
 

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I'm not sure what youre talking about with threaded, but I do know that you have to line the barrel up when putting it back on. With mine, I can hold to one side and be straight on but if I rotate it slightly the other way, it can go past the point of being centered
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not sure what youre talking about with threaded, but I do know that you have to line the barrel up when putting it back on. With mine, I can hold to one side and be straight on but if I rotate it slightly the other way, it can go past the point of being centered
A shooting buddy of mine said he bought a new MK III SS BB, and the sites were tilted to one side, so he returned it for a Buckmark. I've owned no less than a dozen MKs over the years and currently enjoy three, and have never seen that prblem with a new gun.
 

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:D
I'm not sure what youre talking about with threaded, but I do know that you have to line the barrel up when putting it back on. With mine, I can hold to one side and be straight on but if I rotate it slightly the other way, it can go past the point of being centered
From you're response, I've learned something I wasn't aware of. The barrel and receiver on a Mark .22 are machined as one piece. I've always assumed the barrel was threaded to the reciever, but not so. So I'm guessing his problem was as you stated. Thanks for the info.
 

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:D

The barrel and receiver on a Mark .22 are machined as one piece.
Nope, they are separate pieces, "crush threaded" together. Near impossible to get them apart without severe damage to at least one of the two parts. I have heard of one or two that got assembled out of line.
 

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Agree!

The receiver and barrel are two seperate pieces...

I've seen Mark pistols that were nearly impossible so separate the barrel/receiver assembly from the frame, and ones that were loose enough that the barrel/receiver could be shifted in the frame.

I've never seen one with a barrel misaligned in the receiver...It is within the realm of possibilities though...

If that is in fact the case then it's one Ruger would probably like to have back, so they could make it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
:D
Agree!

The receiver and barrel are two seperate pieces...

I've seen Mark pistols that were nearly impossible so separate the barrel/receiver assembly from the frame, and ones that were loose enough that the barrel/receiver could be shifted in the frame.

I've never seen one with a barrel misaligned in the receiver...It is within the realm of possibilities though...

If that is in fact the case then it's one Ruger would probably like to have back, so they could make it right.
Thanks all. Shot these great guns for years and didn't know that. Interesting !
 

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The finished Ruger .22 Auto barrels are fully inserted and torqued into raw 1" tubing at the factory. Then the front sight hole (or slot in a Standard model) is used to index all the other receiver cuts. The ejection port, the underside, the front and rear lugs, LCI slot, sight dovetail, and the bolt stop pin holes are all cut into the receiver tubes after the barrels are installed. This allows the factory to use automated manufacturing procedures to make all the receivers to very tight tolerances. As long as the sight holes are properly indexed, the machinery is properly calibrated, everything else is cut to fit. Even the final length of the bullet's feed ramp depends on the underside mill cut of the receiver.

R,
Bullseye
 

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Discussion Starter #9
:)
The finished Ruger .22 Auto barrels are fully inserted and torqued into raw 1" tubing at the factory. Then the front sight hole (or slot in a Standard model) is used to index all the other receiver cuts. The ejection port, the underside, the front and rear lugs, LCI slot, sight dovetail, and the bolt stop pin holes are all cut into the receiver tubes after the barrels are installed. This allows the factory to use automated manufacturing procedures to make all the receivers to very tight tolerances. As long as the sight holes are properly indexed, the machinery is properly calibrated, everything else is cut to fit. Even the final length of the bullet's feed ramp depends on the underside mill cut of the receiver.

R,
Bullseye
Great educational info for Ruger Mark fans. Hopefully many forum members will read and learn from this discussion.
 
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